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Full text of "Panama Canal record"

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II 



CANAL RECORD 



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VOLUME 2 



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UNIVERSITY 
OF FLORIDA 
LIBRARIES 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2009 with funding from 

University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/panamacanalrecor02isth 



CANAL 




RECORD 



PUBLISHED WEEKLY UNDER THE 
AUTHORITY AND SUPERVISION OF 
THE ISTHMIAN CANAL COMMISSION 



SEPTEIMBER 2, 1908, TO AUGUST 25, 1909 



VOLUME II. 



WITH INDEX 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE 

ISTHMIAN CANAL COMMISSION 

1909. 



MOUNT HOPB, CANAI, ZONE 

ISTHJIIAN CANAI, COMMISSION PRINTING OFFICE; 

1909. 



INDEX. 



Accidents— 

Culebra Cut. Cucaracha, 2R2. 
Drowning". 74. 411. 
Dynamite. St'c Explosions. 

Gorgona foundry, 58. 
Railroad wrecks. See Wrecks. 
Accounts — 

Examination of. 39. [367. 372-5. 

Manufacturing and classified expenditures, 360. 

Surcharges, percentages. 304. 375. 

Third Division. Chief Engineer's office. 191. 
Accountable officers, 13S, 240. 
Addresses, officials', while in States. 43. 
Administration of estates, 90, 387. 

See also Legal Notices. 
Age limit, maximum for reappointment. 272. 
Agricultural experts" visit. 401. 
Air. See Compressed air. 
Aliens going to States, rules for entry, 388. 
Allotments, transfer. 50. 
A neon — 

Church dedication, 140. 

Corral. 194. 

Dairy operations, 334. 

Fire protection, 118. 

Hospital, visiting hours, 250. 

Insane Asylum. 3S9. 

I^a Boca (Balboa) road closed. 1S6. 

laundry, 394. 

I^odgehall, 371. 

Meteorological observatory. 42. 

Quarry. 169. 297. 353. 3S5. 

Quartermaster's office moved. 378. 

Reservoir, building of. 33. 65. 297. 

Water system. 322, 377. 
Anglican Church on the Isthmus. 78. 
Appeal, criminal cases. 98. 101. 
Appropriation, Sundry Civil. 346. 

Deficiency. 1909. 346. 

Urgent Deficiency. 393. 
Army officers, pay. 21. 
Atlantic Division — 

Cost, comparative estimates. 214. 

Dam. See Dam. 

Division engineer, acting. 27. 

Dredging. See Dredging. 

Excavation. See Excavation. 

I^bor train between Gatun and Culebra. 410. 

I^imits of. 133. 

IvOcks. See I^ocks. • [349. 

Sand ser\'ice at Nombre de Dies. 65. 161. 241. 253. 

Steam shovel records. See Steam shovels. 

Storehouses, 6. 43. 105. 

Tug and steamer equipment. 35. [reports. 

See a/so Chairman and Chief Engineer, monthly 



Bachelor l.\bor. cost. 130. 

Baggage, allowance and checking. 1S3. 322. 408. 

Bakery — 

Bread, cake and pastry, amount consumed. 415. 

Improvements. 193, 266, 393. 
Balboa — 

Aucon road, closing, 186. 

Canal, five miles opened to navig,Ttion, 193. 

Compressed air plant, 69. 

Fire protection. 118. 

French canal closed, 249. 

l,a Boca, named changed to Balboa, 2S1. 

Landing stage. 225. 

Marine shop. See Marine shops. [182. 

Port of. handling facilities and extent of trade. 

Quartermaster, District, new office, 409, 

Sand and repair wharf, 242. 338. 

Sewer, outfall, S3. 

Storehouseand office. Pacific Division. 39,241,273. 

Water system. 377. 
Balboa Hill. 38. 
Band. Isthmian Canal Commission — 

Concerts. See each issue. 

History. 22. 
Barbados — 

Immigrants. 378. 

Recruiting laborers, 361, 394. 
Baseball, scores and notices. 83, 114. 123. 174. 183. 191 
208,243.327.335. 



Bas Obispo — 

Explosions, premature. 125. 129, 137. 155. 210. 

Fire protection. 117. 

See also Culebra Cut. 
Bayano River Lumber Company — 

Lumber for Canal work. 361, 401. 

Tug overdue. 398. 
Bills and Acts of Congress. See Congress. 
Bills, rules for rendering. 287. 
Black Swamp, drainage, 26. 
Blasting supplies, 251. 

See also Dynamite. 
Boarders in married quarters, 272. 
Boiler inspection, rules amended, 251. 
Bolt extractor, manufacture. 331. 
Bonds- 
Employes'. 39. 

Issue of. for Canal construction. 393. 
Boquete. vacations in. 361. 
Brazos Brook reservoir. 121. 401. 

See a/so Filtration plants. 
Breakwater— 

Limon Bay. 46. 270. 377. 

Naos Island. 17, 241. 329, 401. 

Report of engineers to Congress. 212. 
Bridge over Culebra Cut at Empire, 209, 385. 
Building — 

Alterations, requests, 311. 

American and French, inventory, 49. 

Construction and repair. Quartermaster's Depart- 
ment. 263. 320. 355. 

Cost, construction and repair. 228. 355. 

French, value. 66. 

Inspection. 161. 

Proposals. 164, 171. 207. 240. 248. 255. 272. 279, 287. 
296. 303. 311, 320, 336. 350. 376. 391. 397. 408. 416. 
Buoys, automatic. Colon Harbor. 161. 



Cable. Submarine, across the Isthmus, 147. 
Cableways. See Locks, handling plant. 
Camp Diablo — 

Fire protection. 118. 
Quarters, family, 33. 
Camp Elliott- 
Fire protection. 117. 
Rifle range. 78. 
Cardenas Hill leveled. 137. 
Car repairs, rules. 400. 

Carriages. Commission, curtailment. 350. 376. 
Cars, Pedro Miguel handling plant. 345. 

See a/so Dump Cars. Equipment. 
Castings, shipment and rush orders. 240. 251. 
Cement — 

Contract for locks. 17. 
Purchased in 1908. 163. 
Unloader, mechanical, to be installed. 409. 
Central Division— [vision, 133. 

Chagres Division, inclusion of old. in Central Di- 
Cost, comparative estimates. 202. 
Division engineer, acting. 304. 
Dumps, capacity. 17. 253. 
Excavation. See Excavation. 
Lidgerwood unloaders. monthly records. 90. 114. 

162. 194. 226. 279. 297, 322. 361, 402. 
Liuiits, 133. 

Magazines, dynamite, 43. 
Map. topographic, 2. 
Pedro Miguel yard. 46. 
Slides, material in, 377. 

See a/so Culebra Cut. 
Steam shovel records. See Steam shovels. 
Track shifters, monthly records. 81. 113. 154, 186, 

226, 273, 297. 370. 
See a/so Culebra Cut- [reports. 

See a/ so Chairman and Chief Engineer, monthly 
Chagres Division, work in old. 43. 

See a/so Central Division. 
Chagres River — 
Freshets- 
Interfere with work, 177, 337, 345. 
Predicting, method, 37, 
Outlets in Liiuon Bay. 385. 
Stages. See each issue. 
Watershed survey, 101, 241, 305. 



Chairman and Chief Engineer- 
Acting, assignment. 27. 
Assistant. 27. 

Assistant to, assignment. 27. 

Paper read before Manufacturers' Association of 
Chicago. 243. [301.332. 380. 412. 

Reports, monthly, 28. 60, 92. 132. 172. 206. 238. 268. 
Chamber of Commerce, New York, visit of commit- 
tee, 346. 
Cham^. sand ser\'ice, 35, 41. 385. 
Charcoal, contract awarded, 34. 
Checks — 

Metal for employes. 175. 207. 
New York Sub-Treasury. 159. 
Chicago Manufacturers' Association, address. 243. 
Christmas a holiday. 133. 
Church work — 

Aucon Protestant Chapel, dedication. 140. 
Anglican Church on the Isthmus. 78. 
Bas Obispo Sunday School organized. 62. 
Chapel at Empire, dedication. 6. 
Cristobal Union Sunday School, organization, 53. 
Empire Christian League, organization, 124. 
Episcopal Mission work in Panama. 309. 
Isthmian Sunday Schools. 242. 
Notices. See each issue. 
Roman Catholic Church, Culebra. 6. 
Salvation Army, work. 358.'' 
St. Mary's Church. Empire, 22, 58, 66. 
Wesleyan Methodist Church, Panama, 235. 
Circulars, official — 

Accountable officers. 138. 240. 
Accounts — 

Examination of. instructions, 39. 
Manufacturing and classified expenditures 

360.367,372-5. 
Third Division, Chief Engineer's office. 191. 
Age limit, maximum for reappointment, 272. 
Atlantic Division — 

Division Engineer, acting. 27. 
Limits of. 133. 
Baggage allowance on transportation forms, 183. 
Balboa. La Boca changed to, 281. 
Bills, rules for rendering. 287. 
Boarders in family quarters prohibited. 272. 
Boiler inspection, rules amended. 251. 
Bonds, employes'. 39. 
Buildings. Commission — 
Alterations, requests. 311. 
Construction and repair. 263. 330. 
Business trip tickets. 111. 13S, 216, 359. 
Car repairs, rules governing. 400. 
Carriages. Commission, curtailed. 350, 376. 
Castings, shipment and rush orders, 240. 251. 
Central Division — 

Division Engineer, acting, 304. 
Limits. 133. 
Chairman and Chief Engineer, office of— 
Accounts of Third Division. 191. 
Acting Assistant Chief Engineer. 304. 
Assistant Chief Engineer, 27. 
Assi.stant to the Chief Engineer. 27. [272. 304. 
Assistant to the Chairman, assignment. 27. 
Chairman and Chief Engineer, acting, 27* 
Division of work. 27. 
Checks- 
Metal for employes and laborers, 175. 207. 
New York Sub-Treasury. 159. 
Christmas and New Year, holidays, 133. 
Civil Administration. Department of— 
Accountable officers, 240. 
Bills against. 133, 251. 
Divisions renamed, 54. 
Executive Secretary, acting, 27. 391. 
Claim ofticer — 
Acting. 27. 
Transfer of. 111. 
Coach hire, reimbursement. 367. 
Corral charges for private work. 408. 
Coupon books — 

Hotel and commissary, 119,183, 197. 298, 320. 
Decoration Day. holiday, 311. 
Depot Quartermaster, assignment. 39. 
Designing Engineers, assignment, 11. 
Disbursing office — 

Checks on New York Su!»-Treasury. 159. 
Officer, assignment, 263. 

Transfer of duties with Examiner of Ac- 
counts, 7. 



INDEX 



Circulars — 

Dogs must be muzzled ,'207. 

Klectric liglit economy, 320. 

Flmpire shops. Master Mechanic, acting. 360. 

Kngineer, traveling. 376. 400. 

Examiner of Accounts, acting, 304. 

Executive Secretary, acting. 27, 391. 

Expenditures — 

Abstractor, form revised, 359. 

Classified and manufacturing accounts, 372. 
Family quarters, applications. 175. 344. 
Eire companies, volunteer. 224. 
Foundry operation, economy, 54. 
Fourth of July, holiday, 344. 
Gambling on Panama railroad property. 43. 
Good Friday, holiday. 248. 
Gorgona shops, master mechanic, 336. 
Holiday pay. silver employes, 408. 

November 3d, 79. 
Hourly gold men, employment, 320. 

Ice — 

Advance payments, 151, 160. 
Supply, reduction. 367. 
Injuries, compensation. 218, 224, 2S7, 367. 
Inspector of corrals, assignment. 216, 
I^a Boca, name changed to Balboa, 2S1. 
l,abor Day. holiday, 7. 
I^aborers— 

Injured contract, rate of pay. 287. 
West Indian, rate of pay, 272. 
I^uds expropriateti, account. 23. 
I^aundry— 

Baskets, return of. 1S3. 
Cristobal, notice to employes. 216. 
i,ay-over titue. rules. 13S, 344. 
I^eave — 

injury. Set' Injuries. 
Sick, certificate. 21S. 279. 

Vacation, rules, 71. 79, 111, 183, 197. 216, 263, 311. 
I.icenses, liquor. 2S7, 296. 336. 350. 
l.ocomotive engineers, rules. 32S, 350. 
I,ongevity, regulations. 344. 391. 
Machinery. French, use, 248, 279. 
Malingerers to be dismissed, 43. 
Manufacturing accounts and classified expendi- 
tures. 360. 367. 372. 
Manufacturing in shops, reduction, 27. 
Material and Supplies Division- 
Abolished, 7. 

Assistant Chief Quartermaster in charge. 11. 
Meal tickets — 

Deductions, 400. 
New form, 102. 
Meteorology and River Hydraulics- 
Abolishment of Division, 63. 
Division engineer, 27. [tendent. 7. 

Motive Power and Machinery, acting superin- 

Mechanical Engineer, acting, 400. 
New Orleans, passenger rates, 350. 
November 3d, pay, 79. 
Oil, use for fuel, 3S4. 
Overtime, pay. 328, 40S. 
Pacific Division- 
Acting division engineer, 279. 
Division Engineer, appointed, 27. 
Panama railroad- 
Attorney, 2S7. 

Baggage allowance and rules, 183, 408. 
Gambling on property. 43. 
Injured employes, compensation, 367. 
l,and clerk, assignment. 94. 
I.and rules, 94. 
Qualified crews, 175. 

Rates for employes to New York. 175, 240. 
Requests for work, 216. 
Special trains. 304, 311. 
Steamship reservations, 328. 
Superintendent, acting. 376. 
Tickets, new forms, for employes, 111, 138. 
Transfers, from I. C. C. 304. 
Vice-president, assistant to, 2S7. 
Panama, Republic of — 

Charges and creditsagainst, 263. 
Independence Day, 71. 79. 
Panamanians, employment, 159, 240, 251. 
Pay. holiday, 79. 40S. 

Overtime. 328, 408. 
Pay car, schedule, 151. 
Pay rolls- 
Amounts in United States currency, 191. 
F'lxamination of Accounts. 39. 
Plumbing, superintendent of, duties. 197. 
Police — 

Chief of. assignment. 2S7. 
First Lieutenant, assignment. 1S3. 
Porto Ricaus, preference, 119. 
Property — 

Accountable officers, list, 240. 
Accounting for, method, 30, 248. 
Lost or destroyed. 166. 175. 
Public Works, Superintendent. 360. 400. 
Purchasing agent, assignment. 11, 27. 102. 



Circulars- 
Quartermaster's Department — 
Accountable officials. 240. 
Depot Quartermaster, assignment, 39. 
Mail. 27. 

Property accounting, 30, 248. 
Transfer and assignment of District Quarter- 
masters, 7, 54, 119. 159. 175. 216. 279, 311. 
Quarters, family. 175. 344. 408. 
Reimhursetnent vouchers, regulations. 102. 
Requisitions, correspondence, 54. 
Reser\-oir. Rio Grande, waste of water, 263. 
Revenues. Collector of, acting. 304. 
Sanitation. Department of — 

Changes in organization, 3U. 
Chief Clerk, acting, 43. 
Chief Sanitary Officer, acting. 311. 
Shipments, request for rate and remission of du 

ties. 272. 391. . 
Shop employes, rules. 359. 
Stationery and supplies, requisitions, 304. 
Steamship reservations. 32S. 

Storehouses, transfer to division engineers. 39. 43. 
Subsistence Deiiartment — 

Headquarters, Cristobal, 27. 
Local purchases. 27. 
Subsistence Officer, assistant. 54. 224. 
Surcharges, percentages, 304. 375. 
Survey and Appraisal, board abolished, 39. 
Sun,'eying officer, assignment. 111. 328. 
Tax Collector. Balboa, moved to Ancon. 328. 
Telephone service, use and rates. 320. 
Thanksgiving Day, holiday. 94. 
Timekeeping instructions, 376. 
Transfer of employes, 11. 
Transportation — 

Business trip tickets. HI, 138. 
Coach hire, reimbursement. 367. 
Freight trains. 111. 

Panama railroad steamers, rates. 175, 240, 354. 
Public business. Ancon and Cristobal, 376. 
Sixty-trip tickets, 111, 216. 359. 
Twenty-four trip tickets. Ill, 151. 
United Fruit Company steamers, rates. 350. 
Treasurer, money transmitted, 311. 
Typewriter repairs, 128. 
United Fruit Company steamers, rates. 350. 
Veterinary service, private animals. 400. 
Wage classification, silver employes. 165, 175, 197, 
Water, use of, 263. 272. 311. [3S2. 400. 

Work, request forms. 359. 400. 
See a/so Congress, Bills and Acts of. 
See a/so Commission Decisions and Actions. 
See a/so Fixecutive Orders. 
Civil Administration. Department of — 
Accountable officers. 240. 
Bills against. 133. 251. 
Di\'isions of. renamed, 54. 
Executive Secretary, acting, 27, 391. 
Five years' progress. 316. [reports. 

See a/so Chairman and Chief Engineer, monthly 
Civil Service- 
Examinations. 5. 13, 30, 36. 43, 66, 170. 194. 347. 
Rules, 3. 106, 163,382. 
Secretary of Board, acting, 363. 
Claim officers- 
Acting. 27. 
Transfer of. 111. 
Clubhouses, Commission. See each issue. 
Coal- 
Amount consumed by steam shovels. 150, 183. 
Panama railroad. 170. 314. 
Cocoli Lake, ruins of old building, 395. 
Cold .storage- 
Articles and amount purchased. 70. 
Cristobal plant. 65. 89. 409. 
Fruits and vegetables. 2. 
Meats for Canal workers. 397. 
Colon- 
Breakwater. 46. 270. 377. 
Corral, new, opened, 106. 
Dock No. 1 enlarged, 329. 
F^lectricity. 265. 
Harbor, gas buoys. 161. 
Hospital. 65, 121. 

Playground for children, 399, 414. 
Public works under treaty. 46. 404. 
Quarters, Panama railroad, 59. 
Riot. 290. 
Sanitation. 310. 

Station, Panama Railroad. 65, 169. 369, 386. 388. 
Water supply. 52. 121. 401. 
Commerce and Labor. Department of, aliens going 

to the States. 388. 
Commissary — 

Buildings authorized, 34, 241. 

Cold Storage. See Cold Storage. 

Coupon books, issue. 119. 1S3, 197, 293, 320. 

Fish, fresh, purchased, 266. 

Five year^i progress. 308. 

Goods to be labeled. 210. 

Opening hours, 255. 304. 



Commissary — 

Prices. See each issue. 
Resolution by employes in favor, 158, 171. 
Sales and purchases, statement, 137. 
Supplies, bids, 33, 273. 
See a/so Subsistence Department. 
Commission Clubhouses, activities. See each issue. 
Commission decisions and action — 
Dentists, 50. 

Holiday pay, silver employes. 395. 
Leave of absence. 50, 90. 395. 
Medical fees, 288. 
Overtime pay, 395. 

Pay of Army. Navy, and other officers, 21. 
Pay of employe who dies on leave. 90. 
Quarters, family, of employe on leave, 395. 
Telegraph and telephone lines. 288. 
Transportation for employes, 154. 
Compressed air, plants, 69. 266. 313. 386. 
Comptroller of the Treasury, decisions — 
Injuries, compensation, 20, 63. 
Leave, annual, pay, 237. 
Concerts. I. C. C. Band. See each issue. 
Concession, first Panama Canal. 338. 
Concrete — 

Plants. 1. 10. 105, 170, 218, 249, 281, 329. 345. 
Rails for reinforcement, 337. 394. 
Rock for. See Quarries. 
Sand for. See Sand. 

Work. 82. 105, 233. 242. 281. 353, 364. 386. 
Conductors, Commission and Panama railroad, in- 
vestigation and findings. 170, 178, 354. 
Congress — 

Bills and Acts of— 

Appropriations. Sundry Civil Act. 346. 
Bond i.ssue. Tariff Act. 393. 
Deficiencies, 1909, 346. 

Injuries, compensation. 130, 154, 162. 210. 227. 
Lands, use. control and ownership, 226. 
Overtime and longevity, 305, 346. 
Urgent Deficiency, 393. 
House Committee on Interstate and Foreign Com- 
merce, visit. 130. 138. 150. 154. 
Visit of Congressional party, 266. 
Construction and Engineering. Department of— 

Accountable officers, 138. 240. [293-5. 

Cost of Canal construction, five years' progress. 
Cost, unit, of Canal construction. 149. 
Division of work, 27. 

Expenditures. 149. [reports. 

See a/so Chairman and Chief Engineer, monthly 
Consular Corps, directory, 70. 

Consulting Engineers. Board of, comparative esti- 
mates, 196, 202. 214. 222. 228. 
Contract for supplies, six months. 65. 
Corozal — 

Fire protection, IIS. 
Gardens, Commission, 306. 
Highway to Panama, 81. 
Malaria rate reduced, 46. 
Recreation hall. 394. 
School building. 58. 82. . 
Corrals — 

Buildings, new. 106. 162. 194. 
Charges for private work, 400. 408. 
Forage reiiuisition. 34. 
Grass used for feed. 138. 

Horses and mules, number and cost. 153, 201. 
Inspector, assignment. 216. 
Cost of Canal work — 

Estimates, comparative, by Board of Consulting 

Engineers and I. C. C. 196. 202, 214, 222. 228. 
Report of -Special Board of Engineers to Con- 
gress, 212. 
Under American control. 295. 
Unit. 145, 149. 
Coulson. Adolphus. appeal to Supreme Court, 98. 
Coupon books — 

Hotel and commissary, issue, 119, 183. 197, 320. 
Meal tickets, new form. 102. 
Courts- 
Justices appointed, 155. [ports. 
See Chairman and Chief Engineer, monthly re- 
See Police and Prisons, monthly reports. 
See Supreme Court. 
Cranes — 

Eight 20-ton, 369. 

Locomotive, number and distribution. 330. 
Cristobal — 

Bakery, improvements. 193, 266, 393. 

Cold .storage plant, 65. 89. 409. 

Dock, Panama railroad, new, 201, 276. 

Dry Dock. See Marine Shops. 

Electricity. 265. 

Fire protection. 117. 

Marine shop. See Marine shops. 

Quartermaster's office moved, 394. 

Sea front, protection, 321, 385. 

Storehouses. 39. 265. 

Sunday school. 53. 

Water supply, 52, 121. 401. 



INDEX, 



Crusher plants — 

Ancon. 169. 297. 353. 

Porto Bello. 5. 217. 261. 313. 
Culebra. Catholic Church, 6. 
Culebra Cut- 
Accident in. cars leave track. 282. 

Bridge at Empire. 209. 385. 

Compressed air system, 69, 266. 

Cross section. 294. 

Drainage, 2S4. 

Excavation. .Slf^ Excavation. 

Explosion, dynamite, 51. 411. 

First work. 362. 

Progress under American control. 293. 

Slides. 73. 265. 266. 377. 401. 

Steamshovels.methodof supplying with coal. 150. 

Transportation from, improving. 21. 

Widening, authorization. 1S5, 217. 
Culebra Island, quarantine station, 225. 297. 



Dairy Operations. Ancon. 334. 
Dam— 

Exca\'atiou. See Excavation. 

Gatuu — 

Cost, comparative figures, 215. 
Dredges making hydraulic fill, 361. 409. 
Experimental work, 2. 

Foundation and method of construction. 109. 
Height reduced. 209. 
Miniature model. 339. 

Progress of work. 81. 82. 147. 227. 253. 293. 385. 
Report of Special Board of Engineers, 212. 
Sinking of. press notices. 129. 150. 155. 
Stevens, John F.. letter. 153. 
Miraflores and Pedro Miguel — 
Cost, comparative figures. 222. 
Progress of work. 146. 236, 293. 321. 354. 
See a/ so Chairman and Chief Engineer, monthly 
reports. 
David, special rates, 397. 
Davis, Thomas F. B.. pardon. 319. 
Decoration Day. holiday, 311. 
Deficiency estimates, 126. 127. 129. 
Dentists, Commission. 50. 130, 141. 
Depot Quartermaster, a.ssignment, 39. 
Designing engineers, assignment. 11. 
Dickinson. Jacob M.. Secretary of War, visit, 282, 298. 
Diplomatic Corps, directory, 70. 

Directory— [392. 

Canal officials, 8, 48, 80. 104, 144. 176, 264, 312. 352. 
Consular Corps, 70- 
Diplomatic Corps. 70. 
Panamanian officials. 70. 
Disbursing office — 

Checks on New York Sub-Treasury, 159. 
Disbursing officer, assignment. 263. 
Gold coins, mutilated, warning against. 340, 347, 
Transfer of duties. 7. 
Transfer of funds. 36. • 

Treasury, Canal Zone, 51. 
Dispensaries, origin and work, 260, 
Diversion channels. 17. 65. 210, 2S4, 334. 
Docks- 
Balboa. 225. 242. 

Cristobal and Colon. 201. 276, 329. 369. 
Dry, See Marine Shops. 
Dogs, muzzling, 207. 
Drainage. Culebra Cut. 284. 
Dredge — 

Ancon, work at Atlantic entrance. 99, 
Buckets. American made, 225. 
Clam-shell for sand ser\'ice, 369. 
Culebra, at Pacific entrance. 83, 99, 107, 183. 
French- 
Equipment in ser\'ice, 12, 295. 
Found in Chagres River, 66. 113. 161. 
Marmot, rebuilt at Balboa. 89. 241. 283. 
Sixteen-inch suction converted into coal 

barge. 247. 
Sunken, encountered in Canal prism, 97. 
Suction, sunk at Nombre de Dios. 106. 
Supply tender, 409. 

Twenty-inch suction, new. for Gatun. 345, 
Dredgemaster. I,aurent Roquebert. 250. 
Dredging— 

Atlantic entrance. 2. 66. 99, 105, 107. 289. 294. 

Curiosities in excavation, 81. 

Hquipment. Atlantic and Pacific Divisions. 295. 

Gatun Dam. hydraulic fill. 361. 409. 

Gatun Locks. 106. 

Pacific entrance. 2. 57, 97. 99. 294. 338. 410. 

Records, monthly, 10, 42. 81. 82. 113, 155. 194, 226, 

250. 290. 343, 370.405. 
Sluicing and dredging. Miraflores. 339. [reports. 
See a/so Chairman and Chief Engineer, monthly 
See also Excavation. 
Drill barge, subaqueous excavation, 153. 345. 
Dry dock, Cristobal. See Marine shops. 



Dump cars — 

Arrival, 394. 

Contract for two hundred. 89. 

Cost of side doors, 121. 
Dumps — 

Central Di\'ision, 17. 253. 
Dynamite- 
Amount and price by years. 377. 378. 

Blasting supplies for fiscal year, 251. 

Explosions, premature. See Explosions. 

French, dug out by steam sho^'el. 34. 

Handling of. rules, 131. 

Magazines, 17. 43. 57, 

Meeting to discuss handling and use. 74, 131. 

Super\*ision, 131. 

Supply for fiscal year, 251, 377. 

Unloading, 57. 



Earthquakes, report of Board of Engineers, 212. 
Education, public. See Schools. 
Electric lighting system, extension. 113. 
Electric lights, economy. 320. [297, 329. 

Electric power plants. 9. 97. 113, 209. 261. 265. 266. 275. 
Emigration of laborers, decree of President of Pan- 
ama. 298. 
Empire — 

Bridge over Culebra Cut. 209. 385. 

Dedication of chapel, 6. 

Etnpire Christian League. 124. 

Fire protection. 117. 

Gardens, Commission. 306. 

Highway to Las Cascadas. 185. 401. 

Incinerating plant to be moved, 338. 

Shops, IS. 360. 

St. Mary's Church, 22. 58, 66, 
Employes- 
Age limit for reappointment. 272. 

Business trip tickets, HI. 138. 

Checks, brass, 207. 

Conditions of labor and housing. President's 
message to Congress. 138. 

Holiday pay, silver. 395. 408. 

Hourly, employment. 320. [287, 367. 

Injured, compensation. 20, 63. 130, 154. 162,210.224, 

Leaves of absence, rules, 50, 71. 79. 90. 97. Ill, 183. 
191. 197. 216. 237. 263. 311, 387. 395. 402. 

Longe\'ity pay. 121. 305. 344, 391, 402. 

Malingerers, 43, 

Medals for. See Medals. 

Medical treatment. 21. 

Nonclassified, civil service status. 382. 

Overtime pay. 305, 328. 395. 408. 

Pay of one dying on leave. 90. 

Politics and office holders, 3. 

Quarters. See Quarters. 

Rest house for colored. 394. 

Shipments, request for rate and remission of 
customs, 272, 391. 

Shop, rules, 359. 

Transfer. 11. 

Transportation. See Transportation, [400. 

Wage classification, silver. 165, 166, 175, 197. 382. 

See also Civil Service. 
Engine house and yard at Gamboa, 337, 395. [213. 

Engineers. Special Board, report to Congress, 209, 212, 
Equipment- 
Excavation, IS. 

Floating, cost, 12, 154. 295. 

Rolling stock and machinery, cost, 154. 

Repairs to rolling, 400. 
Estates, administration. 90, 387. 

See also Legal Notices. 
Estimates- 
Deficiency, fiscal year. 126-7, 129. 

Work and cost, comparative. Consulting Engi- 
neers and I. C. C. 185. 196. 202, 214. 222. 228. 
Examinations. Civil Service. See Civil Service. 
Examiner of Accounts- 
Acting, 304. 

Assistant to, 306. 

Instructions for Departments and Divisions, 39. 

Transfer of duties with Disbursing Officer, 7. 
Excavation — 

Atlantic entrance, 2. 66. 251. 353. 

Cardenas Hill removed. 137. 

Cost. unit. 149. 

Culebra Cut. 294. 

Diversion channel at Miraflores lock site. 193. 

Dredging, monthly records, 10. 42, 81, 82, 113, 155, 

194. 226, 250. 290. 343. 370. 405. 
Equipment. 18, 154.295. 

Estimates, comparative. 185. 196. 202. 214. 222,228. 
Gatun Lake. 179, 353. 39S. 
Lock. See monthly statement. 
Matachin. completed. 313. 339. 
Monthly statement. Sec each month. 
Panama railroad relocation. 303. 395. 
Rock, subaqueous. 23. 153, 212, 306. 345, 409. 
Sluicing and dredging, Miraflores. 339. 



Excavation — 

Steam shovels— [280. 351. 

Monthly records, 19.55, 95,142, 167.208. 256. 

Highest daily and monthly records. 11, 25, 

41. 54. 87. 93. 99. 106, 118. 126, 130. 159, 185, 

193. 196, 201. 218, 225. 234. 266. 278. 309, 327. 

Totals— 335, 370, 402. 

Monthly records. 1. 41, 73, 105, 145. 177.217. 249, 

289, 321, 353, 393. 

Monthly since American occupation. 4, 44,76, 

lOS, 145, 14.9. ISO. 220. 252. 292. 324. 356, 396. 

See aJso Chairman and Chief Engineer, monthly 

Executions. Hubert Stout, 98. [reports. 

Executive Orders — 

Administrative Districts. 298. 
Appeal, criminal cases. 101. 
Balboa. La Boca changed to, 2S1. 
Civil Ser\'ice rules. amendment. 106. 
Estates, administration. 3S7. 
Hospitals. Director of. office abolished. 306, 
Justices of Supreme Court, appointment, 155. 
La Boca, changed to Balboa, 281. 
Larceny punishable by imprisonment. 11. 
Murder, penalties. 414. 
Notaries Public, accounting. 71. 
Panamanians, employment, 137. 
Prisoners, good behavior allowances, 414. 
Railway safety appliance law, 173, 201, 347. 
Expenditures — 

Abstract of. monthly, form revised, 359. 
See Finances of the Canal. 
Experimental dam, Gatun, 2. 

Explosions, premature. 51. 67, 125, 129, 137, 145. 154 
155,210,378, 402, 411. 
Explosives. See Blasting supplies. Dynamite. 



Fighting. Prize, negro sentenced, 303. 
Filtration plants. See Water systems. 
Finances of the Canal — 

Allotments, transfer, 50. 

Appropriations, 346, 393. 

Bond issue for Canal construction, 393. 

Deficiency estimates, 126, 127, 129. 

Estimateof cost of Canal, 196, 202,214.222, 228. 

Expenditures and man\ifacturing accounte, clas- 
sified, 372. 

Expenditures, classified, monthly, 23. 5S, 107. 149. 
186. 210, 226. 258. 282. 314. 339. 387. 

Funds and method of disbursement, 325-26. 

Pay rolls, comparative statements. 231. 

Quartermaster's allotmentsand expenditures, 130, 
Fire protection. Division of^ 

Alarm boxes, 90. 

Companies and equipment. 117. 409. 

Five years' progress. 316-7. 

Volunteer companies. 224. [reports. 

See also Chairman and Chief Engineer, monthly 
Fish for destroying mosquito larvK, 340. 
Fish, purchase of. for hotels and messes. 266. 
Five years of Canal work — 

Construction and engineering. 293-5. 

Funds and method of disbursement, 325-6, 

Government, Ci^il. 316. 

Health and sanitation, 300. [308-9. 

Recruiting and maintaining the working force. 
Flat cars, improvements. 11. 
Floating equipment. 35. 154. 
Floods. See Freshets, 
Food supplies, proposals for. 128. 
Forage — 

Requisition for six months' supply, 34. 

Warehouse for. at Mount Hope. 162. 
Fossils, request of Smithsonian Institution, 401. 
Foundry — 

Accidents at Gorgona. 58. 

Operation, economy. 54. 
Fourth of July celebration, 237. 255, 267. 282. 319. 327. 
341.344, 348. 365. 368.371. 
Freight equipment. Panama railroad, increased, 161. 
French Canal at Balboa closed. 249. 
Freshets — 

Chagres River, interfere with work. 177. 337, 345. 

Predicting, method. 37. 
Frogs, switches and switchstands. 2. 
Fruits and vegetables, 2. 265. 



<3 



Gambling on Panama Railroad Property, 43. 
Gamboa, engine house and yard, 337, 395. 
Gardens — 

Commission, 306. 334, 

School. 221. 
Gatun— 

Clubhouse, Commission, 354, 386. 

Commissary, 10, 34. 241. 386. 

Dam. S^v Dam, 

Electric power plant. 9. 97. 209. 265. 275, 297. 329. 

Explosion on Panama railroad relocation, 378, 

Fire protection, 117, 409. 



L^ 



INDEX. 



Ga tun- 
Handling plant. 1, 10. 105, 218. 249. 281. 329. 377, 

Highway to Mount Hope, 10. 242. 282. 401, 

Hotel. Coniniission, enlartred. 338. 

Hotels, messes and kitchens, employes at. 21S. 

Uike, work from Gatun to Bas Obispo. 179. 267. 378. 

Locks. Sfe- Locks. 

Market, public. 393. 

Old and new. 391. 

Pumping plant for. 360. 369. 

Railroad station. 169. 

School building. 241. 

Ship basin, clearing. 266. 

Slide on relocated Panama railroad, 233. 

Spillway. See Spillway. 

Storehouse. 6. 43. 105. 

Train, shuttle, to Mindi. 234. 
Labor, to Culebra. 410. 

Water supply, new reservoir. 305. 
Goethals. Lieut. -Col. Geo. W. See Chairman and 

Chief Engineer. 
Gold coins mutilated, warning against. 340. 347. 
Gold Hill, height, 38. 
Good Friday, holiday. 248. 
Gorgon a — 

Cave-in at. 314. 

Fire protection. 117. 

Foundry operations, 54. 

Gravel pit, 137. 

Oil house. 314. 

Planing mill, extension. 338. 

Shops, work. 9. IS, 54. 5S. 273. 331. 336. 

Wreck, railroad. 2. 
Government of the Canal Zone. 316. 
Gravel pit, Gorgona. 137. 

H 

Hamburo-American S. S. Line, reduced rate to em- 
ployes. 21. 
Handling plants. .S^y Locks, 
Harbor, Cristobal-Colon, gas buoys, 161. 
Health and sanitation, five years' progress, 300. 
Health reports. St^e Department of Sanitation. 
Highways, Canal Zone, 46, 81. 185. 186. 209. 242, 282, 
Holiday pay, silver employes. 395, 408. [318, 401. 

Horses and mules, numberand cost. 153, 201, 
Hospital— 

Ancon, 242. 250. 

Colon, 65. 121. 

Director of. office abolished. 306. 

In.sane.3S9. 

Sick camps, hospitals and dispensaries. 260. 
Hostling locomotives. 77. 
Hotels. Commission — 

Cost of operating. 139. 

Coupon books, issue, 183, 197. 298. 320. 

Decrease in number of laborers at messes. 157. 

Fuel, light, and fixtures, 33. 

Gatun. number of employes eating at, 218. 3SS. 

Meal tickets, laborers. 102. 400. 

Ovens. 98. 

Subsistence problems, 139. 157. [reports, 

.Sr'^' (7/j(> Chairman and Chief Engineer, monthly 
Hydrophobia, recommendations. 3. 



I 



ICE- 



Advance payments, 151, 160. 

Storage house. 409-lii. 

Supply, reduction. 367. 
Incinerating plant, Empire. 338. [224. 227, 287. 367. 
Injuries, compensation. 20. 63. 1.^0. 154, 162, 210. 218, 
Insane asylum, Ancon, 389. 

Inler.stite Commerce Commission, inspector to pass 
on railroad equipment, 257. 



Jamaica, Vacations, 97. 
Judiciary. Canal Zone — 
.S^^ Supreme Court. 
Junk. French, .sale. 345. 403. 410. 
Jury trial, capital cases, 25, 98. 



La Boca, Sre Balboa. 
Labor- 
Cost of bachelor and married. 130. 

Force and quarters, monthly reports. 26. 58. 90, 
97, 122. 186. 194. 234. 27S. 306. 330. 378, 406. 
Labor Day. 7. 
Laborers — 

Checks, metal, new style. 175. [298. 

Emigration of. decree of President of Panama, 

Injured contract, rate of pay, 287. 

Meal tickets. 102. 400. 

Number in quarters and in bush. 139, 157. 

Recruiting. 225. 273. 308-9. 361. 394. 

Treatment of. contemplated action of Commis- 
sion. 274. 

Wages. 165. 175. 197. 382. 400. 

West Indian, rate of pay. 272. 

See Labor, force and quarters. 



La Guayra. health inspection. 362. 
Land — 

Act passed by Congress, use. and ownership. 226. 

Deeds taken, 58. 

Engineering, building construction and munici- 

pnl improvement, inspection, 161. 
Expropriated for lakes, account, 23. 
Panama railroad, 36. 94, 162. 
Landing stage, Balboa, 225. 
Landscape and garden work, 306. 334. 
Larceny, executive order, 11. 
Larvacide. manufacture on Isthmus, 394. 
Las Cascadas — 

Fire protection. 117. 
Highway to Empire. 185, 4D1. 
Laundry, 183, 216, 394. 
Lay-over time, rules, 138, 305. 344, 346. 
Leave, rules. 50. 71. 79. 90. 97. 111. 183. 191. 197. 216, 218, 

224, 237, 263, 279, 311, 387, 395. 402. 
Legal notices, 15, 24,72.79, 88.93,102. 111.119. 128,135. 
143. 151. 159, 168, 197, 207. 216. 223. 224, 232. 279. 287. 
296, 304. 399. 
Letters from the line. 3, 14. 18, 38. 51. 158. 174. 199. 230. 
Letters, misdirected. .S"^*' each issue. 
Levels, precise. sur\'ey, 14. 
Licenses, liquor, 287. 296. 336. 350, 410. 
Lidgerwood unloaders. monthly records. 90. 114. 162, 

194, 226. 279. 297. 322. 361. 402. 
Linion Bay — 

Breakwater. 47. 270. 377. 
High water in. 58. 
Lincoln's centenary celebration. 164. 170. 17S. 190. 
Liquor licenses. See Licenses. 
Locks — 

Accidents, precautions against, 340. 

Cement for. 17, 163. 

Cost, comparative estimates, 214. 222. 

Depth of water in, 42. 

Excavation. See Excavation, monthly. 

Gatun — 

Concrete work. 82. 105, 242, 281, 364. 
Dredging, 41, 106. 

p;iectric plant, 9, 97, 209. 265. 275. 297. 329. 
Floor and foundations, report, 364. 
Handling plant, 1, 10, 105, 218,249, 281.329,377. 
progress of work, 147. 297. 293. 329. 
Material for. awards. 377. 
Mirafiores and Pedro Miguel- 
Concrete. 387. 
Diversion channel. 193. 
Electric plant. 97, 209, 266, 329. 387. 
Handling plant, 170, 345. 

Progress. 9. 49. 146. 236, 281. 293, 321. 354. 387. 
Model on exhibition. 339. 
Rails for concrete reinforcement. 337. 
Sea level and locks, relative merits, 286. 
Special Board of Engineers, report. 212. [reports. 
Sec also Chairman and Chief Engineer, monthly 
Locomotives— 

For use in quarry at Porto Bello, 9, 81. 
Hostling, 77. 

Number owned by Commission, IS. 
Oil burning, 201. 
Water coolers, 330. 
Locomotive engineers, rules, 328, 350. 
-Lodge and club notices. Sec each issue. 
Longevity pay regulations, 121. 305. 344, 391. 402. 
Lost or destroyed property, forms, 175. 
Loud. Hon. G. A., inquiry regarding railroad trans- 
portation. 68. 
Lumber for Canal work. 361, 369, 401. 

M 

Machete Men at Gatun Ship Basin. 266. 
Machinery — 
Co.st, 154. 

P'rench- [161, 241, 247, 249. 250. 283. 

Dredges recovered from jungle. 12. 66. 89. 113, 
Use of. rules. 248, 279. 
Paraiso shop, distributed, 10, 
.S>v also Equipment. 
Magazines for explosives, 17.. 43, 57. 
Malaria and mosquitoes, 46. 
Malingerers to be dismis.sed. 43. 
Manuf.icturers' .\ssociation of Chicago, paper read 

by Chairman and Chief Engineer, 243. 
Manufacturing- 
Account, uniform plan of reporting. 360. 
Accounts and classified expenditures, 360.367.372. 
Reduction in shops. 27. 
Map- 
Central Division, topographic. 2. 
Chagres valley, 101, 241. 305. 
Police. 346. 
Marine Corps. See Camp Elliott. 
Marine shops — 
Balboa- 
Bolivar, repairs to tug, 283. 
Coal barge, 247. 

Description, 13. [247. 283. 410. 

Dredges, repaired and rebuilt. 12, 13, 89. 241. 
Gridiron, 90. 
.S"*'^ also monthly reports. 



Marine shops — 

Cristobal- 
Additions, 163, 329. 
Clapet. French, rebuilt. 281. 
Dredges. French. 12, 66, 113, 161, 289. 
Tug De Le.sseps, 330. 369. 
Sec also monthly reports. 
Market, public. Gatun. 393. 
Martinique, money order convention. 397. 
Matachin — 

Completion of cut. 313, 339. 

Dikes in cut blown up. 330. 

Explosion, dynamite, 145. 
Material, bills, 135. 
Material and supplies. Department of — 

Abolition, 7, 

Assistant Chief Quartermaster in charge. 11. 
Meal tickets, new — 

Deductions, 400. 

New forms, 102. 
Mechanical Division — 

Cars, dirt, repairs. 273. 

Clerical work at shops, 42. 

Cost of side doors for dump cars, 121. 

Hostling engines. 77. [reports 

See also Chairman and Chief Engineer, monthly 
Medals for Canal employes. 49,97, 121, 185. 187, 195, 
203, 211, 258, 266, 305, 310, 338, 393, 402. 
Medical treatment of employes, 21. 
Messes — 

European laborers'. 33. 

Subsistence problems, 139, 157. 

Sec also Subsistence Department. 
Meteorology and River Hydraulics, Division of — 

Abolition, 63. 

Arango, Ricardo M., letter to employes, 38. 

Division Engineer, acting, assignment. 27. 
Mindi— 

Excavation below sea level, 353. 

Explosions. 51. 67. 

Magazine for explosives, 17. 57. 
Mirafiores- 

Dams. Sec Dam. 

Electric power plant. 97, 209, 266, 329. 

Explosions, premature. 402, 411. 

Fire protection, 117. 

Handling plant, 170. 

Locks. See Locks. 

Oil tank, 266. 

Post-office, 41. 

Tunnel, railroad, 25, 33, 273,313. 
Money orders. See Posts. Customs and Revenues. 
Mosquito- 
Fish for destroying larvte, 340. 

Larvacide. manufactured on Isthmus, 394. 

Malaria, 46. 
Motive Power and Machinery, Division of— 

Mechanical Engineer, acting. 400. 

Superintendent of. acting. 7. 
Mount Hope- 
Corral and forage warehouse, 162. 

p-iltration plant, 121. 

Fire protection. 117. 

Highway to Gatun, 10. 242, 282. 401. 

Printing plant, 9, 153. 

Quartermaster's depot. 9. 49. 

Warehouse, forage, 162. 

Water supply. 52. 
Municipal Engineering and Building Construction — 
Inspection, report of committee. 161. [reports. 

.S>(" rt/.so Chairman and Chief Engineer, monthly 
Municipal improvements, cost. 46, 229. 
Murder, penalty. 414. 
Murders. 25. 46. 98, 123. 334. 402. 

N 

Nao.s Island Brkakwater, 17. 241. 329. 401. 
Navigating canals. lock and sea level. 286. 
Navigation in Canal, Pacific entrance, 193, 249, 410. 
Navy officers, pay. 21. 
Navy, visit of ships. 218. 

See also Pacific Fleet. 
NewOrleans, passenger rates, 350. 
New Years, holiday, 133. 
Nombre de Dios — 

Dredge, sunken. 106. 

History and description, 349. 

Sand service. 65. 161. 241. 253. 349. 

Tug service, 16. 24. 47, 102. 135. 395. [reports. 

See also Chairman and Chief Flngineer, monthly 
Notaries, public, accounting for fees, 71. 
November 3d, pay. 79. 



Oblsi-o Diversion. 17, 65. 210, 337. [reports. 

See also Chairman and Chief Engineer, monthly 
Obituary — 

Aldrich, L- E.. 242. 

Amador. Dr. Manuel. 282. 

Arango, Jose Augustin, 290. 

Balch. Maj. Lewis. \f. S. A., 411. 



INDEX. 



Obituary — 

Barbour. James W., 331. 

Barbour, John H.. 307. 

Beale. William. 116. 

Bieukowski. A.. 323. 

Curtin. Patrick. 134. 

DaWes, David R.. 51. 

Debardeleben. M. V.. 347. 

Eldridge. William C. 67. 

Gamble, Bert., 157. 

Gauthier, Joseph N., 262. 

Goodley. William. 51. 

Grant, Mrs. W. S., 398. 

Green, William D.. 411. 

Hague, Joseph, 390. 

Harper, G. H., 134. 

Higgins, H. H.. 291. 

House, Amos N., 141. 

Howland, F. C. 331. 

Humphey, Mrs. Harriet A.. 406. 

Kealy. Daniel, 299. 

Kingsley. Eugene H., 331. 

I^amb. William. 285. 

McFarland. A. Y.. 307. 

McKee. W. J.. 53. 

Mickle, I,ouis, IS. 

Miller, J. Inguard. 124. 

Miller. Robert, 291. 

Moore, Frank, 406. 

Morris. John R., 331. 

Murphy, James P.. 221. 

Petry. J. H., 157. 

Pumell. Dr. J. H..75. 

Rand, Charles, 46. 

Richards. R. I., 67. 

Rodman, Willis J., 210. 

Ryan, John, 379. 

Shuck, Mrs. F. E.. 116. 

Smith. Gordon Burton. 411. 

Townsend, Edwin. 36. 

Vanderstop. Paul. 45. 

Vanne. Charles. 100. 

Wagner. William. 32. 

Waldron. Frederick P.. 277. 

Weightman. Dr. Wra. M., 307. 

Whiteman. Philip M.. 262. 

Williams, Edward R.,411. 
Oil- 
Delivery and installation. 85. 266, 384. 

License granted Union Oil Company, 257. 

Locomotives, oil burning. 201. 

Pipe line changes. 322. 

Storehouse at Gorgona. 314. 

Unloading dock at Balboa. 5S. 97. 
Organization of Canal work, report of Board of Engi- 
neers to Congress. 212. 
Ovens for hotels and bakery, 98. 383. 
Overtime, pay. 305. 32S, 395. 403. 



Pacific Division— 

Ash lighter in channel removed, 395. 

Coal barge, dredge converted. 247. 

Cost, comparative estimates. 222. 

Dams. See Dam. 

Di^^sion engineer, 27. 279. 

Dredging. See Dredging. 

Drill barge and sounding scow for. 153, 345. 

Excavation. See Excavation totals. 

Five miles of Canal opened, 193. 

French canal closed, 249. 

Locks. .SV^ Locks. 

Navigation of Pacific entrance, 193, 249, 410. 

Office and storehouse, 39, 241. 273. [345, 409. 

Rock excavation, subaqueous. 23, 153. 193. 306, 

Rock for concrete, 169, 297. 353, 385. 

Sandandrepair wharf at Balboa, 242, 338. 

Sand service, 35, 41. 3S5. [shovels. 

Steam shovel records. See Excavation. Steam 

Storehouse at Balboa. 39, 241. 273. 

Supply tender. 409. 

Tug and steamer equipment. 35. [reports. 

See aho Chairman and Chief Engineer, monthly 
Pacific entrance, navigation in. 193,249.410. 
Pacific Fleet, visit. 74,98,107. 122. 141.205. 210. 
Packages, unclaimed. See each issue. 
Panama railroad- 
Attorney for. 2S7. 

Baggage, allowance and checking. 133, 322. 408. 

Balboa, port of. handling facilities and extent of 
trade. 182. 

Black Swamp, draining. 26. 

Business for fiscal year. 162. 

Car repairs, rules governing, 400. 

Coal, purchase and sale. 170. 314. 

Colors of equipment. 411. 

Commissary. See Commissary. [354. 

Conductors" investigation and findings. 170. 178. 

Cost, relocation, comparative estimates. 228. 

Cur\'es."eliminating. 155. 

Dock. new. at Cristobal. 201. 276. 



Panama railroad — 

Earnings, fiscal year. 173. 

Electrical department, consolidation with tele- 
graph and telephone department. .M. 
Employes, injured, compensation, 367. 
Equipment. 161. 295. 
Explosion of dynamite near Gatun, 378. 
Flag stops for Sunday night trains, 50. 
Flat cars, improvements, 11. 
Food supplies, proposals. 128, 
Freight equipment, increased. 161. 
Frogs, switches and switchstands, 2. 
Gambling prohibited. 43. 
Gatun and Mindi Junction shuttle train, 234. 
Hostling locomotives. 77. 
Injured employes, compensation. 367. 
Inspection by newspaper men, 51. 
Interstate Commerce Commission, inspector to 

inspect equipment, 257. 
Laborers, recruiting, 225, 273. 
Land, 94. 162. 
Loans, 229. 

Locomotives, oil burning. 201. 
Passes. See Transportation. 
Progress under American control, 295. 
Qualified crews on main line, 175. 
Quarters in Colon. 59. 
Rails, open hearth steel. 2S1. 
Raits, ties and fastenings, expenditures. 169. 
Relocation — 

Cost, comparative estimates. 228. 

Report of Board of Engineers, 212. 

Work on. 113. 137. 233. 267. 3C3. 395. 

See also Chairman and Chief Engineer, 
monthly reports. 
Requests for work, 216 

Safety appliance law extended to, 173. 201. 347. 
Sale of unclaimed packages. 111, 135, 350, 360. 367. 
Shaler, Col. J. R.,395. 
Signals, interlocking, 97, 283. 
Slides on. 34, 233. 
Special trains. 218. 290. 304. 311. 
Stations, new, 65. 169, 369. 386, 388. 
Steamships — 

Ancon and Cristobal. 338. 

Baggage for. checking. 322. 408. 

Business for fiscal year, 162. 

Colon, accidents. 27. 34, 397. 

Finance, sinking. 107, 114, 122. 137. 

Passengers for Cristobal. 345. 

Postage. 194. [313, 338. 

Purchase of Shawmut and Tremont, 121, 273. 

Rates for employes, 175, 240, 354. 

Reser\'ations. 314, 328. 

Sailings. See each issue. 

Staterooms, special. 397. 
Steam shovels on relocation work. 303. 395. 
Storage charges, 397. 
Superintendent, acting. 376. 
Switches, interlocking. 97. 283. 
Telephone ser\'ice and rates. 288. 320. 331, 410. 
Tenants, committee to hear complaints. 39. 
Thanks to volunteers on wrecking car, 370. 
Tickets. See Transportation. 
Ties, cross and switch. 7. 34, 289. 
Time table. 322, 335, 348, 406. - 
Traffic over, daily, 69, 236. 
Transfer of employes, 304. 
Transportation — 

Business trip tickets, HI. 138. 

Freight trains. 111. 

Passes for laborers and foremen. 216. 

Sixty-trip tickets. 111. 216. 359. 

Twenty-four trip tickets. Ill, 151. 
Tunnel at Miraflores. 25, 33. 273. 313- 
Vice-President — 

Assistant to, 287. 

Second. 314. 
Walking on tracks, warning. 10. 
Wrecks. 2. 10. 90. 
Panama. Republic of— 

Amador. Ex-President, death. 282. 
Arango. Secretary of Foreign Affairs, death. 290, 
Charges and credits against. 263. 
Currency, value. 278. 

Emigration of laborers, decree of President, 298. 
Engineering, building constniction. and munici- 
pal improvements. 46. 161. 
Episcopal missions. 309. 
Fourth of July celebration. 365. 
Improvement in suburbs of Panama. 314. 
Independence Day. 71.79. 

Officials, directory, 70, [United States. 46, 404. 

Public works, operation imder agreement with 
Sanitation, Panama and Colon, 310. 
Theater. National, opening. 67. 
Time changed. 266. 
Trade, statistics. 106. 
Treaty with United States. 227. 
Wesleyan Methodist Church. 235. 
Panamanians, employment. 137. 159. 240. 251, 262. 



Paraiso — 

Explosion, dynamite, 154. 

Fire protection. 117. 
Paving, cost. 46. 
Pay car — 

Accident, near Gorgona, 90. 

Schedule, monthly. 151. 
Pay rolls — 

Amounts to be in United States currency. 191. 

Economies. 231. 

Examination of accounts, instructions, 39. 
Pedro Miguel- 
Commissary, new, 34. 

Dams. See Dam. 

Fire protection. 117. 

Gardens, Commission. 306. 

Handling plant. 170,345. 

Locks. See I^ocks. 

Yard for bad order cars, 46. 
Personals. .Siveach issue. 

Pettit. William, convicted of embezzlement. 310. 
Photographs, progress of Canal work. 115. 
Piece-of-eight, Spanish coin, 331. 
Piers. See Docks. 
Piles, preserved by water. 161, 
Plague, decrease in infected ports. 21. 
Planing mill. Gorgona. extension. 338. 
Playground. Colon. 399, 414. 
Plumbing. Superintendent of, duties, 197. 
Police and Prisons, Di\nsion of — 

Chief of. assignment, 170, 193, 287. 

First Lieutenant, assignment, 183, 

Five years' progress. 316-7. 

Map of Canal Zone. 346. [298, 343, 363. 411- 

Monthly reports. 18. 50.82. 114, 163. 186, 227, 260. 

Porto Bello. Zone police. 250. 
Politics and officeholders. Civil Ser\'ice rules. 3. 
Porto Bello— 

Commissary, new, 34. 

Compressed air plant. 69. 

Crusher plant, rock. 5. 217, 261. 313. 

Electric power plant. 261. 

Locomotives for quarry, 9,81. 

Police. Zone. 250, 

Uuarr>'. work. 5, 9. 81, 217. 261, 313. 

Quarters, new, 313. 

Reservoir, 313. 

Shop, machine, equipment. 261. 

Slide. 105. 

Tug sen-ice schedule. 16. 24. 47. 102. 135. 395. 

Village, description, 5. 

Wireless station, 225, 257, 401. 
Porto Ricans. 119. 
Posts. Customs and Revenues. Division of— 

Collector, acting. 304. 

Employes, meeting. 395. 

Five years' progress. 316-7. 

Letters, misdirected. See each issue. 

Liquor licenses granted, 287. 296, 336, 350, 410. 

Money orders — 

Convention with Martinique, 397. 

Post-office. Miraflores, 41. [298, 330. 402. 

Reports, monthly. 25. 49. 89. 121. 161, 193. 225. 265, 

Revenue operations, 32. 410. 
Printing plant. Mount Hope. 9. 153. 
Prisoners, good behavior allowances. 414. 
Property — 

Accountable officers. 240. 

Accounting, method. 30. 248. 

Lost or destroyed, 166, 175. 
Proposals — 

Building. 164. 171,207. 240. 248. 255,272, 279. 2S7. 
2%. 303. 320. 336. 350. 376. 391. 397, 40S, 416. 

Food supplies. Panama railroad. 128. 

Ties, cross and switch. 7. 
Public works- 
Superintendent of, assignment. 360, 4O0. 

Under agreement with Panama, 404-5. [reports. 

See also Chairman and Chief Engineer, monthly 
Pumping plants. 322. 361. 369. 
Purchasing agent, assignment. 11. 27, 102. 

Q 

Quarantine Station. Culebra Island. 225, 297. 
Quarries— 

Ancon Hill. work. 169. 297. 353. 385. 

Porto Bello. work. 5. 9, 81. 217. 261. 313. [reports. 

See also Chairman and Chief Engineer, monthly 
Quartermasters Department — 

Accountable officials. 240. 

Allotments and expenditures. 130. 

Ancon office moved. 378. 

Assistant chief. 11. 

Auction of public animals, 54. 68. 

Balboa office. 409. 

Buildings, construction and repair. 263. 320, 355. 

Changes, 311. 

Clerks from Material and Supplies, 17. 

Contracts for supplies. 65. 

Corrals, Sec Corrals. 

Cristobal office moved. 394. 



8 

Quartermaster's Uepartment— 
Depot at Mount Hope. 9. 49. 
Depot Quartermaster, assignment, 39. 
District Quartermasters, transfer and consolida- 
tion. 7. 54. 119, 159, 175. 216, 279, 311. 
I/»bor force and quarters, monthly reports. 26, 58, 
90. 97, 122. 1S6, 194, 234, 278, 306. 330, 37S, 414- 
Se^ also I^-xborers. 
Mail for, 27. 

Material and Supplies. Division. 7. 11. 
Price list. 33. 

Property accounting, method, 30. 248. 
Quarters. Sff Quarters. 
Salary rating. 33. 
Seed, for distribution. 73. 130. 153. 
Storehouses, transfer to Division Engineers. 39. 43, 
Telephone directory, 39. 

Work extended to Mount Hope and Cristobal. 43. 
.Sec a/i(J Chairman and Chief Engineer, monthly 
reports. 
Quarters — 

Bachelor, family, occupants. 2S6. 
Family — 

Applications for, 58, 175. 266. 344. 402. 
Held during leave of absence. 395, 408. 
Five years' progress. 308. 

I,abor problems. 157. (306. 330, 378. 414. 

Monthly reports. 26. 58. 90. 97. 122. 186. 194. 234. 278. 
New. 33. 257. 

Occupants, average family. 170. 
Panama railroad, at Colon, 59. 
Quinine, amount used. 282. 



Rails — 

Concrete reinforcement. 337, 394. 

Open hearth steel for Panama railroad, 281. 

See also Supplies. 
Rainfall, tables. Sfe each issue. 

Si'€ alio Freshets. 
Recreation hall. Corozal. 394. 
Recruiting — 

Agent fined. 339. 

Maintaining the force, 225. 273. 308-9. 361. 394. 
Red Cross Society. Canal Zone Branch. 157. 164. 171. 
ISS. 197. 198. 215, 235.254,267,299,315.341.348,371. 
Reimbursement vouchers, regulations. 102. 
Relocation work on Panama railroad. See Panama 

railroad. 
Requisitions, correspondence. 54. 
Reser\'oirs. See Water systems. 
Reven\ies. See Posts. Customs and Revenues. 
Riot. Colon. 290.319. 
Rivers, correct designation. 361. 
Roads. Srr Highways. 
Rock excavation, subaqueous — 

Pacific Division. 23. 153. 193. 306. 345. 409. 

Report of Board of Engineers, 212. 
Roosevelt. President — 

Culebra Cut. 185. [gress. 209. 212. 

Engineers, special board, report submitted to Con- 
Executive Orders. See Executive Orders. 

Messages to Congress, 9. 129, 138, 209. 

Thanksgiving proclamation, 83. 



Safety Appliance I^aw. 173. 201. 347. 
Sale of public animals. 54. 68. 175. 183. 232. 256.287.398. 
Salvation Army, work, 358. 
Sand for locks and dams — 
Chame. 34. 41. 385. 

Nombrede Dios. 65. 161, 241. 253, 349. 
Taboguilla Island. 306. 
Wharf at Balboa. 242. 338. 
Sanitation. Department of — 
Accountable officers. 240. 
Changes in organization. 311. 
Chief Clerk, acting, assignment, 43. 
Chief officer, acting, assignment. 311. 
Director of Hospitals, office abolished. 306. 
Health and sanitation, five years' progress. 300. 
Health reports, monthly. 21.50.82. 122. 155. 194. 
Hydrophobia, recommendations. 3. [223. 227. 

Lar\'acide. manufacture. 394. 
Panama and Colon, sanitation. 310. 
Quinine, amomit used. 282. [reports. 

See also Chairman and Chief Engineer, monthly 
Santa Crnz dump. 17. 
Schools — 
Public- 
Buildings, new. 58. 82. 241. 401. 

Composition, prize, at Cristobal, 399, 

Enrollment. 42, S3. 259. 

Five years' progress. 316-7. 

Grading and difficulties. 259. 

Report of Superintendent. 123. 

Superintendent, 34. 

Teachers, assignment. 42. 

Teachers' meetings. 42. 83. 114. 154. 259. 

Work of last year and future plans. 357. 
Sunday. See Church work. 



INDEX. 

Scow, sounding, for subaqueous rock excavation. 345. 

Scrap, iron and steel, sale. 345. 403. 410. 

Screening of quarters, cost, 163. 

Sea level and lock canals, relative merits, 286. 

Sea level, mean, 14. 

Seeds, vegetable and flower, distribution. 73. 130. 153. 

Sen-ices, bills. 133. 

Sewer. D street. Colon, report of Committee. 406. 

Shaler. Col. J. R.. information regarding. 395. 

Ship basin, clearing ground for. at Gatun, 266. 

Shipments, request for rate and remission of cu.s- 

toms.272.391. 
Shipways. See Marine shops. 
Shop employes, rules governing, 359. 
Shops. See Marine shops. See also Various villages. 
Sick camps, origin and %vork, 260. 
Slides. 34. 73. 105. 233. 266. 314. 377. 401. 
Smithsonian Institution, request for fossils, 401. 
Soap, manufacture, at Ancon laundry. 394. 
Social life of the Zone. See each issue. 
Spillway. Gatun — 
Cement for. 17. 

Concrete work. 82, 233. 281, 353. 386. 
Excavation. See Excavation totals. 
Progress of work. 147. 353. 386. [reports. 

See also Chairman and Chief Engineer, monthly 
Spoil, utilizing. 253. 

Stationery and supplies, requisitions. 304. 
Stations, Panama railroad, 65, 169, 369. 386. 388. 
Steamships — 

Arrivals and departures at Balboa. .Stveach issue. 
Hamburg-American Line. See Hamburg-Amer- 
ican Line. 
Panama railroad. See Panama railroad. 
Sailings. See each issue. [pany. 

United Fruit Company. See United Fruit Com- 
Steam shovels-^ 

Coal for. 150, 183. 
Loading record, 65. 
Number, 18. 

Panama railroad, relocation work, 303. 395. 
Records- 
Daily andmouthly.il. 25.41.54.87.93.99. 106. 
lis. 126. 130. 159. 185. 193. 196. 201. 218, 
225, 234. 266. 278. 309. 327. 335. 370. 402 
Monthly, since American occupation. 19,55. 
95. 142, 167, 208, 256. 280, 351. 
See also Chairman and Chief Engineer, monthly 
reports. 
Steel, structural, specifications. 98. 
Stevens. John F., comments on Gatun Dam. 153. 
Storehouses. 6. 39. 43. 105. 241. 273. 
Storm, wind, on south slope of Isthmus, 365. 
Subsistence Department — 

Bakery. Cristobal, improvements, 193, 266. 393. 
Bread, pastry and cake, amount consumed. 415. 
Cold storage articles, amount purchased. 70. 
Commissary. See Commissary. 
Fruits and vegetables, 2. 265. 
Headquarters moved to Cristobal, 17, 27. 
Hotels and messes, report. 139. 
Improvements, 193. 
Labor problems. 139. 157. 
Local purchases authorized. 27. 
Ovens, experimental, hotels, 98. 
Purchasing agent, assignment. 11. 27, 102. 
Storehouse for cereals and miscellaneous sup- 
plies, 265. 
Subsistence officer, assistant and acting. 54. 224. 
Supplies. 33. 273. 

Unit for Cristobal cold storage plant. 65. 89. 409. 
See also Chairman and Chief Engineer, monthly 
reports. 
Sunday Schools. See Church work. 
Sundry CiWl Act, 205, 346. 
Supplies — 

Six months' contract, 65. 
Standard, bids for. 257. 
Supreme court— [Constitution. 98. 

Decision of. Canal Zone not under United States 
See also Courts. 
Surcharges, percentages, 304. 375. 
Survey — 

Canal Zone, triangulation. 394. 
Chagres watershed. 101. 241. 305. 
French canal between Cristobal and Gatun. 233. 
Leveling of precision. 14. 
Trinidad watershed. 241. 
Survey and Appraisal, board abolished. 39. 
Surveying officer, assignment. Ill, 328. 
Switches, interlocking. Las Cascadas yard, 97. 



Tabernilla. work from, to Gamboa. 43. 

Taboga Island, launch service. 10. 241, 255. 

Taboguilla I.sland. sand, 306. 

Taft. President- 
Address before Federation of Women's Clubs, 181- 
Address before Red Cross Society, 188-9, 
Inaugural address. Canal worK- 225. 



[273. 297, 370. 
, 113, 154, 186, 226, 



Taft, President- 
Speeches on Canal work, 204, 205. 209. 
Visit to Canal Zone, 130. 146, 169. 178, 185. 
Tariff Act. authorizing bond issue. 393. 
Ta.x Collector's office. Balboa, moved to Ancon, 328. 
Teachers. .S>^ Schools. 
Telegraph and telephone — 

Agreement between Isthmian Canal Commission 

and the Panania railroad. 288. 
Culebra Island, extension. 297. 
Improvements. 331. 410. 
Ser\*ice and rates. 320. 
Temperature. Sec Weather reports. 
Thanksgiving. President's proclamation, 83. 94. 
Theater. Panama National, opening. 67. 
Tide tables. See each issue. 
Ties, cross and switch. 7. 34. 289. 
Timekeeping, instructions. 376. 
Time. Republic of Panama, changed. 266. 
Time Lable. Panama railroad, 322, 335, 348, 406. 
Tivoli Hotel, rules for employes, 178, 190. 
To^ving fleets, vessels. 35. 
Towing machines, installation. 289. 
Track shifters, monthly records, 81, 
Trade statistics, Panama. 106. 182. 
Trails. See Highways. 
Transfer of employes, 11. 
Tran sporta tion— 

Central Division, improving, 21. 
Coach hire, no reimbursement. 367. 
Employes, new form. Ill, 138. 
Freight trains, HI. 

Hamburg-American rates to employes, 21. 
Problem, reply to Hon. C. A. Loud, 68. 
Public business, carriages, 376. 
Rate allowed employes. 154. [350. 354. 

Rates to New Orleans and New York, 175. 240. 
Reduced rate requests, 272. 
Sixty-trip tickets, requests. 111, 216, 359. 
Twenty.four trip tickets. 111, 151. 
Traveling engineer, assignment, 376, 400. 
Treasury, Canal Zone — 
Establishment. 51. 
Money transmitted. 311. 
Treaty, United SUites-Panama, 227. 
Trinidad, watershed, survey, 241. 
Tug— 

Bayano River Lumber Company's overdue, 398. 
Equipment, Atlantic and Pacific Divisions, 35. 
French, to be rebuilt. 330. 369. 
Service to Porto Bello and Nombre de Dios. 8, 16, 
24.88. 102. 135, 190,395. 
Tunnel. Miraflores. 25. 33. 273, 313. 
Type of Canal, report of Board of Engineers, 212. 
Typewriter repairs, 128. 

u 

Union Oil Company— 

License granted, 257. 

Office moved to Petrolia, 390. 

Unloading dock at Balboa, 58, 97. 

See also Oil. 
Unit cost of Canal work, 145, 149. 
United Fruit Company- 
Accommodations at New Orleans, 340. 

Cartago ashore, 98. 

Rates to New Orleans, 350. 

Sailings. See each issue. 

Steamers will not stop at Puerto Barrios. 213. 

Steamships, new, 387. 



Vacation. See Leave. 

Veterinary ser\'ice. private animals, 400. 

\A/ 

Walk across the Isthmus, record. 330. 
Water systems. municipal- 
Canal Zone supply, 52. 

Cost. 46. 404-5. 

Filtration, Colon and Cristobal, 121. 

Improved system for Ancon and Balboa, 377. 

Pumping plants, 52, 322, 369. 

Rates for service, 311. 

Reservoirs, 33, 52, 65. 297, 305, 313. 

Waste. 263. 272. 
Watershed — 

Chagres River, survey. 'lOl. 305. 

Trinidad, survey. 241. [283, 322. 398. 

Weather reports, monthly, 42. 74, 114. 152. 178. 218, 250, 

See also each issue. 
Whar\'es. See Docks. 
Width of the Canal. 185, 212. 217. 218. 
Wireless telegraph. Porto Bello station. 225, 257, 401. 
Work, request forms. 359. 400. 
Wrecks, Panama railroad. 2, 10. 90. 



Yellow fever, decrease in infected ports, 21. 
Y. M- C. A. See Commission Clubhouses. 



CANAL 




RECORD 



Volume II. 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEiMBR 2, 1908. 



No. 1. 



The Canal Record 



Published weekly under the authority and supervision of the 
iSTHIMlAN CANAL COMMiSSiON 

" The Canal Record"' is issued Jree qf chaise one 
copy each, to all employes of the Commission and Pan- 
ama Railroad Company 7vkose names are on the "gold" 
roll. Extra copies can be obtained from the news 
stands of the Panama Raihoad Com pan y for Jive cents 
each 

Address all Communications 

THE CANAL RECORD 

Ancon, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama, 

,V(J communication, either Jor publication or request- 
ing injof'mation, will receive attention unless signed 
with the J lilt name and address of the writer. 



NOTES OF PROGRESS. 

August Excavation. 

The grand total of excavation during the 
month of August was 3,252,506 cubic yards, 
all of which, except 100,035 cubic yards, 
was taken from the Canal prism. This is 
83,666 cubic yards more than the hi.ghest 
previous record for excavation in the rainy 
season, that of July, 1908, and 227,764 cubic 
)-ards short of the highest record, that of 
March, 1908. There were 26 working days 
in August, the same number as in July. Of 
the grand total of August excavation 1,876,515 
cubic yards were dry excavation and 1,375,991 
by dredges. 

The average rainfall in August for the ter- 
ritory in which excavation is in progress 
was 11.91 inches, as compared with 11.14 
inches in the previous month, and with 12.27 
inches in August, 1907. 

In the .Atlantic Division the excavation was 
842,788 cubic yards, of which 130,263 cubic 
yards were taken from the locks' site at Ga- 
tun, 57,999 from the spillway, and 638,217 
cubic yards b_v dredges. Compared with 
Juh', the steam shovel excavation was 32,303 
cubic yards less, largely because excavation 
in the spillway of Gatim Dam is practically 
finished, and one shovel was taken off the 
work at Mindi, while the spoil tracks were 
being lowered. Of the total excavation by 
dredges 638,217 cubic yards were taken out 
of the Canal prism in Limon Bay, and this 
is the highest record ever made by the 
Colon dredges. 

In the Central Division the excavation was 
1,540,610 cubic yards, practically all of 
which was taken out by steam shovels. As 
compared with July, this is 73,528 cubic 
yards more. The old Culebra division is now 
Culebra section of the Central Division, and 
the amount excavated in this section was 
1,171,927 cubic yards, 50,602 more than in 
July, 1908, and 385,061 cubic yards more than 
in August, 1907. In the old Chagres divi- 
sion, now Chagres section of the Central 



Division, all previous records were broken 
by an excavation of 3t3S,6S3 cubic yards. 

All previous records were broken in the 
Pacific Division by an excavation of 859. 108 
cubic yards. Of this amount the dredges 
took out 737,774 cubic yards, while the dry 
excavation amounted to 131,334 cubic yards. 

.\ detailed statement of the excavation in 
the three divisions follows: 

ATLAMTIC DIVISION 



Locality. 



From I Outside | Total 
Canal ! Canal ! excava- 
Pri.sm j Prism ; tioti 



Df-y excavation- 
Gatun spillway... 

Gatun locks 

Mindi 



cu. yds. I cji. .I'rfs. 1 (■», yds. 



57,999 

130,263 

16,309 



130.263 
16,309 



Total. 



tl'ff i^.rcai'ation — 
Colon dredging 



638.217 



',999 I 204,571 
63S,217 



Total, wet and dry 
excavation 


784,789 : 


57,999 


842,788 


CENTRAL DIVISION 


All dry excavation — 

Chagres section 

Culebra section 


1 
366,810 
1,133,153 


1,873 
38,774 


36S,6S3 
1,171,927 


Total 


1,499,963 


40.647 


1,540.610 


PACIFIC DIVISION 





Dry e.vcavation — 

Miraflores locks 

Pedro Miguel locks.. 
Cardenas Hill 



91.065 ! 
21.203 

17.677 



375 91.441] 

1,014 22,217 

17,677 



Total . 



129.945 



// V/ e.vcavaiio»- 
l.a Boca 



1,389 131,334 

i 
' 737.774 



Total, wet and dr>- 
excavjition 



867,719 



1,389 



S69.10S 



TOTAL EXCAVATION, ENTIRE CANAL 



Dry excavation.. , 
Wet excavation .. . 



Total. 



1,776,4«0 100 
1,375,991 : 



,035 I 1,876,515 

....' 1,375,991 



3.152,471 1 100,033 3,252,506 



Rainfall in August. 

The rainfall for August, 1908, was not 
uniform over the Canal prism. The .Atlan- 
tic Division had an excess of 1.15 inches 
over the average for the month. The Cen- 
tral Division had a decrease oi 1.50 inches 
from the average for the month. The Pacific 
Division had an excess of5.6S inches over the 
average for the month. At Alhajuela, on 
the upper Chagres, the excess over tlie 
monthly average was 2.85 inches. The rain- 
fall at Bohio for the month was one of the 
heavnest recorded for .August covering a pe- 
riod of 38 years. The previous records have 
been: 

Cristobal August, 18S3 25.43 inches 

Cristobal August, 1890 20.51 inches 

Cristobal .August, 1894 23.03 inches 

Gatun .August. 1895 24. 12 inches 

Bohio ;... August, 1S97 25.20 inches 

Bohio .\ugust, 1898 33.31 inches 

Bohio .\ugust, 1901 24.25 inches 

Bohio .\ugust. 1908 20.50 inches 

Alhajuela August, 1906 26.10 inches 

The rainfall at Bohio on .Augu-st 7 was the 
heaviest for one shower recorded on the 



Isthmus since the American occupation. Be- 
tween 2.30 and 5.30 in the afternoon, 7.62 
inches fell. 

Maximum recorded during the mouth; 

Fivt: min. Ten min. One ht: 

.\ucon. .\ugust 7 64 

La Boca, .\ugust 7 63 

Pedro Miguel, .\ugust 27 56 

Bohio, August 7 61 

Porto Bello, August 7 64 



August Rainfall 



station. JQOf,. 1007. 

.■iltantie Dh'iston — 

Cristobal 18.31 1S.S<' 

Brazos Brook 16.25 17.51 

Gatun 16.37 

Bohio 9.U2 9.10 

Central Division — 

Tabemilla 11.34 

,San Pablo 10 98 

Bas Obispo 12.20 

Gamboa 11.33 12.69 

Empire 12.24 11.24 

Camacho Dam.... 12.02 12.17 

Culebra 12.97 11.81 

Rio Grande 12.61 11.41 

Pacific Division — 

Pedro Miguel 

I.a Boca 7.53 8.63 

.\ucon 6.43 7.46 

Upper Chasres — 

Alhajuela 26.10 10.67 



1.20 




2.89 


1.24 




3.28 


l.Ot 




3.30 


1.15 




4.50 


1.18 


ears 


3.77 


hree Y 






Av'ge 


No. 


,„,o since 
"""^- station 


of 

rainy 


cstabd. 


days. 


16.89 


15.22 


26 


18.19 


17.32 


27 


16.22 


18.90 


27 


20.50 


15.76 


28 


11.02 


U.IS 


24 


10.70 


10.84 


24 


10.23 


10.02 


26 


11.84 


12.46 


26 


8.11 


10.74 


24 


8.28 


10.82 


22 


7.74 


10.73 


26 


7.65 


10.83 


26 


9.31 




2.^ 


10.48 


7.27 


21 


11.4.S 


7.34 


21 



Contract for Gatun Cable-ways. 

.\ contract for the cableways of the mate- 
rial and concrete handling plant for the Ga- 
tun Locks has been let to the L,idgerwood 
Manufacturing Company of New York, for 
$309,000. This contract includes one single 
unloading cableway and two duplex unload- 
ing cableways for the docks, and four du- 
plex cableways for the locks. 

The lowest bid received was that of the 
Balance Cable Crane Company, which was 
informal, no bond having been .given when 
the bid was made. The plant which the 
company offered did not comply with the 
specifications and was unsuited to the work. 

The next lowest bidder was the New York 
Cableway and Engineering Company. Its 
lowest bid of .S277,800 offered motors for the 
important part of the work, which were evi- 
dently too weak. .Another of its bids, 
.S299,975, remedied the defects in the lowest 
bid, as to the motors, Ijut offered other parts 
of the mechanism which did not seem suit- 
able for the work. 

The S. Flory Manufacturing Company of- 
fered a bid of .^278,400, but the bid was 
somewhat irregular, in that the total figure 
did not agree with the total obtained by add- 
ing the different items, that total being 
.S295,340. But apart from this informality, 
certain parts of the mechani.sm were such 
that the guaranteed capacit\- of the unload- 
ing cableways was small as compared with 
the capacity of the mechanism guaranteed 
by other bidders, and to accept the bid 
would evidently have cost the Government 
more by [reason of slow operation than it 
would to accept the bid of another bidder. 

The most favorable bid offered for the 



THE CAiNAL RECORD 



NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



iContinited) 



Government was that of the Lidgerwood 
Manufacturing- Company, at 5309,000. Upon 
the recommendation of a committee con- 
sisting of Ivieut.-Col. H. F. Hodges, Maj. 
Wra. L. vSibert, and Mr. Geo. D. Brooke, it 
was determined to accept the last named bid. 



Mindl Work at Sea Level. 

Excavation at Mindi is down to sea level 
for practically the whole length of the chan- 
nel. This work extends from the old French 
canal at Mile .5 through the Mindi hills, a 
distance of half a mile, and the channel 
will be 500 feet wide at grade. Most of the 
excavation is in argillaceous sandstone. 
Steam shovel work was begun there in July, 
1907, and up to August 1, 560,474cubic yards 
had been taken from the prism at this point. 
There yet remain to be excavated about 
1,000,000 cubic yards. It was the original 
intention to take the excavation down to 
, below sea level with steam shovels, break- 
ing up tlie remaining rock with numerous 
blasts of dynamite and then taking the rock 
out with dipper dredges. This plan was 
adopted because it was not thought feasible 
to keep the excavation below sea level dry 
enough for steam shovels. Experience with 
the pumping at Santa Cruz and Matachin, 
where the work has advanced without inter- 
ruption throughout the rainy season, has 
led to the decision to continue the steam 
shovel work at Mindi below sea level. With 
this end in view a sump is being dug at the 
north end of the cut and is already down IS 
feet. Two old French 10-inch centrifugal 
pumps, belt-driven by two old French en- 
gines, have been installed and it is believed 
they will prove equal to every demand made 
by the rainy season and by seepage from the 
sea and the old French canal. A small 
stream of water is flowing into the sump at 
16 feet below sea level, apparently from the 
sea, but it is not so large that any difficulty 
is anticipated in keeping the cut free from 
water from this source. A track for the 
dirt trains is being put in at sea level and 
a parallel track will shortly be put in at 
a lower level, so that the shovels will not 
be interrupted by the lowering of the tracks, 
made necessarv by the progress of the exca- 
vation. Two steam shovels will be continued 
at the work for the present. 



Gatun Dam Work. 

The second experimental dam at Gatun 
has been finished and 85 inches of water has 
been turned on to the south, or upstream 
toe. This represents the 85-foot head against 
Gatun Dam, as the experimental dam is on 
a scale of 1 to 12. Sand was pumped into 
this dam from both the upstream and down- 
stream toes, with the result that the finer 
particles of silt were deposited about half- 
way between the toes, forming a core of fine 
impervious material at the center of the dam. 
Although the experiment is not completed, 
the progress so far made shows that the 
seepage through this dam becomes regularly 
less as the water advances toward the center, 
until it is almost nothing at the core. 

The borings on the site of the Dam are 
practically complete, and the test pit, which 
is down to 90 feet below sea level, will prol)- 
ably not be sunk to a much greater depth. 
The recent developments merely confirm 



the conclusion based on investigations at an 
earlier period, that the foundation is satis- 
factory. .\ report in detail has been made 
to the Chief Engineer. 

The .second tier of the trestling has been 
completed along the rock ridge of the south 
toe of the Dam at elevation 45, and is rap- 
idly being filled with rock from Bas Obispo, 
rock and earth from Mindi, and the excava- 
tion from the lock sites and the 'spilUvaj-. 
Excavation in the spillway has been com- 
pleted and the shovels are now at work 
cleaning up. 

Topographic Map of Central Division. 

A base line 3,028 feet long has been accu- 
rately mea.sured on level ground at Empire 
and monuments have been set at each end. 
Monuments have also been established for the 
summits of all hills within 4,000 feet of the 
Canal on each side between Bas Obispo and 
Pedro Miguel. These, together with the 
base line, will form a system of triangula- 
tion, and the correct altitude of each monu- 
ment will be determined from levels run 
from existing monuments. Stadia surveys 
w^ll then be tied onto thetriangulation mon- 
uments and the Canal and Panama railroad 
lines, so that a correct contour and topo- 
graphic map can be made of the territory 
surveyed. These surveys are being made at 
times when engineers are not busy with Ca- 
nal work, so that no additional men are em- 
ployed to do this work. Tlie map will be 
started soon, and when completed will show 
the general topography, such as hills, 
streams, reservoirs, houses, Canal and rail- 
road lines- on a scale of one to five thousand . 

Cutting Into Banks at the Terminals. 

At both the Atlantic and Pacific ends of 
the Canal the dredges have begun to lessen 
the distance between the two oceans. In 
Limon Bay two dipper and two old French 
ladder dredges are working their wav into 
the bank toward the Mindi Hills. They are 
excavating coral and blue rock to a depth of 
20 feet. As the channel is being made 
through the dry land, the rock is blasted in 
advance, and up to the present no subaqueous 
blasting has been necessary. These dredges 
will be followed by the sea-going suction 
dredge Ancoii, which will work in the mud 
below the rock strata, and carry the chan- 
nel down to 40 feet. 

h.1 ha. Boca, the Pacific end of the Canal, 
ladder dredge No. 14, one of the old French 
dredges, has been moved to a point opposite 
the end of the Panama railroad wharf, and 
is at work on the we.st bank, opening a 
channel 14 feet deep at low tide. The sea- 
going ladder dredge Gop/wris widening the 
first cut in. the reef at the entrance to the har- 
bor and when this work is finished will join 
dred,ge No. 14 in cutting the channel into 
the main land. The two will be followed by 
the sea-going suction dredge Ciilcbra, which 
will lower their cut to a depth of 45 feet at 
mean tide. 



Fresh Fruit and Vegetables. 

.After September 12, cold storage deliveries 
from New Orleans to the Subsistence De- 
partment on the Isthmus will be made every 
week instead of once in ten days, as hereto- 
fore. This saving of three days will make 
it possible to keep a better stock of fruits, 
and also to replenish the vegetable supply 
more frequently. The Carta,s:o, which arrived 



August 27, brought 30 boxes of lemons, 5 
tons of onions, 100 bunches of leeks, 5 bushels 
of okra and 1.000 watermelons. The Advance 
which arrived .August 29, l)rought one ton of 
lettuce, one ton of tomatoes, 20bu,shelsof cu- 
cumbers, 400 dozens of green corn, 2,000 can- 
taloupes, and 20 barrels of apples. There 
are due on September 2, one ton of lettuce, 
100 bunches of celery, 20 tons of cabbage, 
4 tons tomatoes, Vj-ton carrots, 20 bushels 
cucumbers, 60 tons potatoes, 1/2-ton beets, 
Va-ton summer squash, 500 pounds cauli- 
flower, 50 crates cantaloupes, 80 crates 
peaches, 20 barrels apples. There are due on 
September 8, one ton lettuce, 200 bunches 
celery, 20 bushels cucumbers, 25 dozen green 
corn, 100 pounds green lima beans, 15 crates 
cantaloupes and 50 crates peaches. 



Frogs, S-wltches and Switchstands. 

R. Budd, chief engineer, Panama railroad; 
A. S. Zinn, Resident Engineer, Central Di- 
vision, and E. J. Banta, mechanical engi- 
neer, have been appointed a committee to 
prepare standard specifications for frogs, 
switches and switchstands. It is probable 
that two grades will be provided, the bet- 
ter grade for the Panama railroad main 
tracks and ballasted tracks of the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission, and the second 
grade for side tracks and spurs on the Pan- 
ama railroad and the temporary tracks on 
Canal work. 



Wreck at Gorgona. 

Engine 604, drawing a loaded train of 
Ividgerwood flats, ran into the rear of a train 
drawn by engine 206 at Gorgona at 4.20 
o'clock on the afternoon of August 28. En- 
gine 604 was thrown off the track and over- 
turned and two cars were derailed. The 
engineer and fireman crawled out of the 
overturned locomotive unhurt, and no one 
was seriously injured in the wreck. One 
thousand five hundred dollars will cover the 
damage done to locomoti\'e and cars. Al- 
though the loss is slight and the injuries 
almost negligiiile, this wreck is noteworth)- 
because it is the first time in seven months 
that an engine of the Central Division has 
been overturned, on the main line, although 
dirt trains are run within sight of one an- 
other eight hours a day. 



Flood Stages in th« Chagres. 

Maximum height of Chagres dbove low 
water for the week ending midnight, Au- 
gust 29, 1908 ; 





Stations. 






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Heiiiht of low water 












above mean sea 














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92 


46 








Maximum height 




above low water: 












Sunday, Aug. 23 .... 


.69 


1.88 


2.25 


6.05 


2.40 


Monday, Aug. 24.... 


.90 


1.55 


2.00 


5.55 


2.04 


Tuesday, Aug. 25... 


.85 


1.80 


2.30 


5.50 


2.50 


Wednesday, Aug. 26 


,52 


2.01 


3.10 


5.45 


1.70 


Thursday. Aug. 27. 


.55 


2.85 


3.50 


4.30 


1.90 


Friday, Aug. 28 


.80 


1.69 


2.75 


6.60 


1.90 


Saturday, Aug. 29.. 


.72 




2.75 


6.34 


2.05 



The work of stopping the crevices in the 
side hills in Comacho reservoir has been 
finished and the reservoir is now filling with 
water. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



HYDROPHOBIA. 

Recotnmendatioas of the Sanitary Depart- 
ment in Regard to It. 

Rabies or hydrophobia is a fatal infectious 
disease, transmitted by the bite of a rabid 
animal. It is most common among dogs, 
cats, cattle and horses, in the order named, 
although many other animals are liable to 
the disease, and when so diseased all may 
transmit it to man in biting. Precautions 
should be taken therefore against bites from 
any such animals. 

When a dog is becoming rabid it is no- 
ticed by those who are familiar with him 
that his character has rather suddenly al- 
tered. A lively dog mopes and is depressed. 
A dull and quiet dog becomes restless or 
affectionate. 

About 85 per cent of dogs developing 
rabies become restless, excited and more 
or less vicious and furious, their voice is 
altered and they sooner or later show some 
tendency to rush about tearing and biting 
whatever is in their way. They will bite 
their master or any other person and will 
bite and swallow pieces of wood, clothing, 
glass, nails, etc. During this stage the dog 
may travel long distances biting dogs and 
other animals and thus spreading the dis- 
ease. Later the dog becomes paralyzed, the 
paralysis generallv appearing first in one or 
both of the hind legs. The jaw drops, sa- 
liva drools from his mouth and his ej'es 
are staring. He soon becomes quite ex- 
hausted from his fury and from the spas- 
modic contraction of muscles, becoming 
completely prostrated before death. 

The remaining 15 per cent become par- 
al\-zed almost without anj- symptoms of ex- 
citement. These dogs creep into some dark 
corner and die in two or three days. 

Rabies in the dog lasts usually four or five 
days, but the course of the disease may be 
as short as two or as long as ten days. 

The period betvi-een the receipt of a bite 
and the development of symptoms in a dog 
is usually one to two months. The period 
may, however, be greatly prolonged, even to 
twelve months, so that the period of quar- 
antine for dogs should be at least twelve 
months. 

If a person is bitten by a dog that subse- 
quently — within two or three days — develops 
symptoms of rabies, that person is in dan- 
ger of contracting the disease, because a 
dog's saliva is virulent, /. e., contains the 
virus of rabies two or three days before the 
.symptoms of excitement, etc. , appear. 

The dog's saliva being virulent at this 
period and during the period of active symp- 
toms, precautions should be taken to pre- 
vent saliva from the dog's tongue or mouth 
getting into a fresh cut or abrasion on one's 
hand or other exposed part. 

Wounds made hy rabid animals should be 
treated immediately by cleansing with very 
warm water, followed by careful cauteriza- 
tion with a hot iron or carbolic or nitric acid 
under the direction of a physician. 

A. person bitten by a rabid animal shoxild 
immediately present himself for the Pasteur 
preventive treatment for hydrophobia, or 
make arrangements fortakingthe treatment 
in some one of the institutions in the United 
States. Any delay may be attended by the 
gravest danger. 

A dog or other animal suspected of having 
rabies should, when it is possible, be closely 



confined and kept under observation for 
ten day.', because if rabid it will certainly 
die within this period. 

.\11 animals bitten by a dog suspected of 
having rabies should be confined until the 
results of microscopic examination of the 
dog's brain are known, when if negative, 
the}' may be released — if positive, destroyed 
or quarantined. 

// is of the greatest importance that all 
dogs suspected of being rabid and known to 
have bitten persons or animals should be 
confined and kept under obseji'ation; if that 
be impracticable the dogs should be killed, 
and their bodies sent immediately, or packed 
in ice and sent as soon as possible, for di- 
agnosis to the Board of Health Laboratory , 
Ancon Hospital. 

Under no circumstances should dogs or 
other animals, suspected of having rabies, 
be destroyed by burning or burial until it 
has been positively asceiiained that no per- 
sons or animals have been bitten. 

When it is certainly known that the sus- 
pected dog or animal has not bitten persons 
or animals the dog or animal may be de- 
stroyed, preferably by burning and imme- 
diate burial. 

Rabid dogs should not be shot through 
the head as that interferes with subsequent 
examination of the brain. 

During the past ten months rabies has 
spread to several places in the Canal Zone, 
from Panama to Mount Hope, so that every 
one should regard straj- dogs, cats and other 
animals with suspicion as possible conveyors 
of the rabid virus. 



LETTERS FROM THE LINE. 

Labor Day at Empire. 

The Can.vl Record: 

The mechanics of Empire and the rest of 
the Zone respectfully invite all white 
employes of the Isthmian Canal Commis- 
sion and Panama railroad to take part in 
the picnic and dance to be given at Empire 
September 7, 1908. A band will play good 
music day and night. Refreshments will 
be served all day long, some good speakers 
will speak briefly and to the point, and at 
night there will be a dance. The morning 
exercises will include a parade and athletic 
games, and in the afternoon a baseball game 
will be played between the boilermakers and 
machinists. Special trains will be arranged 
for to accommodate people from along the 
line who wish to stay for the dance. \ 
ticket entitling the holder and his family, 
or his lady friends, to admission, both to 
the games and to the dance are being sold 
at $2 gold a piece bv the following commit- 
tee: L. H. La None', R. W. Cook, H. Sur- 
tees, Chas. Poultney, G. M. Earle, Patrick 
Kelly, V.'illiam Fox, J. W. Fein, all of Em- 
pire shojjs. 

R. W. Cook, 

Secretary. 
Empire, C. Z., August 28. 



A Masonic Stag Party. 

The C.inal Record: 

The Empire Masonic Club will hold a 
stag party and entertainment on Septem- 
ber 9, at the new fraternal hall at Empire. 
The entertainment will con.sist of selections 
by local talent and after it is over a smoker 
will be held at which refreshments will be 
served. The entertainment will begin at 
7.30 o'clock in the evening. Brothers let 
the good spirit move you. Don't fail to 
attend. 

Entert.\inment Committhe. 

Empire, C. Z., August 29. 



OFFICEHOLDERS AND POLITICS. 

Warning Against Political Assessments 
and Partisan Activity. 

.W. the request of the United States Civil 
Service Commission, publicity is given to 
the following abstract of a pamphlet pub- 
lished by that Commission relative to politi- 
cal assessments and the partisan activity of 
officeholders: 

Persons in the employ of the United .States Gov- 
ernment while retaining the right to vote as they 
please and to express privately their opinion on po- 
litical subjects shall take no active part in political 
management or political campaigns. 

Employes of the Isthmian Canal Commission will 
be subject to discharge for political activity. 

The following forms of activity have been 
held to be forbidden by the provisions of law: 

Ser\-ice on political committees; ser\'ice as delegates 
to county. State, or district conventions of a political 
party, although it was understood that the employes 
were not "to take or use any political actix-ity in go- 
ing to these conventions, or otherwise \nolate the 
civil sen-ice rules:" continued political activity and 
leadership; the publication of a newspaper in the in- 
terests of a political party; holding office in a club 
which takes active part in political campaigns and 
management; the circulation of petitions having a 
political object; seri'ice as a commissioner of election 
in a community where it was notorious that a com- 
missioner of election must be an active politician; ac- 
cepting nomination for a i!olitical office mth inten- 
tion of resigning from competitive service if elected. 

Existing laws in the United States pro- 
vide as follows: 

Xo person in public ser\'ice is for that reason un- 
der any obligations to contribute to any political fund, 
or to tender any political ser\'ice and will not be re- 
moved or otherwise prejudiced for refusing to do so. 
No person in s;iid service has any right to use his 
official authority or influence to coerce the political 
action of any person or body. 

No officer or employe of the United States Gov- 
ernment shall discharge, promote or degrade, or in 
any manner change the official rank or compensa- 
tion of any other officer or employe, or promise or 
threaten so to do, for giving or withholding or neg- 
lecting to make any contribution of money or other 
valuable thing for any political purpose. 

No officer or employe of the United States Govern- 
ment shall directly or indirectly give or hand over to 
any other officer or employe any money or other val- 
uable thing on account of or to be applied to the pro- 
motion of any political object whatever. 

No person shall, in any place occupied in the dis- 
charge of official duties by any officer or employe of 
the United States Government, solicit in any manner 
whatever, gr receive, any cqntribution of money or 
other thing of value for any political purpose what- 
ever. 

Any person who shall be guilty of Wolating any of 
the above provisions shall be guilty of a misde- 
meanor, and shall on con\-iction thereof be punished 
by a fine not exceeding S5,000, or by imprisonment 
for a term not exceeding three years, or by such fine 
and imprisonment both, in the discretion of the 
court. 

Liquor Saloons Closed Labor Day. 

It is ordered and directed, by the Isthmian 
Canal Commission, that all. saloons and 
public drinking places is the towns of Las 
Cascadas, Empire and Culebra, be closed, 
and that no liquor be sold by them between 
the hours of 12 m., Sunday, September 6, 
and 6 a. m., Tuesday, September 8, 1908. 
Geo. W. Goeth.als, 

Chairman. 
D. D. Gaillard, 
Wm. I,. Sibert. 
Jo C. s. Blackburn, 
W. C. Gorgas, 
Members of the Isthmian Canal Commission. 
Xote: Civil Engineer H. H. Rousseau and 
Mr. Jackson Smith, members of the Com- 
mission are absent in the United States. 
Culebra, August 27, 1908. 

The best record for excavation in one day 
in the Central Division during August was 
made August 28, when 60,210 cubic yards, 
car measurement, of rock and earth were 
taken out. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



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THE CANAL RECORID 



PORTO BELLO. 

Village, Quarry, and Crusher Plant. 

Two million j-ards of crushed rock will be 
required for concrete in the locks at Gatun 
and t'-e spillway in Gatun Dam. To sup- 
ply this rock a quarry is being opened at 
Porto Bello, a harbor on the Caribbean Sea, 
eighteen miles east of Colon. Primarily the 
reason for selecting this place was that the 
rock here, a massive andesite, is well .suited 
for concrete, while the quantity is practi- 
calh' unlimited, enough, in fact, not only 
for the works at Gatun, but also for a break- 
water at the .Atlantic entrance to the Canal, 
if it be deemed wise to build one. An ex- 
ploration by means of borings justifies an 
estimate of 20,000,000 cubic yards of good 
rock. Other considerations were that it is 
within 25 miles of Gatun, nearer than any 
other suitable deposit, water transportation 
is cheap, the harbor at Porto Bello is unex- 
celled, and the rock can be sent from the 
quarry to the crusher, and from the crusher 
to the conveying system by gravity, and, 
therefore, the handling expense will be light. 

Porto Bello proper is a native settlement 
of some four hundred people, located on a 
land-locked bay one and a half miles long 
and half a mile wide, and in Panamanian ter- 
ritory. A survey made in 1903 by a detail from 
the U. S. S. Atlanta, shows a depth of from 
5 to 15 fathoms in practically all the harbor. 
Where the Commission dock has been built 
the water is from 2V^ to 4 fathoms deep. 
From the sixteenth century until the build- 
ing of the Panama railroad this was the 
Atlantic port for overland traffic across the 
Isthmus. The old pack trail joined the 
Cruces trail at Cruces, where also the water 
traffic up the Chagres from Fort I^orenzo 
was transhipped. Some ruined forts on 
both sides of the bay attest that the Span- 
iards at an early date thought the port well 
worth guarding, A more modern fortress 
on the south shore, next to the native town, 
bears the date 1756. Near this fort are three 
churches, one still in u,se and another bear- 
ing marks of recent con.struction. The third 
is a ruin, but not even the sight of pigs 
wandering contentedly around its courtyard 
can divest of beauty the loggia with its dozen 
arches. 

The quirries are being opened on the hill 
that ris s almost sheer from the water, on 
the north shore of the bay, well inside the 
harbor, and nearer the sea than the Ameri- 
can settl2ment. At an ele.-ation of 85 feet 
a 45-ton steam shovel is digging a terrace 
around t!ie hill for the douUe track system to 
the crusher hoi.' ?. E.xcavation for the crusher 
plant, and grading fcr the railway track into 
the quarry is in progress. This shovel was 
lifted from sea leve! up an incline 120 feet 
long, on part of which the grade was 66 per 
cent. A track was laid up the hill, an anchor- 
age or "dead man" was buried at th.e top of 
the incline, and a double cylinder, double 
drum hoisting en ,',ne of 30 rated horsepow- 
er, located at the f lot of the hill, supplied 
the power, use being made of an eight-part 
tackle. 

At an elevation of 260 feet above sea level 
a Decauville railroad is in operation, dis- 
tributing material along the 3,500 feet of 
hillside that it is proposed to strip. Mate- 
rial is sent to the 260-foot level by a trolley, 
operated by a hoisting engine at the foot of 
the hill. Stripping will be done hydrau- 



lically, and to this end a 10-inch hydraulic 
line has been run from elevation 4 to eleva- 
tion 260, and 3,500 feet along the terrace at 
elevation 260. On the steep incline the pipe 
is anchored in concrete piers about 150 feet 
apart. A pump capable of delivering 1,500 
gallons of water per minute against a total 
stack and friction head of 460 feet has been 
installed on the shore, with an intake from 
the bay. Steam for this pump will be fur- 
nished by two boilers of 370 rated horse- 
power, now ready for operation. 

From the quarry, running from elevation 
85 to 260, rock will be delivered at the crusher 
plant at elevation 85. This plant will con- 
sist of two No. 9 and four No. 6 McCuUy 
crushers which are now on the ground ready 
for erection. A double transmitting pan-con- 
veyor will take the crushed rock from the 
crusher to a hopper beneath the shipping 
bin located on the water line. This hopper 
empties into a double distributing iiucket- 
conveyor which elevates the crushed stone 
and delivers it, by means of trippers, at the 
points desired in the bin. Foundations have 
been installed for the bin and coal bunkers. 
The stone bin will havea capacity of 2,400 cu- 
bic yards and the coal bunkers of 1,000 tons. 
From the bin the stone will be loaded b%' 
gravit}' onto the barges. Twelve barges and 
three tug boats will be employed in the serv- 
ice between Porto Bello and Cristobal. Rach 
barge will carrj'600 cubic yards of rock, and 
it is intended to deliver ultimately 2,400 cu- 
bic 3'ards per day. Delivery will be begun 
by January 1, 1908. 

At present the drilling is being done b) 
Star drills, but as soon as one air compressor 
is installed, pneumatic drills will be used. A 
permanent 6-inch air line has been laid at 
elevation 260 to supplj- air to all parts of the 
quarry. A 2-inch water supply line is also 
being laid to elevation 288. Tanks \\4th a 
capacity of 10,000 gallons will be erected at 
this elevation and kept filled by pumping 
from the water main. From these tanks the 
quarters above the reservoir level will be 
supplied by gravity, as w-ill steam shov- 
els and drills in the quarry from a line laid 
at elev.ation 260. A 25-ton derrick has been 
erected on the dock. 

Between the hill in which the quarry is 
being opened and the hill that forms one 
side ofthe reservoir, is a shelf of land 2,000 
feet longand onl\-a few feet above the water. 

On this shelf are located the docks, the 
boiler and engine house, .shipping bins, 
coal bunkers, a machine shop, storehouse 
and other buildings that form the quarry 
plant. At a point where the shelf is a few- 
hundred feet broad, the Commission village 
is located. Besides the manufacturing plant, 
it consists at present of six barracks for la- 
borers, a mess kitchen for colored laborers, 
and a European laborers' mess, a type 5 
hotel and bachelor quarters, a type 18 bach- 
elor quarters, a tent hospital, and on a hill 
looking down on the village on one side 
and into the reservoir ravine on the other, 
four type 14 houses and three type 17 houses. 

The population on August 15 was 612, of 
whom 8 were nonemployes. There are 
three families, 80 gold emplo}"es, 190 Eu- 
ropean laborers, 60 East Indians and 260 
negro laborers. 

Operations at the quarr_v had been in pro- 
gress several months when the sanitation 
work was begun in January, 1908. Malaria 
of a virulent type had become recurrent. In 



the week ending May 18, the number of ma- 
laria patients sent to the hospital was 9.9 
per cent of the population, and in the week 
ended August 15, the percentage had 
dropped to l.i. The type of malaria has 
become less severe and the number of recur- 
rent cases is small. This improvement was 
brought about by establishing good latrines, 
piping water from a temporary reservoir in 
the hills and boiling it, cleaning the settle- 
ment of brush and using oil to prevent the 
breeding of malaria-carrying mosquitoes. 
A good sewer system has been installed and 
all of the buildings in use have already been 
connected with it. 

To furnish a permanent supply of whole- 
some water a concrete dam of the gravity 
section type has been built across a moun- 
tain stream. This dam, 46 feet wide at the 
base, 258 feet long at the crest, and 77 feet 
high, crest 105 feet above sea level, founda- 
tions running down to elevation 28, and 
containing 5,052 cubic yards of concrete, 
was built in 37 days. The force engaged.in 
its construction was divided into two sec- 
tions of 50 men each, one section being at 
work in the sand and gravel pit loading cars, 
and the other in mixing and placing the con- 
crete. The sand and gravel were dredged 
from the bay and pumped ashore to a bank. 
From here it was shoveled into Decauville 
cars and hauled up the tramway to a point 
above the mixing platform, the cars in trains 
of four or five being hauled by a hoisting en- 
gine stationed at the top. The gravel bank 
elevation was about -f 5. and the cars were 
dumped from elevation 110. From the dump- 
ing platform the material was shoveled over 
a 1-foot bulkhead on to a set of double 
screens arranged one above the other. The 
sand passed through the upper screen, and 
sand so fine as to be unsuitable for concrete 
work passed through the lower screen and 
was wasted down the hill . The gravel passed 
over the upper screen, and the materials 
were mixed in proper proportions on the 
mixing plaWorni at elevation 88.5. A Chi- 
cago cube concrete mixer of two-thirds of a 
yard capacity was used. Water is supplied 
by gravity to all the buildings in tne village 
except the family quarters located on a hill 
above the reservoir, which are supplied by 
pumping. The reservoir has a capacity of 
27,000,000 gallons, and is now full of water. 

Examination for Hxaminer of Accounts. 

The Isthmian Civil Service Board will hold 
in the office of the Chairman at Culebra, 
at 9 a. m., September 3 and 4, 1908, an ex- 
amination for the position of Examiner of 
Accounts under the Interstate Commerce 
Commission, at salaries ranging from ;Jl, 800 
to |)3,000 per annum, and traveling ex- 
penses. This examination is open to citi- 
zens of the United States who have had 
high grade training and experience in rail- 
road accounting. An advertisement contain- 
ing a description of the examination and 
other information of interest to applicants 
has been posted in every post-office in the 
Canal Zone. 

The printed application form can be had 
upon application to the Secretary of the 
Isthmian Civil Service Board, office of the 
Chairman, Culebra, Canal Zone. 

A stack 100 feet high, 6 feet in diameter, 
made of 1-4 and 3-16-inch steel, was raised 
at the new air compressor plant at La Boca, 
August 27. It was built on the ground and 
raised in one piece. 



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



PERSONAL. 



COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES. 



Women's Clubs and Other Features. 

The Empire Woman's Club opened the 
season with a resjular meeting on September 
1. The line of work for the coming year 
has been divided into the following depart- 
ments: Educational and philanthropic, with 
Mrs. A. Hillennen and Mrs. .\sh as chair- 
men; home and social, Mrs. E. P. Worral 
chairman, with Mrs. H. C. Ball assistant. 
The home and social department is large 
and has been df\-ided into several subde- 
partments. 

The meeting on Tuesday opened with a 
reading of the club creed, followed by a talk 
on extravagance versus economy, at the 
close of which there was an address hiy 
Mrs. Lorin C. Collins, president of the Zone 
Federation, who was the gue.st of honor. 
Several musical numbers were given. Sub- 
sequent meetings will be held every Tues- 
day at the clubhouse at 3 o'clock. The 
musical and literary department has charge 
cf the meeting September S, and the edu- 
cational and philanthropic department on 
the 15th. .\ reception will probably be given 
to the returning president, Mrs. F . W. 
Miracle, on September 22. 

The Las Cascadas Woman's Club has de- 
cide<l to hold its meetings at the residences 
of the members for the next three months, 
instead of taking a recess for that period, as 
was suggested. The meetings are much en- 
joyed and the interest in the club keeps up 
to the wofk. .-M the last session, held Au- 
gust 27, at the residence of Mrs. Charles 
Lingo, 19 members were present. The club 
greatly regrets the loss of its president, 
Mrs. O. Cj. Randall who has removed to 
Empire. 

Work on the new church and lodge build- 
ing is rapidly going forward and club 
women are anticipating pleasant quarters 
when it is completed. A committee of 
members of the club was asked to name a 
site for which they had prefer Ace and their 
choice was the site decided upon. 

The .^ncon Woman's Club holds its regu- 
lar meeting Wednesday, September 2. The 
principal business w^ll be the nominating of 
officers for the annual meeting, the fir.st 
Wednesday- in October. 

The Culebra Woman's Club is scheduled 
to open its regular season on Thursday, 
September 3. 

A dance, given by the nurses of Ancon 
Hospital in the"Anconcita" Saturday night, 
.August 29, was enjoyed b}- about 50 couples. 
The .Ancon orchestra furnished music and 
refreshments were served. 

The Tivoli Club will give a dance at the 
Hotel Tivoli, September 12, in honor of 
President-elect Josd Domingo de Obaldia 
and Mrs. Obaldia. 

Concert. 

By the I. C. C. B.iiid at the Hotel Tivoli, Ancon, Snn- 
day. September 6, 190S. at 7.30 p. m.: 

rKUGRAM. • 

1 March— .Sa/«/(' to the Ffaa Pierson 

2 .Selection — The Grand Mosul I^uders 

3 Flower Song — Dclicia Frautzen 

4 Waltz — Hauntins Eyes Tobani 

5 Duet for Clarinets — Naniue Marsiil 

.MESSRS. OKAY AND HALE. 

6 Selection — Maritana Wallace 

,- <(7 Caprice — The Whistler and His Dog Pryor 

Kb Bolero — Spanish Gaiety Eno 

8 Overture — Ij I Were King .-Vdara 

9 Descriptive — A Hunting Scene Bucalossi 

10 March — Arbitrator Bagley 

Chas. H. iBj<yiNGS, Musical Director. 
A concert will be given at Gorgona, C. Z.. on Sep- 
tember 13. 



Commissioner H. H. Rousseau, accompa- 
nied by his wife and mother, are due to ar- 
rive on the .-[//iainii, September 2. On the 
same ship are also Hiram J, Slifer and two 
daughters, and M. B. DePutron, .Assistant 
to the Chirman. 

Mr. George D. Brooke, Superintendent of 
Motive Power and Machinery, left on his 
vacation in the States on .August 30. 

Mr. Caleb M. Saville, assistant engineer, 
left on his vacation August 30. On his re- 
turn Mr. Saville will be stationed at Culebra. 



Dedication of Chapel at Empire. 

The dedication of the Commission Protes- 
tant chapel at Empire took place under the 
auspices of the Empire Christian League 
on Sunday, .August 30, at 2.30 p. m., a Sun- 
da}' school rally having been held on the 
morning of the same day. Both services 
were largely- attended. Rev. J. H. Sobe\', 
resident chaplain, was in immediate charge 
and visiting clergymen were Archdeacon 
Bryan and Rev. J. L. Wi.se. Among the 
speakers were Hon. H. A. Gudger, A. L. 
Stuntz, J. C. Forman and A. Bruce Minear. 
Musical selections were given by Mrs. .Adolf 
Faure and the Lotus Glee Club. This is 
the fifth of the Commission "type church 
and lodge" buildings to be completed. The 
others are at Cristobal, Gorgona, Paraiso, 
and Culebra. 

The Empire Christian League was organ- 
ized ill January, 1908. It is entirely unde- 
nominational and visiting ministers are 
privileged to conduct the services, in form 
as well as in doctrine, according to their 
own judgment and discretion, and at the 
close of any public service are permitted to 
gather the members of their own denom- 
ination together for any special ordinance of 
their faith. The resident chaplain officiates 
at all the services save one Sundaj- in the 
month, when a visitor is in charge. The 
Sunday school and Young People's Christian 
Union are under the supervision of the 
League, and all the literature provided in both 
is, as far as practicable, undenominational. 



Church at Culebra. 

The corner stone of the Roman Catholic 
Church, built on ground donated bj' the 
Commission, was laid at Culebra, .August 30, 
by the Bishop of Panama, assisted by Com- 
mission chaplain. Rev. Father Collins. Short 
addreses were made bj- the Bishop and by 
Father Collins, and music was furnished by 
the I. C. C. band. 



Atlantic Division Storehouses. 

Two storehouses, 50 feet bj- 200 have been 
authorized for the .Atlantic Division. One 
will be built at the dr\- dock in Cristobal and 
will be used for the storage of dredge parts 
and material for the ships and floating equip- 
ment on the Atlantic side. The other store- 
house will be built along.side the docks at 
Gatun, where cement, stone, sand, and 
other material will be delivered for the Ga- 
tun Locks. Both these storehouses will be 
convenient to water and rail transportation. 

On Saturda)' evening, September 5, the 
Pacific Masonic Club will give a smoker in 
the hall above the office of the Quarter- 
master's Department, Ancon. All American 
Masons of Corozal, La Boca, and Ancon are 
requested to be present. 



Activities of the Young Men's Christian 
Association. 

The l,otus Glee Club will give the foUowius: return 
recitals : September 5. Cristobal ; September 7. Cu- 
lehr;i ; Sei)tc-niber 8, GorKoua. 

CRI.STOBAI, . 

Basketball enthusiasm is again ;it a high pitch, 
and a local toximament is being organized prepara- 
tory to the development of a first team. 

Mr. Geo. H- Wolbrecht gave another e.vhibitioil of 
chess playing on Monday night. He played twenty- 
four games during the evening, winning all except- 
ing two. one a draw with Mr. E. M. Fechtig. and 
one in wliich he was be.iten. ' 

Mr. I.. B. Cundiff. a physical director of several 
years' experience, has been secured Id take up the 
work as assistant secretary in charge of the physi- 
cal work at the Cristobal Y. M. C. A. Mr. Cundiff is 
expected to take up his work in a few days. 

The orchestra from the steamship Prim August 
//'/M(Vw/ gave a concert at the clnbhou.se last Mou- 
d.'iy night. 

.\bout six hundred circulars, containing a state- 
ment of the privileges offered by the Cristobal Y. M. 
C. A., were sent out this week to emploj-es of the 
Commission who were not members. .As a direct 
result, a considerable number of men have joined 
since receiving the circular. 

EMPIRE. 

A class was organized August 2,5 to study mechani- 
cal drawing and mathematics. It started with a 
membership of twenty, with Mr. Hampton, of the 
Mechanical Division, as leader. All men of Empire, 
interested in this study, are invited to join the class. 
One result of the new class is an addition of eleven 
members to the Y. M. C. A. 

Open house was kept Monday evening, August 31, 
when a program by local musicians, assisted by the 
Norcross orchestra, was given. 

Thursday evening. September 3, the Lotus Glee 
Club of New York will entertain, and Friday a dual 
meet will be held between the boys of Corozal and 
Empire. 

It is expected the duckpiii tournament will close 
September 7. Ten men out of the 31 entered have 
played their share of games, and 710 games have 
been rolled. The high record has been broken again 
by L. A, Durand, with 118. 

The tenpin high score last week was rolled by 
Perry Brown, who ni.ade nine strikes and two spares, 
his score being 253. 



I. O. R. M. Convention. 

The eight tribes of Improved Order of Red Men 
will hold a convention in Colon on September 6, for 
the purpose of forming a Great Council of the Order 
on the Isthmus. A special train will leave Panama 
about 7 o'clock a. m., and will make stops of about 
one hour's duration at each of the stations along the 
line in which a tribe resides. All Red Men. their 
families, and all interested pale-faces are cordially 
invited to attend. 



Misdirected Letters. 

Division of Dead Letters. 
Ancon. C. Z.. .September 2, 1908. 
The following insufficiently addressed letters, origi- 
nating in the United States and its possessions, have 
been received in the office of the Director of Posts, 
and may be secured on request of addressee : 
Admins, J. S. Mannoni, L- 

Barrett, Nelson M. Merriett, Walter J. 

Bell, Miss Alvirin Morse, I. V. 

Bruck, Harry W. Mullane, D. 

Carson, Arthur (3) Nalligan, Thomas 

Clips, Sophia Noland, C. P. 

Dallow, Arthur Pearson, Mr. and Mrs. 

Fletcher. William Herbert 

Gibson, Loretta pflueger, E. B. 

Golson, Miss C. Phillip. Miss C. 

Harrison, Miss Vera Power, W. h- 

Hopkins (6) Saudenson, Frank E. 

Lee, Mrs. Ernest E- Simpson. Henry 

Lund, I.ars J. Westberg. J. K. 

Macfarlane, Mrs. T. W. 

The AVora . which arrived August 27, brought the 
following cargo for canal work : .Seven hundred and 
fifty-one boiler tubes. 30 split switches, 20,000 cases 
•15 per cent dynamite, 905 steel bars and angles, 3,000 
pairs angle plates. 2,631 rails, and 1.331 pieces cast- 
ings. ' , 

The following were the arrivals and departures at 
the port of Ancon in the week ending August 2S : 

Arrivals— August 23, Chile, from Valparaiso. 

Departures— August 25, Mapocho. to Valparaiso; 
U. S. S. .\filuaukec. to Amapala : Augiist 28, Quito, 
to Buenaventura. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS. 

Labor Day a Holiday. 

Circular No. I'^s : 

I^ibor Day. Mon(la>-. September 7. 190S. will be ob- 
served as a holitlay throuj^liont the Canal Zone, and, 
as far as possible, all work will be suspended on that 
day. 

Geo. W. Goethals. 

Chair?nan . 
Culebra, C. Z.. August 27. 1908. 



Transfer of Duties— Disbursing Officer and 

Examiner of Accounts. 

Circular No. 1S3h : 

Effective October 1. 1908 : With the approval of the 
Seeretary of War, the following duties assigned by 
Executive Order dated August 15.1907, to the Dis- 
bursing Officer on the Isthmus and the Examiner of 
Account.s. are hereby transferred as indicated below : 

1. To tlie Chief Quartermaster is assigned the 
duty of keeping property accounts with the various 
officers upon the Isthmus charged with the custody 
and use of propert.w The Disbursing Officer is re- 
lieved of that duty, and tlie Kxaininer of Accounts 
is relieved of the duty of annually verifying prop- 
erty accounts by an inventory of all jjroperty. 

2. The Chief Quartermaster is charged with the 
duty of receiving and examining returns of prop- 
erty in the custody of all officers on the Isthmus, 
and shall perform all duties concerning property 
accounts recjuired by the Act of Congress of March 
29. 1S94, under such rules and regulations as may be 
approved by the Secretary of War, and perform such 
other duties relative to the property of the Commis- 
sion as may be ordered by the Chairman. 

3. The Disbursing Officer on the Isthmus shall be 
charged with the disbursement of the funds of the 
Commission upon pay-rolls and approved vouchers 
after examination by the Examiner of Accounts, 
and shall have access at all times to the books, papers 
and records of the Examiners office. The accomils of 
the Disbursing Officer shall be sent to the Examiner 
of Accounts as soon after the close of each month as 
practicable, and after the administrative examina- 
tion thereof by the Examiner, the latter officer shall 
forward them to the Auditor for the War Depart- 
ment. 

4. The Disbursing Officer on the Isthmus shall col- 
lect accounts and claims due the Commission, upon 
their transmission to him by the l^xaminer, and 
such accounts and claims shall be sent by the several 
departments in which the\- originate to tlie Exam- 
iner. The Disbursing Officer shall receive, safely 
keep, pay over, and account for as required lt\ law 
and regulations, all fuiuls that may be collected by 
him or paid to him. 

5. The Disbursing Officer on the Isthmus shall 
receive all issues of coupon books and meal tickets, 
subject to verification of nmnbers and values at the 
time of receii)t by the Examiner, who shall charge 
the DisbursiJig Officer with the same. The Disburs- 
ing Officer shall forward such books and tickets to 
timekeepers and others, upon requisitions therefor 
approved by the Examiner, and under rules pre- 
scribed by the Chaii-mau. The Disbursing Officer 
and timekeepers and otliers receiving such books 
and tickets shall account therefor monthly to the 
Examiner. 

Other duties heretofore performed bj' the Dis 
bursing Officer on the Isthmus, excepting the keep- 
ing of property accounts, are hereby transferred to 
the Examiner of Accounts. 

Geo. W. Goethals. 

Chairman. 
Culebra. C. Z.. August 27, 1908. 



Transfer. 



To All Concf.kned : The following transfer is 
announced : 

C. P. Allen, from Disti'ict Quartermaster. I^a Boca. 
to District Quartermaster. Culebra. 

W. H. South is appointed District Quartermaster. 
L,a Boca. 

Effective September S. 

C. A. Devol. 
Chic/ Quartevmaslfy. 

Culebra, August 24. 190S. 



and faithful sen-ice and hearty cooperation with 
which they have performed their duties in handling 
the large amount of business for nearly three years, 
during which time I have been Chief of the Divi- 
sion, and retjuest that they render to my successor. 
Maj. Devol. Chief Quartermaster, the .'^ame loyal an 
efficient sen'ice that they have rendered to me- 
W. G. Triun. 
Chief. Division ((/ ytalerial and Supph j. 
Cristobal. August 31. 1908. 



Acting Superintendent. 

To .\LL Concerned: 

During the absence of the Superintendent of Mo- 
tive Power and Machinery, Mr. Earle J. Banta. in 
addition to his otherduties as Mechanical Engineer, 
will assume general oversight over affairs in the 
Mechanical Division, and is given authority to .sign 
pay-rolls, vouchers, etc. 

Geo. D. Brooke, 
Superiiift'iitirnt of Mo/ivc Pou-f-r and Marhinerj . 
Approved : 

Geo. W. Goethals. 

Chair/nan and Chief Ensi"'''' 



t 2 



Proposals for Cross and Switch Ties. 

Sealed proposjils will be received at the office of 
W, G. Tubby. Purchasing Agent on the Isthmus, Cris- 
tobal. C. Z.,uj) to3.30p. m., Wednesday. September?. 
1908, at which time they will be opened in public, for 
the sale to the Isthmian Canal Commission of forty 
thousand (40,000) first-class cross ties, four thousand 
(4.000) second-class cross ties, ten (10) sets of No. 7 
switch ties, and ten (10) sets of No. 10 switch ties, 
according to the following specifications: 
1. The timber used shall be black or yellow Guai- 
acum, commonlv called Guayacan or I,ignuiu 
Vitee. 

All ties shall be well and smoothly hewed out of 
straight-growing timber of specified dimensions 
and out of wind, sawed or square-cut ends, with 
straight and parallel faces. All ties shall have 
bark entirely removed when cut. Ties s!iall be 
free from splits, shakes, loose or decayed knots, 
or any other imperfections which may impair 
their strength or durability. 

Except in pole ties with rounded sides, or In half- 
round ties, the width of face and thickness shall 
conform to sizes given in the table of dimensions 
below, but a variation of size will be jjermitted of 
one inch over in thickness, one inch overin width, 
and three inches over in length. 

In pole ties with rounded sides, and in half-round 
ties, the width of face may be less than that given 
in the table of dimensions, but the least area 
of cross section shall not be less than the area 
correspondin,g to the tabular dimen.sion, and in 
no case shall the width of face be less than 
six inches for fir.it-class and five and one-half 
inches for second-class ties. 

TABLE OF DIMENSIONS. 













Maxiinmn 


variat'li 




' Thickness by 


5 


from 


straichtedfi:*^ 




width of face 


!• 


Top and 
' bottom 


I Hides 


1st class.. ^ 


6' 


' x8" ! 


8'0 


' ; 


%' 


,1 2„ 


2d 


class.... 


■ 5yo"x7" 1 


7'y 


' i 


1" , 3" 






SWITCH 


TIES. 


Tunti. 






Xo. 7 Titryioiii. 


u 


No. 20 


).v/. 









?, 







si 


1^ 


c 




1 


% 

a 


C 


g 
M 
V 




2 


s 


•i 


'•^ 


•a 

4 


« 




tt, 


+ 


SVaxSVa 


9'0" 


165.76 ; 


6ysx8H 


9'0" 


165.76 


7 


do 


9'6" 


306.18 ] 


i 


do 


9'6" 


218.70 


4 


do 


ifi'n" 


1SI.16 


7 


do 


lO'O" 


322.2H 






10'6" 


241.70 


5 


do 


10'6" 


241.7(J 


^ 


do 


ll'O" 


151.92 


5 


do 


ll'O" 


253.20 


:^ 


do 


n'fi" 


158.82 


4 


do 


ii'e'' 


211.76 


4 


do 


12'0" 


221.00 


4 


do 


12'0" 


221.111) 


Z 


do 


1^6" 


115.10 


3 


do 


12'6'' 


172.(,2 


4 


do 


13 '0" 


239.40 


3 


do 


13'0" 


179,5J 


1 


7x9 


1.^6" 


212.63 


3 


7x9 


13'6" 


212.6.^ 


1 




u'n" 


73.50 


3 


do 


14'0" 


220.50 




do 


14'6" 


152.25 


3 


do 


14'6" 


228.38 


> 


do 


is'n" 


157.50 


5 


do 


,15'0" 


393.75 


J 


SVi^Wi 


15'6" 


214.08 


2 
56 


6V2XSy2 


|15." 


142.72 


47 




t2.594.OO 


3.1S4..52 



Abolition of Division of Material and Sup- 
plies. 

Circular No. 246; 

To All Empioyes of the Dwision or Materia/ and 
Supplies: In accordance with Circnlar 185c. of An- 
gust 14, 1908, iss'ied by the Chairman and Chief En- 
gineer, Isthmian Canal Commission, effective Sep- 
tember 1, 190S. the Division of Material and Supplies 
will be abolished, and the duties pertainini^r thereto 
performed by the Quartermaster's Department of 
the Isthmian Canal Commission. 

With the abolishing of the Division of Material 
and Supplies, and transferring tlie duties pertaining 
thereto to the Quartermaster's Department, I desire 
to thank the employes of this Division for the loyal 



Delivery will be made on the docks at Cristobal or 
La Boca, C. Z,, or within fifty feet of any track of 
of the Paiiama railroad, not more than four feet 
above or four feet below grade, and ties will be in- 
spected as they are unloaded on the dock or when 
loaded on cars. Delivery shall not begin later than 
October 1, 1908, and shall be completed l)y January 
1, 1909, Bidders shall furnish a sample not less than 
five inches square and twelve inches long of the 
kind of wood they propose to furnish, and submit 
certified check, money order or cash in the amount 
of one hundred (100) dollars, U. S. currency, as evi- 
dence of responsibility and ability to carry out tlie 
pro\nsions of the contract, and nine hundred (900) 
dollars, U. S. currency, additional at the time of 
execution of the contract. Bids shall be enclosed in 
sealed envelopes plainly marked "Proposals for Fui^ 
nishing Guaiacum Ties." The Commission resen-es 
the right to reject any and all bids. 



COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT. 

CIJMMISSAKV PRICES 

I'or week beginning September 1 : 
I'RKSH MF.ATS, PQUI.TKY AND CCII.II JIKATS. 

/•lice. 

lUcf — Siil)in roast per lb 30 

Kump roast per lb 30 

Porterhouse per lb 30 

Kib-roast, short cut (not under 3V2 

I)ounds) per lb 24 

Kib-roast, second cut (not under 3 lbs),... 20 

Chuck-roast per lb 15 

Soup per lb 9 

Stew ..per lb 12 

Conied per lb 12. II. 16 

.Suet peril) 4 

Steaks — Sirloin per lb 30 

Porterhouse per lb 30 

Rump per 1 h .^0 

Tenderloii; .per lb 30 

Kound per lb 24 

Veal— CutU ts per lb 24 

Short-cut chops per lb 24 

I ,oi u per lb 2-> 

T'.r.lire fore(iuarters (15 to 20 lbs). .per lb 1! 

1 I r stewing per lb 1 1 

Mutlnu—ICntire forequarters. (not under 

10 lbs) peril) •) 

Short-cut chops per lb 20 

I,eg (8 to 10 lbs) peril) IS 

I^inib— h'or stewing per lb 10 

Entire forecjuarters per lb Id 

Chops peril) .W 

I,eg (6 to 8 lbs) per lb 2." 

Pork— Cuts per lb 20 

Livers— Beef per lb 11 

Calf each N) 

Sansage— Pork per lb 16 

Bologna per lb 15 

Lieberwurst per lb 15 

Sweet bread— Veal each 1 .20 

Beef per lb 25 

pigs' tongues (salted) per lb 15 

Ox tongues each 90 

Chicken, dres-sed (milk-fed) each 1.40 

Chickens, large each 1.90 

Powls, medium and large each, SI. 00 and 1.25 

Ducks, fatted (fancy) each 1.10 

Suckling pigs e.ach 4.90 

Turkeys per lb 30 

Squabs each 45 

i:ggs (fresh) per dozen 32 

C ipons each 2.40 

1,1 oilers each 70 

llacon— Strips per I'l 23 

English, breakfast, sliced per lb §26 

Ham — Sugar-cured, sliced per lb §25 

One-half, for boiling per lb §20 

Westphalia per lb 45 

Ferris per lb 19 

Beef, salt, family per !b 16 

Salt Pork per lb 13 

D.\IRY PRODUCTS. 

Butter, prints, prime quality per lb 33 

Cheese— Cream, Phila each 22 

Neufchatel each 6 

Swiss per lb 33 

Gouda per lb 34 

Edam each 1.05 

Cainembert per lb 28 

McLaren's per jar 15 

Pinxter's per tin 22 

IJuttermilk bottle 15 

FRUITS AND VE^GETABLES. 

Lemons dozen IS 

Oranges dozen IS 

Lettuce per lb 20 

White potatoes per lb 3i,i- 

Cabbage per lb 4 

Onions Per lb 31,2 

Com dozen 25 

Melons «'ch 35 

Cucumbers per lb 10 

Sweet potatoes per lb 2V2 

Beets per 11) 6 

Carrots per lb 6 

Squash (summer) per lb 7 

Leeks bunch 10 

Okra per lb 10 

.\lligator pears ......each 5 

§ Sold only from cold-storage and not from Com- 
missaries. 

NEW ARTICLED. 

Pi-ice. 

Cigarettes, Nestor, superfine. 10s package 20 

Cigarettes, Nestor, royal, 10s package IS 

Violet .iinmonia bottle 20 

Viscol shoe dressing tin 12 

Caps, baUiing s"':'' ^ 

Madras nets for curtaining yard ,30 and 56 



THE CANAL RECORD 



CANAL DIRECTORY. 

ISTHMIAN CANAL COMMISSION. 

Lieut. -Col. Geo. AV. Goethals, U. S. A., 

Culehra. 
Lieut. -Col. H. F. Hodges, U. S. A., ("ce 
Jackson Smith, effective September 16. 1908). 
Culebra. 
Maj. D. D. Gaillard, U. S. A., Empire. 
Maj. Wm. L. Sibert, U. S. A., Gatun. 
Civil Engineer H. H. Rousseau, U. S. N., 

Culebra, 
Mr. Jo C. S. Blackburn, Ancon. 
Col. W. C. Gorgas, U. S. A., A- con. 
Mr. Jackson Smith, (resigned, effective Septem- 
lembcr 15, 190.S). 

Mr. Joseph Bucklin Bishop, 

Secretary, Ancon. 



DKPARTMENTS. 

Construction and Engineering. 

Headquarters. Culebm. 
Lieut. -Col. Geo. W. Goethals, Chairman 
and Chief Engineer. 
M. B. DePutron, .\ssistant to the Chairman. 
W. H. aiav. Secretary to the Chairman. 
C. A. Mcllvaine. Chief Clerk. 
A. K. Nichols. C)ffice Engineer. 
Caleb M. Saville. Assistant Engineer, 

Lieut. -Col. H. F. Hodges, Assistant Chief 
Engineer. 

C. O. Carlson. .Secretary. 
Edward Schildhaner. Electrical and Mechanical 

Engineer. 
U' I>. Coniish.II. F, Tucker, Henry Goldniark 
and Da\'id Molilor. Designing Engineers, 

Civil Engineer H. H. Rousseau. 
J. C- Par-sons. .Secretar>'. 

Central Division. 

Headfiuarters. limpire. 
Maj. D. D. Gaillard, Division Engineer. 
A. E. Bronk, Chief Clerk, 
Louis K, Rourke, Assistant Division Engineer. 
A. S. Zinn. Resident Engineer. 
Mark \V. Tennj-. .Assistant Engineer. 
R. W. Hebard, Assistant t^ngineer. 
W. L. Thompson, .\ssistant Engineer 
Geo. H. Ruggles. Assistant Engineer. 

Atlantic Oivision. 

Headquarters. Oatun. 
Maj. Wm. L. Sibert, Division Engineer. 

R. M. Sands. Chief Clerk, 

Maj. Chester Harding, r, s. A.. Assistant Divi- 
sion Engineer, 

Maj, Edgar Jad win, t'. .S. A.. Resident E'ngineer. 

Maj, J, P, Jervey, l", S, A.. Assistant Engineer. 

Capt. G. M. Hoffman. U. S, A,, .\ssistant En- 
gineer. 

Capt. Horton \V. Stickle. V. S. A., Assi,stant En- 
gineer. 

R. B. Smith. Assistant Engineer. 

L. G. Thoni. Assistant I-jigineer. 

K. C. .Stanton. Assist.'iiit Engineer. 

Pacific Division. 

Headquarters, CorozjU, 
S. B. Williamson, Acting Division Engineer. 

E. A. I,eMay. Chief Clerk. 

W. G. Comber. Resitlent Engineer. 
G. B. Strickler. Resident Engineer. 
Wm. F. M. Acheson. Assistant Engineer. 

Mechanical Division. 

Headquarters. Culebra. 
Geo. D. Brooke. Superintendent of Motive 
Power and Machinerv. 

F. \V. Duty. Chief 'clerk. 

Earl J. Banta. Mechanical Engineer. 
A. I.,. Robinson, Electrical Engineer. 

Division of Meteorology&River Hydraulics 

Headquarters. .Ancon. 
R. M. Arango, Division Engineer. 
I). \V. MacCorm.ack, Chief Clerk. 

Qnartermaster's Department. 

Headquarters. Culebra. 
Maj. C. A. Devol. U. S. A., Chief Quarter- 
master. 

C. H. Mann. Chief Clerk. 
Lieut. R. E. Wood, U.S.A.. Assistant Chi.f 
Quartermaster. 



Civil Administration. 

Headquarters. Ancon. 

Jo C. S. Blackburn, Head of the Department. 

H. D. Reed. Executive Secretary. Ancon. 

G. A. Ninas. Chief Clerk, .\ncon. 
Tom I\I. Cooke. Chief, Division of Posts, Cus- 
toms and Revenues, Ancon, 
Herman A, Gudger, Deputy Collector, Ancon. 
E. Lewis Baker. Deputy Collector. Cristobal. 
George M. Shontz, Prosecuting Attorney , ,\ncon, 
George R. Sh.anton. Chief of Police. Ancon. 

D. E. .McDonald. Chief Clerk. 
C. E. Weidman. Chief. Fire Department. Cris- 
tobal. 
Geo. I,. Campen, Superintendent of Public 
Works. Ancon. 

C. R. .Sargent. Chief Clerk. 
J. J. Reidy. Assistant .Superintendent of Public 

Works. Cristobal. 
David C. O'Connor. Superintendent of Schools. 
.\ncon. 

Canal Zone Judiciary. 

Headquarters, .^ncon. 
Supreme Court— Dr. F. Mutis Durdn, Chief 
Justice. 

\\'alter Emerj-, Clerk, Ancon. 
H. A. Gudger. Associate Justice, Empire. 
Lorin C. Collins. Associate Jtistice". Cristobal. 
Circuit Court. First Circuit— Dr. F. Mutis 
Duriin. Judge. Ancon. 
Walter Emery, Circuit Court Clerk, Ancon, 
Circuit Court, Second Circuit— H. A. Gudger. 
Judge, lunpire, 

Elbert JI, Goolsby, Circuit Court Clerk, 
limpire. 
Circuit Court. Third Circuit— l,orin C. Collins. 
Judge. Cristobal. ^ 
Nelson R. Johnson. Circuit Court Clerk. 
Cristobal. 
JI, C. Rerdell. .Senior District Judge, Cristobal. 
S, E. Blackburn. District Judge. Ancon. 
Edgar S. (Harrison. District Judge. Empire.. 
J. B. March. District Judge. Gorgona. 
Thomas E. Brown. Jr.. District Judge. Cristo- 
bal. 

Department of Law. 

Headquarters. Washington. D. C. 
Richard Reid Rogers, General Counsel, 
Washington, D. C. 

George M. .Shontz. .attorney for Lsthmian Canal 

Commission and Panama Railroad Compan>-. 

Ancon. 
George H. Bartholomew. .Assistant Attorney 

for Isthmian Canal Commission and Panama 

Railroad Company, Ar.con. 
Inocencio Galindo, Legal Adviser to the Isth- 

"mian Canal Commission. Ancon. 



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS. 



Subsistence Department. 

Headqiiarters. Culebra. ■ 
Maj. Eugene T. Wilson, U. S. A., Subsistence 
Officer. 

W. F. Shipley. Chief Clerk. 

Maj. Wendell L. Simpson. U. S. A.. Purchis 
iiig Aeelit. 24 State Street. N. Y. Cil.» 



Department of Sanitation. 

lleadfjuarters. Ancon. 
Col.W. C. Gorgas, Chief Sanitary Officer. 
M.aj.C. C. McCnlloch, Jr., U. S. A., Executive officer. 
Harry E. Bovay, Chief Clerk, 

H. R. Carter, Director of Hospitals. Ancon. 

Surgeon. J, C. Perry. P, H. and M. H. S., Chief 
Quarantine Officer, Ancon. 

M.aj. John I,. Phillips. V. S. A.. Superintendent 
Ancon Hospital. .-Vncon. 

Capt. Alexander Murray. I'. S. A., Assistant to 
Superintendent. 

J. E. Leys. U. .S. N. . Superintendent. Colon 
Hospital. Colon. 

Capt. Robt. v.. Noble. V. S. A.. General In- 
spector, .\ncon. 

Surgeon Claude C. Pierce. P. H. and M. H. S. 
Quarantine Officer, Colon, 

Dr, Fleetwood Giuver, P. H.and M. H. S.. Quar- 
antine Officer. 1 anrma. 

Dr. John H. Purnell. Health Oflicer. P.anania. 

Dr. M. li. Connor, Health Officer, Colon, 

Joseph A. I.ePrince, Chief Sanitar>- Inspector, 
.\ncon. 

Disbui-sements. 

Ileadcjuarters, Ennjire, 
Edward J. Williams, Disbursing Officer. 
Wm. .M. Wood. .Assistant Disbursing Officer. 

Kxamination of Accounts. 

Headtiuarters. Empire. 
\V. W. W^irwick, Examiner of .Accounts. 
W. D. JIabry. Chief Clerk. 

Panama Railroad Company. 

Headquarters, Colon, 
H. J. Slifer, Assistant to the President, and 
(jeneral Manager, Colon. 

W. G. Tucker. Secretary, Colon. 

Purchasing Department. 

Htadquarters. W.-ishington. D. C. 
Capt. F. C. Boggs. V. S. A., General Pur- 
chasing Officer. 

CE. Dole. Chief Clerk. 

F. C. Nordsick. Assistant Purchasing Agent. J.l 

State street. New York City, 
S, E. Redfern. Assistant Purchasing Agenl, 

Custom House. New Orleans. r,a. 



'i'he following is a list of the sailings of the Pan- 
an\a Railroad Steamship Company, of the Royal 
Mail Steam Packet Company, of the Hamburg- 
.\merican Line, and of the United Fniit Company's 
Line, the Panama Railroad Company's dates being 
subject to change : 

FRO.M SV.W YORK TO COLON. 

.\lli,inca p. R. R.Thursday Aug. 27 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Saturday Aug. 29 

Finance P. R. R.Tuesday Sept. 1 

Esperanza P. R. R., Saturday Sept. 5 

Magdalena R.-M Saturday Sept. 5 

Colon P. R. R.Thnr.sday -Sept. 10 

Pr. Aug. Wilhelm .......H.-A .Saturday Sept. 12 

Advance p. R. R. Tuesday Sept. 15 

Orinoco R.-M Saturday Sept. 19 

.\llianca P. R. R.Monday Sept. 21 

Finance P. R. R.Saturday Sept. 26 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Saturday Sept. 26 

Panama P. R. R.Thursday. . ..Oct. 1 

Atrato R.-M Saturday Oct. 3 

Colon P. R. R.Tuesday Oct. 6 

All the steamers of the Hamburg-American and 
Royal Mail lines call at Kingston enroute to Colon. 

KKOM COLON TO NEW YORK. 

Advance P. R. R.Friday .Sept. 4 

Orinoco R.-M... .Tuesday .Sept. 8 

Allianca P. R. R.Wednesday.. ...Sept. 9 

Finance P. R. R.JIonday ^Sept. 14 

Prinz Joachim H..A Tuesday Sept. 15 

Esperanza ;...P. R. R.Friday Sept. 18 

Atrato R.-M. ...Tuesday .Sept. 22 

Colon P. R. R. Wednesday .Sept. 23 

.\dv.ance P. R. R.Monday .Sept. 28 

Pr. Aug. Wilhelm H.-.'i. Tuesday Sept. 29 

Alli.anca P. R. R.Saturday Oct. 3 

Clyde R.-M. ...Tuesday Oct. 6 

Finance P. R. R. Thursday Oct. 8 

Panama P. R. R. Tuesday Oct. 13 

Prinz Joachim .H.-A Tuesday Oct. 13 

Colon P. R. R.Monday Oct. 19 

Tagus R.-M Tuesday Oct. 20 

P'RORt NEW ORLEANS TO COLON. 

Parismina U.F.C.. Saturday Aug. 29 

Ellis U.H.C.. Saturday Sept. 5 

Cartago tJ.F.C... Saturday Sept. 12 

Harry T. Inge U.F.C.. Saturday Sept. 19 

Ellis U.F.C.. Saturday Sept. 26 

ERO."M COLON TO NKW ORLEANS. 

Parismina U.F.C.. Tuesday .Sept. 8 

Ellis U.F.C..Tue.sday .Sept. 15 

Cartago U.F.C.. Tuesday .Sept. 22 

Harry T. Inge U.F.C.. Tuesday Sept. 29 

FROM COLON TO BARBADOS. CALLING AT TRINIDAD. 

Magdalena R.-M... Tuesday Sept. IS 

Orinoco R.-M. ..Tuesday -Sept. 29 

The Panama railroad steamships sail at 3 p. m. 
from dock at Cristobal direct to New York. 

The Prinz steamers of the Hamburg-American line 
sail from Colon at 1 i). m. via Kingston. Jamaica, 
for New York. 

All Royal Mail steamers mentioned above leave early 
in the morning from Colon vi.a Kingston. Jamaica, 
for New York. All m.-iil and passengers sliould be 
on board early on d.ay of s.ailing. 

T'he steamers of the United Fniit Company's line 
sail from New Orleans at U a. m.. and from Colon 
at 1.30 p. m,, via Port Limon. for New Orleans. In 
addition to the above, the United Fruit Company 
dispatches a steamer about every ten days from 
Colon, ^-ia Bocas del Toro, for New Orleans. 

Sailings of the French line (Cie. Gi^n^rale Trans- 
atlantique) for Venezuelan ports, Martinique and 
Guadeloupe on the 3d and 20th of each month. 



Tug Service Porto Bt-Ilo and Nombre de' 
Digs. 

K:Pfective, .Vugnst 6, 190.S: The following is the 
schedule for t\ig serv-ice between Cristobal, Porto 
Bello and Noml)re de Dios: 

Sunday: Leave Cristobal 6,3f,15. m. for Porto Bello 
only; returning same day. 

Monday: Leave Cristobal after Train 2 for Porto 
Bello and Nombre de Dios: returning same day. 

Tuesday: I^eave Cristobal after Train 2 without 
tow, for Porto Bello only: returning, leave Porto 
Bello 2.15 p. m., without tow, 

Wednesday: Le.'ive Cristobal after Train 2 for 
Porto Bello .and Nombre de Dios; returning same 
day. 

Friday: Leave Cristobal after Train 2 for Porto 
Bello and Ntmibre dc Dios: returniu.g same day. 

Saturday: Leave Cristobal after Train 2 for Porto 
Bello only: rettirning, len\"e Porto Bello 5.30 p. ra. 



CANAL 




RECORD 



Volume II. 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1908. 



No. 2. 



The Canal Record 

Published weekly under theauthorlty and supervision of the 
ISTHMiAN cAHAl LOWM iSSION 

"Tlie Canal Recofd" is issued J ree of charsc. one 
copy each, to all employes of the Commission and Pan- 
ama Railroad Company xvhose names are on the " so/d'' 
roll. Extra copies can be obtained from the tie^cs 
stands »/ the Panama Railroad Company for Jive cents 
each 

Address all Communications 

THE CANAL RECORD 

Ancoo, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama* 

iVo communication, either jor publication or request- 
ing injormatiou, ivill receive attejition unless signed 
with the full name and address of the writer. 



NOTES OF PROGRESS. 

President Roosevelt on Canal "Work. 

■ The letter of President Roosevelt, dated 
Oyster Bay, August 21, 190S, acknowledging 
the receipt of a report of the Special Com- 
mission which visited the Isthmus on May 
last, as publishecf in The Caxal Record of 
August 26, was incomplete. Two paragraphs 
were omitted from the text of the letter as it 
appeared in the cable dispatches to the Pan- 
ama Stay & Hci-ahl. from whicli The Canai, 
Record quoted it. 
These paragraphs are appended: 
Meanwhile the treatment of hycienic conditions on 
the Isthmus has been such as to make it literally the 
model for all work of the kind in tropical countries. 
Five years ayo the Isthmus of Panama was a byword 
of unhealthiness of the .nost deadly kind. At pres- 
ent the Canal Zone is one of the healthiest places on 
the globe and the work which is being prosecuted 
■with such tremendous energy is being prosecuted 
under cnnditious so favorable to the health and well 
being of the workers that the mortality among them 
is abnormally small. 

Finally, in addition to the extreme efficiency of the 
work under Colonel Goethals and hisasso..iates. and 
the extraordinary hygienic success achieved tnider 
Dr. Gorgas. there is the further and exceedingly grat- 
ifying fact that on the Isthmus the United States 
Government has been able to show itself a model em- 
ployer. There are matters to correct, of course, as 
your report shows, but on the whole it is true that 
the United SLites Government is looking after the 
welfare, health and comfort of those working for it 
as no other government has ever done in work of like 
character. 

Conditions at Miraflores Locks* Site. 

Work on the site of the Miraflores Locks 
and Dams has reached the point where the 
nature of the construction at this place when 
finished can be judged from the appearance 
of the excavation. Steam shovels and spoil 
trains are making rapid progress in taking 
out the earth that overlies the rock, and 
some rock is being excavated in and just be- 
low the forebay. On either side of the prism 
d3-kes are being built for the handling plant, 
and also to serve as a barrier behind which 
dredged material may be pumped. Excava- 
tion for the core for the Cocoli Dam is pro- 
gressing satisfactorily. 

The 20-inch suction dredge Sandpiper, 



which began its trial at La Boca on August 
25, was taken from that place the next day, 
and is now completing its trial in the Canal 
prism opposite Corozal. In about a month 
it will be taken up the Rio Grande, at high 
water, to the site of the locks at Miraflores. 
A dyke has been built across the southern 
end of the locks' site, where it is proposed to 
regulate the stage of the water within the 
basin where the dredge will work, thus keep- 
ing it as high as may be necessary. 

The plan contemplates dredging about one 
million cubic yards from the locks' site, after 
which the basin will be unwatered and steam 
shovels set at work taking out the rock to 
the level required in each flight. About 
500,000 cubic yards will be excavated from 
the north end of the locks' site by steam 
shovels during the time the dredging is in 
progress, after which appro^mately 1,250,- 
000 cubic yards will remain to be excavated 
by steam shovels. 

Between the locks' site and La Boca, 
clearing the prism is well advanced, and the 
steam shovel at work at Cardenas Hill is 
supplying material for the construction of 
the dyke between that point and the west 
dump of the abandoned Sosa-Corozal dam. 



Power Plant at Gatnn. 

.\ site has been determined upon for the 
power house at Gatun, north of the unload- 
ing docks and near the east diversion. The 
steam shovel now at work on the site of the 
docks will be moved this week to tlie power 
house site, and excavation for the founda- 
tions will begin at once. The power house 
will have a concrete foundation and base- 
ment, and the superstructure will be corru- 
gated iron over a wood frame. It will be 
150 feet long and S-t feet wide. 

In the boiler room will be six 400-horse- 
power water-tube boilers of the Keeler 
type, equipped with induced draught fans 
in duplicate. Oil will be used as fuel. The 
engine room will contain three General Elec- 
tric, Curtis, 1500-k. w., three-phase 25-cycle, 
base-condenser turbines, and a suVistation 
equipment of two 500-k. w. and one 300-k. w. 
rotary converters with the necessary aux- 
iliary apparatus. A 20-ton 3-motor crane will 
run the length of the engine room. 

This power plant will furnish tlie current 
for unloading at the docks, for themotorson 
the lock cableways, and for the cable road. 
It should not be confused with the hydraulic 
power plant that will furnish the power to 
operate Gatun Locks, although it will prob- 
ablv be maintained as an emergency plant 
after the Canal is completed. 



Quartermaster's Depot at Mount Hope. 

It is estimated that the value of the stores 
turned over to the Quartermaster's Depart- 
ment by the old Division of Material and 
Supplies on September 1, is over $3,000,000. 
A change in the method of handling supplies 



is to be made by the Quartermaster's De- 
partment, to the extent that the Jlount 
Hope storehouse will be made a Quarter- 
master's Depot. The machinery in the 
Lirio planing mill will be moved to Mount 
Hope, and the printing plant of the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission, located in Panama, 
and that of the Panama Railroad Company, 
located at Cristobal, will be merged into one 
plant located at Mount Hope. .^11 station- 
ery supplies for the Commission and the 
railroad will be issued from the Mount Hope 
depot. 

Captain Courtland Xixon, U. S. A., will 
be Depot Quartermaster at Mount Hope. 
He was born in Texas, July 10, 1S74; was 
graduated from Princeton College in 1895, 
and commissioned a second lieutenant in the 
First Infantry in 1898. In 1S99 he was pro- 
moted to first lieutenant, and in 190-t was 
made captain. He served two years in the 
Quartermaster's Department at San Fran- 
cisco under Major Devol, and for the past 
two years has been stationed at the Phila- 
delphia Depot. 



More Locomotives and Cars. 

-A contract to furnish ten 40-ton 6-wheel 
connected, saddle-tank locomotives for the 
work at Porto Bello has been awarded to 
H. J. Porter & Co., of Pittsburg, the lowest 
bidder. These engines are to be 3-foot, 6-inch 
gauge, with wheels 40 inches in diameter, 
cvlinders 15 inches by 20 inches, tractive 
force 15,000 pounds, aiid boilers carrying 160 
pounds pressure. The_\' will operate from 
the quarry at Porto I?ello to the crushers on 
a 2V2 to 3 per cent grade, will run on a 20- 
degree construction track, and will haul 
about 600 yards of stone, weighing 2,900 
pounds to a yard. They will be constructed 
along the latest designs for this class of en- 
gine, including an air brake rigging which 
will meet the interstate commerce regula- 
tions. Locomotives of this type are in gen- 
eral service in the States in similar classes 
of work. 

.\ contract has also been let for fifty 6- 
yard, all metal dump cars, the lowest bidder 
b*ing Vermile & Powers, of New York city. 
These cars are to be similar in construction 
to the 12-yard Oliver and Western dump 
cars now in use. The cars will be 15 feet 
long, 8 feet wide, equipped with Tower 
M. C. B. couplers and Westinghouse auto- 
matic air brakes. They will be of exceed- 
ingly strong construction, in order to stand 
the hard usage given cars on the Isthmus. 

Bids have been asked for 200 dump cars 
similar in construction to the 12-yard Oliver 
and Western dump cars, now in service on 
the Isthmus. 

Galveston Cutler Made at Gorgona. ■ 

A Galveston cutter has been fitted on 
dredge Xo. 82, the 20-inch pipe-line suc- 
tion dredge at work making the channel to 



10 



THE CANAL RECORD 



NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



{Coiiliniced) 



the Gatun receiving docks. The new cutter 

is working well. Similar cutters were or- 
dererl in the States some time ago, but de- 
lay in receiving them was attended with so 
much loss in the dred.ging, that the Atlantic 
Division designed a cutter, and Gorgona 
foundrv cast it in phosphor-bronze. 

A Month With the Dredges. 

Of the total of 3,252,506 cubic yards of 
material excavated in August, the dredges 
in the Atlantic and Pacific Division took 
out 1,375,991 cubic yards. A table is ap- 
pended showing the work done by each 
dredge. It will be noticed that the total 
does not agree with that given above. This 
is because the excavation b_v a 20-inch suction 
dred.ge in the channel leading to the re- 
ceiving dock at Gatun Locks, and that 
done b}' a 16-inch suction dredge at work in 
Folks River, making a fill for a corral, were 
not included in the excavation returns for 
Canal work in August. 

Local conditions affect the results on the 
Pacific and Atlantic sides. At the Pacific 
end of the Canal the three dredges are work- 
ing in good material and so near to the ma- 
rine shops at La Boca that little time is lost 
in making repairs and taking the crews to 
and from work. The dredges in Linion Bav 
are some distance from their base of sup- 
plies, and repairing is a matter of some time. 
On the Atlantic end the material in which 
the dredges are at work is not difficult to 
handle, although probabh- not so easily ex- 
cavated as that at the Pacific terminus. 

For the sea-going suction dredges Culebra 
and Ancoii, the measurements are scow or 
liin measurements, but for all other dredges 
the measurements are made in place, by 
soundings and cross sections, 

ATi,.\NTic Division. 



Name and class of 
Dredge. 



Excava- 
tion. 
Cu. yds. 



Ancon (sea-going sue- 1 

tionl. 
.Vo. / 1 French ladder).... 
.\o- 6 (French ladder).... 


335,846 

135,610 

130.210 

18,620 

17,931 

9,943 

51,505 


Earth. 

Earth. 
Earth. 


Cha!!:rcs (dipper) ( 


Roclj and earth. 


No, S2 (20-inch suction). 


Earth. 


Pacific Division. 



Culebra Csea-going suc- 
tion). 

Gopher (sea-going lad- 
der. French). 

-Vo. <Si (French ladder). 



431.296 
161.538 
144,890 






Mud. 

Mud aTid coral 

rock. 
Mud. 



Machinery from Paraiso. 

Paraiso shops were closed August 15 and 
the machinery was distributed amon.g other 
shops of the Commission. To supplement 
the articles on Isthmian Mechanical ShopL 
that have been published in The C.\>f.\i, 
Record since July S, a list of the machines 
added to the various .shops is appended: 

Empire shops: One saw table; one 12-inch 
lathe; one wood-boring machine, 24-inch; 
one 33-inch by 33-inch by 10-foot planer; 
two emery grinders; one S-i-iuch drill press; 
one 20-inch drill press; one Valley City 
grinder; one Manninij, Maxwell and Moore 
tool grinder; one IS-inch engine lathe; one 
8-inch LeBlonde engine lathe; one tool 



grinder; one 24-inch shaper; one .saw grinder, 
Higb}-; one twist drill grinder; one Oester- 
lein drill grinder; one grindstone, power; 
one 30-ton forcing press; one 16-inch hori- 
zontal boring machine; one pipe bending ma- 
chine, V2-inch to 2-inch; one 6-inch pipe cut- 
ting and threading machine; one 12-iuch 
pipe cutting and threading machine; one 
60-inch Universal radial drill; one 26-inch 
sliding head drill press; one 4-inch turret 
lathe; one screw cutting lathe; one Schu- 
macher, Boye and Emnies screw cutting 
lathe; one quick-chan.ge lathe; one tool-room 
engine lathe; one horizontal Higb\- machine 
cold saw; one 100-pound Bradlc}' hammer, 
cushion helve; one vertical boring and 
turning mill. 

Pacific Division: One sand dryer complete. 

Central Division: One duplex pump, 12- 
inch by Si/i-inch by 10-inch. 

Las Cascadas: One 46-inch sliding head 
drill press. 

Gorgona Shops: One 18-inch LeBlonde 
engine lathe; one American type LeBlonde 
engine lathe; one triple gear lathe; one 48- 
inch rotary blower fan; one cross-compound 
air pump; one plate flanging clamp; one 48- 
inch splitting shears; one double punch and 
shear, 36-inch throat; one hand-power spur- 
ring shears, 36-inch; one d-iuble-head 2-inch 
bolt cutter; one Universal milling machine; 
one rotary betting roll; one hand-power 
bending roll; one sheet folder, 3 feet 5 inches; 
one single frame drop steam hammer, Niles- 
Bement works; one engine, Marine upright 
8-inch by 10-inch. 



Walking on Railroad Tracks. 

The following notice will be printed in 
Engli.sh and several European languages 
and posted in labor camps, railroad sta- 
tions and other places where it is likely to 
be read by people using the railroad tracks 
as a highwa}': 

All iiersous are T\-amed against walking on rail- 
road tracks, except when it is neces.sary to do so in 
the discharge of their duties as employes of the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission or Panama Railroad Com- 
pany. When it is necessary for such persons to 
walk on tracks to perform their duties, they are 
urged to take the following precautions for their 
safety: 

When walking on parallel double tracks take the 
track to your left, trains using the track will ap- 
proach you from the front, whereas trains using the 
track to your right will approach you from behind 
and may run you down before you hear them. 

When you see a train do not step from the track 
on which the train is approaching, to the other 
track, but step into the ditch at the side of the track. 
If you cross to the other track there is danger that 
you ma.y be run down from behind by a train on that 
track, which you haye not heard on account of the 
noise of the first train. 

If the approaching train is a dirt train, stand as 
far back from the track as you can conveniently, to 
avoid injury by rock and earth falling from moving 
dirt tniins. 

A large proportion of the accidents occurring on 
the railroad tracks could be avoided if the persons 
who are obliged to walk on the tracks would adopt 
hese simple precautions. 



Steamer "Sanidad." 

An old French steamer, known as water 
boat "No. 2," has been rebuilt at the La 
Boca shipwaj-sand, bearing the name Sani- 
dad, is now ready for service. Unless the 
steamer Riversdalc, which may be purchased 
by the Commission, is turned over to the 
Department of Sanitation, the Sanidad will 
be used in the service between Panama and 
Taboga sanitarium. The steamer is 90 feet 
long, 12 feet wide and draws 9 feet. Stor- 
age tanks in the hold have a capacity of 100 



tons of water and the deck can accommo- 
date 100 people. When the new boat is put 
in the Tabogo service the Petite Louise will 
go out of commission. 



Fatal Wreck at Miraflores. 

Two French engines on the work at Mir- 
aflores, coupled together, fell off the east 
trestle crossing the Cocoli river on September 
3. Rejelio Castillo, Juan Sanchez, and 
Coementi Gonzales were killed, Rivio 
Arios was severelj- injured and died before 
he reached the hospital. 

The accident occurred at 11.06 o'clock in 
the morning when the men were going to 
meet the labor train at the lunch hour. As 
the track approaching the trestle is laid on 
a new fill, it is apparent from the evidence 
thus far gathered that the head engine upon 
approaching the rigid trestle structure, was 
derailed with a heavy drift to the left. Up- 
on leaving the deck this engine struck one 
of the bents, knocking it down and pulling 
the other en,gine through the breach thus 
produced. The trestle withstood the wreck 
with comparatively slight injury. 



village Improvements at Gatun. 

Work on the road from Gatun to Mount 
Hope is making satisfactory progress, and 
about four miles of the six proposed have 
already been graded. The whole road will 
be graded before the begiunin.g of the dry 
season. Between the old village of Gatun 
and the new village the work of macadam- 
izing is in progress. The main road will not 
be macadamized until crushed stone is re- 
ceived from Porto Bello. 

A commissary of the type of that at Culebra 
has been authorized for Gatun, and will be 
built near the present station on the west side 
of the Panama railroad tracks. It will be 99 
feet and 4 inches long and 59 feet and 4 
inches wide, and will be provided with cold 
stora.ge facilities. Alongside of the com- 
missary building the Panama Railroad Com- 
pany is preparing to build a new station. 

On the hill near the water tank in Gatun, 
at one of the highest points in the village, a 
type chapel and lodge room is in process 
of construction. A new post-office will be 
begun shortly, and it is probable that it will 
be located alongside the church, or across 
the road from it. 



Rails for Gatun Handling Plant, 

Twenty-five thousand feet of 90-pound 
rails will be required for the tracks on which 
the cablewa}- towers will run at Gatun Locks 
and the material-handling docks. Requisition 
has been made for this amount of track. 



Information Wanted. 

Information is desired by his relatives as 
to the whereabouts of G. M. Eichhorn, who 
was at one time engaged in business at An- 
con. Any intelligence concerning him that 
is sent to the office of The Canal Record 
will be forwarded to his family in the States. 



A party composed of the Resident Engi- 
neer, assistant engineers, and superintend- 
ents of construction of the Central Division, 
numbering twenty in all, made an inspection 
of the work of the Atlantic Division on Labor 
Da.y. At Gatun the Division En,gineer and 
his assistants conducted the Central Division 
men over the dam, spillway, and lock works, 
and later entertained them at luncheon. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



11 



HIGHEST STEAM SHOVEL RECORDS. 

Work of Shovels 256 and 113— Other Good 
Records in August. 

Steam shovel No. 256, at work at Mata- 
cliin, surpassed all e.s:cavation records made 
since the begfinning of American control, by 
taking out 55,419 cubic yards of material in 

25 days in August, Shovel No. 263, work- 
ing in Culebra Cut has the second high 
record for the month, having excavated 
32,979 cubic yards in Culebra District, in 16 
days and 12,786 cubic }-ards in Empire Dis- 
trict, in 10 days a total of 45,765 cubic yards 
of material in the 26 days. Shovel No. 115 
at work at San Pablo, broke all records for 
shovels in the 70-ton cla.ss, e.\-cavating22,02S 
cubic yards of earth and 20,333 cubic yards 
of rock, a total of 42,361 cubic yards for the 

26 days. Other high records follow: 

Atlantic Division. 



Central Division. 



Shovel 
No. 


Earth, 
Cubic yds. 


Rock, 
Cubic yds. 


Total, 
Cubic yds. 


No. of 
days at 
work. 


133 .... 

113 .... 


10,552 ' 5,757 
1,114 ] 204 


16,309 
1,318 


25 
5 


GATDN LOCKS. 


102 .... 

129 .... 


l,82(f 1 43,694 
1,118 1 39,479 


45,514 
40:597 


26 
26 




SPILLWAY— GATUN DAM. 




fsl :::: 


6.084 
17.360 


16,396 ! 22,480 
1,450 1 18,810 


26 
26 


Central Division. 

TABERNILLA DISTRICT. 


115.... 
114 .... 


22,023 20,333 42,361 
17,439 I 16,093 33,537 


26 
26 


GORGONA DISTRICT. 


256 .... 
104 ... 


39,901 
35,151 


15,518 


55,419 
35,151 


25 
26 








EAS OBISPO DISTRICT. 


215 .... 

252 


17,494 


26,242 
42,408 


43.736 
42,408 


25 
22 








EMPIRE DISTRICT. 


262 




41,248 41,248 
40,816 1 40,816 


26 


204 




26 








CULEBRA DISTRICT. 


217.... 
224 .... 


16.4S0 26,782 
22.672 15,751 


43.262 
88,423 


26 
26 


PEDRO MIGUEL. 


209 


31.949 
13,869 




31,949 
28,899 


24 


264 .... 


'15,636 


24 


OBISPO DIVERSION. 


121 


15,333 




15,333 


16 








Pacific Division, 
miraflores locks' .site. 


258 .... 
151 


37,341 
22.840 


4,149 


41,490 
22.840 


26 
25 








PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS. 


130 ... 


19.590 
2,530 




19,590 
2,530 


-J3 


50 












High Daily Records. 

Atlantic Division. 



U3 



I 

Location. 



Character ma- 
terial. 



133 Mindi Aug". 1 

113 Mindi AuK. 1 

134 Gntun locks Aug. 29 

102 Gntun locks Aug. 6 

251 Gatun spillway. Aug. 19 
119i Gatun spillway. Aug. 1 



Clay and rock 
Clay and rock 

Clay 

Rock 

Rock 

Rock 



1.48S 
480 
2,543 
2.304 
2,090 
1,350 



115 T.abemilla Aug. 27 

253 Tabeniilla Aug. 12 

256 Gorgona Aug. 27 

255 Gorgona Aug. 31 

215 Bas Obispo Aug. 10 

252 Bas Obispo Aug. 6 

204iErapire .4ug. 21 

225iEnipire Aug. 19 

224 Culebra Aug. 7 

263 Culebra Aug. 12 

2091 Pedro Miguel Aug. 31 

257|Pedro Miguel Aug. 29 



Rock and earth 

Earth 

Soft rock 

Earth 

Rock and earth 

Earth 

Rock 

Rock and earth 

Earth 

Rock and earth 
Rock and earth 
Soft rock 



2,070 
1,990 
2,250 
1.980 
2,460 
2,360 
2,880 
2,240 
2,540 
2,480 
1,780 
1,420 



Pacific Division. 



258 
151 

130 



Miraflores locks 
Miraflores locks 
Pedro Miguel 

locks 

Pedro Miguel 

locks 




Note — Shovels in the one-hundred class are 75-ton 
Bucyrus and Model 60 Marions with dippers of a 
capacity of 2V2 cubic yards. Shovels in the two- 
hundred class are 95-ton Bucyrus and Model 91 
Marions with dippers of a capacity of 5 cubic yards. 
Shovels in the fifty-class are 45 ton shovels \vith 
dippers of a capacity of 1% cubic yards. These 
shovels are under steam for eight hours per day, but 
are not actually worked during this entire period, 
time being lost by the necessity of moving the 
shovel forward, blasting stone too big for the shovel 
to handle, keeping the shovel supplied with cars, etc. 



IMPROVEMENTS ON FLAT CARS. 

Conditions on the Isthmus Have Stiggested 
Departures. 

Nowhere is equipment subjected to harder 
usage than on the Isthmus, and as a result 
many improvements have been made in 
steam shovels, cars, and other equipment to 
meet the unusual conditions. Cars used with 
the unloading plo%vs are an instance. The 
40-ton wooden flat car is used for heavj" rock 
transportation, and carries about 18 yards of 
material. Eight hundred of these cars were 
furnished the Commission by the American 
Car and Foundrj' Company. They were 
built up of two 5-inch by 9-inch center sills, 
four 5-inch by 9-inch intermediate sills, and 
two 5-inch by 14-inch side sills, each about 
40 feet long and of yellow pine. These sills, 
were floored over with 2%-inch planks run- 
ning transversely. The car is mounted on 
two simplex trucks with 5-inch by 9-inch 
journals, with steel bolsters, and braced 
with six long truss rods. 

The first order of cars was equipped with 
one 3-foot gondola side, and one 1-foot re- 
movable side; but before the cars were put 
in service the Chief Engineer approved a 
suggestion that the 1-foot removable side be 
displaced by a side extension. This extension 
was carried on cast iron brackets bolted to 
the side sill, and it extended the car floor 
15 inches. The utility of this change was 
immediately noticed in the increased capac- 
ity of the car, and in the dumping of mate- 
rial farther away from the trucks. 

One of the largest items of upkeep on 
cars was the cost of renewing and repairing 
"aprons." Each of the flat cars carries at 
one end an apron 117'/2 inches long and 44 
inches wide, made of %-inch sheet steel, 
and so hinged to the car that one edge of it 
rests on the next car, thus covering the space 
between the cars in the train and making it 
possible to run the unloading plow the full 
length of the train. These aprons were con- 
tinually being torn off by the plows during 
the unloading operations at the dumps. 
This trouble has been obviated by a design 
of apron hinge and support which brings 
the apron slightly below the level of the 
car floor and little beyond the end of the 



car. One end of the apron is supported by 
the forward car and the other rests on cast 
iron bracket supports bolted to the end sill 
of the car to which the apron is attached. 
The hinges were so designed that they offer 
no obstruction to the moving plow. 

As the plow gives considerable side 
thrust on the gondola side of the car, a spe- 
cial design of high stake-pocket has been 
made to take up this strain and keep the 
sides vertical. This stake-pocket runs up 
on the side stakes about one foot above the 
sill and the thrust on the pocket is taken up 
b}' a 1-inch "U" bolt running diagonally- 
down from the top of the pocket to the first 
intermediate sill. Further bracing has been 
added to bring the thrust on the lo%ver part 
of the side sill, due to the push on the high 
side, across the car to the other sill. 

A recent improvement is the addition of a 
"bull nose" to the end of a high side of the 
car. This "bull nose" is made of V4-inch 
steel plateand is so shaped that it surrounds 
the entire end of the side, and guides the 
plow from car to car in the train. Before 
this devise was put on the sides of the car 
it was not unusual for the unloading plow 
to batter and break the end of a side so 
badly that the car would be taken out of 
service for repairs. 

EXECUTIVE ORDER. 

Under authority vested in me by law, it is 
ordered: 

Section 344 of the Penal Code of the Ca- 
nal Zone is amended to read as follows: 

"Section 344. Grand larceny is punish- 
able b}' imprisonment in the penitentiary 
not exceeding ten years." 

Theodore Roosevelt. 
The White House, 

Washington, D. C, Aue;. 14, 190S. 



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS. 

Requests for Transfer of Hmployes. 

Circular No. 199. 

Effective September 1. 190S : Requests for the 
transfer of employes will be submitted to the Chair- 
man for approval in the same manner as applications 
for increase of force or pay. All requests for trans- 
fers should show clearly to what vacancy in the 
authorized organization the employe transferred will 
be assigned. 

Geo. W. Goethals, 
Chaimian. 

Culebra. C. Z.. August 31. 1908. 

Acting Purchasing Agent. 

Circular No. 200. 

Pending the appointment of a Purchasing Agent 
for the Canal Zone on the Isthmus, I,ieut. R. E. 
Wood. Assistant Chief Quartermaster %vill, effective 
September 1. 1908. act in that capacity. 

Geo. W. Goethals, 
Chairman and Chief Ensineer. 
Culebra. C. Z.. September 1. 190S. 



Designing Bngiueers. 

To All Concerned: 

During the absence of Mr. I,. D. Cornish, Mr. 
H. F. Tucker will be in charge of the force of Design- 
ing Engineers attached to the office of the Assistant 
Chief Engineer. 

H. F. Hodges, 
Assistant Chief Engineer. 
Culebra, C. Z.. September 4, 1903. 

Division of ivlaterial and Supplies. 

Circular. 

Lieut, R. E. Wood. Assistant Chief Quartermaster, 
will assume temporary charge of the general office 
of the Material and Supplies Division. 

All correspondence formerly handled by this diW- 
sion will be addressed to the Assistant Chief Quar- 
termaster at Cristobal, until further orders. 

C. A. Devol. 
Chief Quarter master. 

Culebra, C. Z., September 1, 1908. 



12 



THE 'CANAL R'ECORD 



' UTILIZING OLD DREDGES. 

French Equipment to be Put In Service 
After Twenty Years of Idleness. 

Two dredges that have been resting in 
the mud on the west bank of the Chagres 
River near I'rijoles since the days of the 
old French Company are being floated, and 
in a few weeks will be at the Cristobal dry 
docks. Their machinery will be stripped 
and the parts put to use in repairing the 
French ladder dredges that are at work in 
the Canal prism in Limon Bay. The hulls 
will be patched up and used as barges in 
the service of the Atlantic Division. 

These dredges are of the "ladder" type, 
and are twnns. An endless chain of 19 
buckets is drawn over a boom which pro- 
jects from the bow and holds the buckets 
against the material to be excavated. The 
buckets dump the spoil into a hopper near 
the center of the hull, whence it runs out of 
a chute at the side into a tender. This chain 
of buckets, and the machinery to run it and 
to propel the dredge are mounted on a hull 
about 110 feet long by 28 feet wide, made of 
wrought iron, and fitted with coal bunkers, 
and quarters for a crew. Two large boilers 
and duplex, steeple compound engines fur- 
nish power for propelling the dredge and 
running the chain of buckets. A small 
boiler furnishes steam for the pumps and 
the winch engines. All the machinery is in 
good condition, because of careful oiling and 
painting before the dredges were abandoned. 
The cogs are little worn, the dipper lips 
still sharp, and in general the condition of 
the machinery indicates that the dredges 
were used but little by the French. On one 
of the castings of each engine is the legend: 

FORGES ET CH.\NTIERS 

DE LA 

MEDITERRANEB 

HAVRE, 1884. 

There is a reasonably authentic story that 
these two barges were brought to the Isth- 
mus in 1885 and set up at Chagrecito, whence 
they were floated to their operating ground 
in the Chagres river near Frijoles. After a 
few weeks of work it was decided not to con- 
tinue their use at that time, and one of them 
was set at work excavating a bay in the 
river bank in which both dredges could be an- 
chored free from the dangers of sudden rises 
in the Chagres. The dredge which made 
the bay has for years had her nose against 
the side of the bank as though onlj' resting 
over night in her work. Into this little bay 
the second dredge and two tenders were run, 
all of them to wait until the old French 
Company should need their services again. 

In the more than 20 years since the 
dredges and their tenders were put on 
waiting orders the bay silted up until 
the hulls rested above the normal stage of 
the river during the rainy season, A bank 
of sand six feet high or more closed up the 
mouth of the bay, and when the work of 
reclaiming the dredges began four weeks 
ago, a tree 40 feet high was growing in this 
sand bank, barring the way between the 
dredges and the river. 

To bring these dredges from their berths 
of silt into the channel of the Chagres, 
whence they may be floated to Cristobal, is 
the work assigned to a gang of 40 men. A 
channel 40 feet wide is being dug from the 
river to the dredges. Back of the place wher 
the dredges lie is a little stream and this has 
been diverted so that it will find the river by- 



way of the dredges and the 40- foot channel. 
A pump with a capacity of 160 gallons a 
minute is being rigged up and four jets of 
water will be thrown by it onto the silt bed 
on which the dredges rest. This hydraulic 
power will wash out the old bay and deepen 
the channel to the river so that the dredges 
may be floated into the stream. 

The tenders are fitted with a hopper to 
catch the spoil from the dredges, and with 
pumps to force it through a pipe line to the 
dump. It required two boats and two sets 
of machinery under the old dredging sj-stera 
to accomplish what is now done by a suction 
dredge. In the old dredges each bucket 
has a capacity of one-half of a yard and 
the continuous movement gives a high ex- 
cavating efficiency. Working in m id in 
Limon Bay, dredges similar to these have 
taken out nearly 150,000 cubic yards 
in 26 days, about half the capacity of the 
the 20-inch suction dredges. Still the cost 
of excavation with the old style dredge is 
three times as great as with the suction 
dredge. 

One of the tenders is fitted with a single 

boiler, an engine for propulsion, and a 

pump for forcing out the spoil, while the 

other has two boilers, an engine and a pump. 

Cast into the framework of each engine are 

the words: 

Soci^t^ Anonyine Franco-Belgre 

Pour Kt Construction 

de Machines et de Materiels de Cherain de Fer 

Paris 

Ateliers de la Croyere. Belgique 

Systeme Ch. Bourdon, Brevete S. C. D. C. 

No .... 18S5. 

A camp has been established on one of the 
dredges where the laborers will mess and 
sleep until the work is done. 

In much the same position as the dredges 
near Frijoles are a ladder dredge, two suc- 
tion dredges, two tenders and a barge at 
Chagrecito. They too were run into a bay 
made in the bank, and have silted up until 
they are 15 feet above the normal stage of 
the river in the rainy season. A gang is at 
work digging a channel from the river to 
the first of these dredges, the ladder dredge. 
The sluicing plan in use at Frijoles will be 
adopted unless it is found more practicable 
to slide the dredge on skids into the river. 
It is proposed to use the hull as a barge. 
The machinery has already been stripped. 

Behind the ladder dredge and broadside 
to the river, with jungle on three sides and 
some bushes in front, are the suction dredges. 
Both hulls and machinerj- are in good con- 
dition and, although of an old type, they 
could be made serviceable if their use were 
deemed economical. The intake is 16 inches 
in diameter and is equipped with the French 
type of side cutter or agitator. The pump 
on each is a 16-inch split suction pump, belt- 
driven by an old French cross-compound 
engine. The hoist or swinging gear is 
operated by a series of drums on deck, 
driven by a duplex vertical engine. The 
tenders are of the type at Frijoles. 

It has not yet been decided whether the 
suction dredges and tenders at Chagrecito 
are worth taking to the shops at Cristobal. 

The old French dredges at Chagrecito, 
and all north of that point, have been as- 
signed to the Atlantic Division, while those 
in the territory south of Chagrecito have 
been turned over to the Pacific Division. 
At present four of the old ladder dredges, 
that have been lying idle, south of Chag- 
recito, are being put to use, and out of 



them one thoroughly good dredge is to be 

built. 

When the old French company abandon- 
ed its work on the Isthmus, it left at La 
Boca a large amount of floating equipment, 
among which was the hull of a ladder dredge. 
It was in good condition when the Amer- 
icans took control, but its value was doubt- 
ful and it was in the way, so it was taken 
to an unused part of the harbor and sunk. 
Later developments showed that it was still 
in the way, .so it was raised and sunk in a 
different part of the harbor. Here, too, it 
was in the way, and it was towed out be- 
yond the harbor bar and sunk in deep water. 
Now, the French ladder dredges having 
proved to be so much more effective than was 
at first believed possible, the thrice sunk 
hull has been raised again and is at the 
shipways at La Boca, being prepared for 
work. It has no old machinerj' in it to be 
taken out, and only a few of the plates need 
to be renewed. To get inachiner\- and install 
it is all that needs to be done. 

At San Pablo, near Barbacoas Bridge, on 
the south bank of the Chagres, is a dredge 
that has silted up, just as those at Frijoles 
and Chagrecito have. At Juan Grande, just 
north of Gorgona, is another dredge high 
up on the bank. Both these dredges can Tie 
seen from the Panama railroad. Back of 
Gorgona are two old dredges, also high on 
the river bank. No effort will be mide to 
float these dredges. The Pacific Division 
is taking out the machinery and other parts 
and bringing them to La Boca, to be used in 
fitting up the old hull already mentioned, 
and in supplying parts to the dredges now 
in use. The machinery and parts are in good 
condition andean be utilized without change. 

Two boilers from the dredges at Gorgona 
and one from that at Juan Grande are to be 
installed in the old hull. Two steeple com- 
pound engines, a deck winch, and a ladder 
boom from the dredges at Gorgona will also 
be utilized, and the 32 buckets will be col- 
lected from the four stripped dredges, un- 
less it be decided to fit the dredge with 
close-connected buckets. It will cost be- 
tween $35,000 and $40,000 to make this lad- 
der dredge as good as new, and capable of 
taking out 180,000 cubic yards of material a 
month at from 7 to 10 cents a j-ard. 



UNCLAIMED PACKAGES. 



The following is a list of packages that 
have been forwarded from New York to 
Isthmian Canal Commission and Panama 
railroad employes, and that are waiting to 
be claimed at the freight house at Colon. 
The owners of these packages ivill have to 
make application for free customs entry in 
connection with Circular No. 85, or in the 
alternative, pay dut}- to the Panama Gov- 
ernment customs on the value of the con- 
tents of the packages, before delivery can 
be effected: charges 

to collect. 
Way-bill No. 165— Jas. Vaugher (or Vaughn) . 
Culebra. 1 box, e.v Dunottar Castle : Jipnuary 

15. 1903 1.00 

Way-bill No. 207— P. G. Baker. Colon, 1 case, ex 

Panama; April 24, 1903 .'. 1.00 

Way-bill No. 201— C. E. Weidman, Cristobal. 1 

case hats, ex Finance : April 9. 1903 1.00 

Way-bill No. Ill— S. G, M., Cristobal. 1 box 

hardware, e.r AdTattce August 25, 1907 1.00 

No. 7503— Jos. V. Sadler. Pedro Miguel, 1 par- 
cel, ex Finance ; March 14. 1903 prepaid 

No. 7321— J. M. Chura.icero. Colon, 1 parcel, 
ex Dunottar Castle : November 24, 1907 prepaid 



THE CANAL RECORD 



13 



ISTHMIAN MECHANICAL SHOPS. 
VI. 

Marine Shops at La Boca. 

Under every plan suggested for the Pan- 
ama Canal, La Boca has been made the Pa- 
cific terminus. The old French company 
dredged a ch;:nnel from deep water to where 
the wharves are now located, and from the 
wharves two miles up the valley of the Rio 
Grande. To do such work required consid- 
erable floating equipment, and to keep that 
equipment in repair the marine shops at La 
Boca were built. On the failure of the first 
French company the Panama Railroad Com- 
pany bought the channel and dock, and in 
April, 1900, it rented the machine .shop and 
shipways for 1 per cent of 50 per cent of 
their original cost. It also rented one 
Scotch ladder dredge and two Scotch clap- 
ets with which to keep open the channel to 
the docks. The shipways were rebuilt at a 
cost of ,$14,000, the ladder dredge was re- 
paired at a cost of ?39,000 and the clapets at 
a cost of $12,000 and $14,000 respectively. 

Considering the period and the work that 
they were designed to do, the old French 
shops were well equipped. Their machinerj* 
consisted of three 36-inch lathes, one 12- 
inch lathe, one 8-inch lathe, one 16-foot 
pit lathe, one 10-inch shaper, one 12-inch 
Blotter, one 12-inch planer, one 500-pound 
power hammer, one 6-foot radial drill, and 
two drill presses. The machine shops, car- 
penter shop, and tool room were all in' one 
building. No new machinery was added by 
the Panama Railroad Company and the 
shops were operated as they were left by the 
French, under the Panama Railroad Com- 
pany, until January 16, 1905, when the Divi- 
sion of Material and Supplies of the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission took charge of them. 
In June, 1905, they were turned over to 
the Department of Construction and Engi- 
neering, being run under the Division En- 
gineer at La Boca, and they are now in 
the La Boca residency of the Pacific Divi- 
sion, under the immediate charge of Su- 
perintendent James MacFarlane, who has 
been superintendent since the Panama Rail- 
road Company as.sumed control in 1900. 

In June, 1905, work was begun on a 40- 
foot by 100-foot addition to the original 
French shop, making it 200 feet long by 104 
feet wide, and later a blacksmith shop, 40 
feet by 50 feet, was added to the machine 
shop. The old French machinery was grad- 
ually retired and the present equipment 
consists entirely of up-to-date American ma- 
chines and tools. In the machine shop are 
one 12-inch planer, one 24-inch planer, tvro 
36-inch by 24-foot lathes, two 32-inch by 
12-foot lathes, two 14-inch bj- 8-foot lathes, 
two 10-inch by 8-foot lathes, one 10-inch by 
6-foot lathes, one 72-inch boring mill, one 
No. 3 Universal milling machine, one 21- 
inch shaper, one 14-inch shaper, one 18- 
inch Blotter, one 12-inch slotter, one 6-foot 
radial drill, 5 small drills. In addition 
there are sundrj' pipe-cutting and grinding 
machines. All this machinery was bought 
with a view of adapting it especially to ma- 
rine work. In the blacksmith shop are 8 
forges and one 1100-pound steam hammer. 
The pattern shop is equipped with 1 baud saw, 
1 circular sa^v, and 1 small planer. A small 
foundry is run in connection with the ma- 
chine shop, merely for the purpose of mak- 
ing small castings promptly. The cupola 



has a capacity of one ton, and there are two 
furnaces for brass crucibles capable of hold- 
ing lOU pounds of metal. 

The Ancon machine and wood working 
shops, formerly maintained by the Division 
of Building Construction, have been abol- 
ished and the machinery will presently be 
installed at the La Boca shops. It consists 
of two circular saws, one band saw, and one 
planer for the wood shop, and two lathes 
and three drill presses for the machine shop. 

At present the machinery in the machine 
shop is belt dri.en by a French compound 
engine, which takes steam from four French 
boilers. Plans have been approved for 
driving by electric motors, and two 75-horse 
power motors will be installed in a few- 
weeks. The current will be furnished by 
the new power plant at La Boca. A 15-ton 
overhead crane, now in use, is to be fitted 
with electric power 

The shipways consist of two ways on 
which ships up to 400 tons may be hauled 
out, and are equipped with one set of bend- 
ing rolls 10 feet long, four powerful punches, 
one 10-foot counter-sinking machine, one 
6-foot radial drill, one 50-ton steam riveter, 
one long reach pneumatic riveter for smoke 
stacks and other pipes, one 24-inch bv 24- 
inch sill dresser for carpenters' use. As far 
as possible all work is done by pneumatic 
tools, and in fact there is very little hand 
work, .'^t present from 12 to 14 gangs of 
riveters and 6 to 8 gangs of drillers are at 
work on the various hulls being built, or re- 
built. Power for the shipways is furnished 
by two steeple compound engines left by 
the French, fed by two Scotch marine 
boilers taken out of an old French dredge 
and five French steam-drill boilers. The 
air compressor has a capacity of 1,500 feet 
of free air per minute. In about three 
weeks it will be abandoned, when the air 
line from the new electric power and air 
compressing plant will be in operation. 

A gridiron capable of taking vessels of 3,000 
tons is under construction and will be fin- 
ished in about si.v months. A wharf 540 
feet long is bemg built behind the machine 
shops, and a storeroom for dredge parts 500 
feel by 100 feet has been authorized. 

The yard equipment consists of one 20-to n 
Brown hoist, two 8-ton Appleby cranes and 
two French locomotives. 

Both manufacturing and repairing are 
done at these shops. Repairs nmst be kept 
up on the floating equipment in the harbor, 
which consists of one sea-going suction 
dredge, one sea-going ladder dredge, one 
pipe-line suction dredge, a ladder dredge, 
a dipper dredge, three tug boats, six self- 
propelling barges (clapets), half a dozen 
smaller craft, and a dozen barges and light- 
ers. A record of the more important man- 
ufacturing work done in the last eight years 
is pertinent, because it has all entered 
largely into the work of building the Canal. 
In the fiscal year 1908, ladder dredge "A-2," 
the one which the Panama Railroad Com- 
pany bought from the French, was rebuilt. 
It has worked continuously for five years, 
with onlj- one lay-off, and tliat of only forty 
days' duration. It is on the ways now un- 
dergoing extensive repairing that amounts 
almost to rebuilding. Twenty thousand dol- 
lars will be spent on this work, and the 
dredge will then be as serviceable as when 
it was first pvt in commission. In the year 
in which dredge "A-2" was first rebuilt, 



the shops al.so rebuilt clapets No. 5 and No. 
8, and the tug Bolivar. The following vear 
three new lighters were rebuilt and several 
were repaired, and in 1903 several more 
lighters were repaired. 

.'Vn old French crane boat, the Parisiev, 
was rebuilt for the Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission in 1904 and fitted with the Clay- 
ton apparatus for fumigating ships. She 
was renamed the Waller Reed. About the 
same time the merchant ships on the Pa- 
cific making calls at Panama ports installed 
similar fumigating plants, and on this ac- 
count the trailer A'm/ has been little used. 
She is still in service, however, and is equip- 
ped to assi.st in the quarantine against 
plague, yellow fever, or cholera, in case the 
emergency arises. Clapets No. 10 and No. 
11 were rebuilt the following year. 

Two steam launches left at Culebra by the 
French were rebuilt in 1906. They are the 
Birdena and the Governor and are now in 
service. Steam launch No. 26 was also re- 
built, as were Clapets Nos. 6, 7, 9 and 1. 

Ladder dredge No. 14 was rebuilt in the 
fiscal year 1907 at a cost of $28,000. It has 
been at work since last October and has 
already justified the rebuilding. In 1908 
the sea-going ladder dredge Gopher was re- 
built and was put in commission last May. 
Most of the work on the pipe-line suction 
dredge Sandpiper, a description of which 
appeared in The Canal Record of August 
26, was done in the year 1908. There are 
now under construction at the machine shop 
and ways six sand barges, three hopper 
barges, one submarine rock breaking ma- 
chine. An old F'rench ladder dredge is 
being rebuilt. The rebuilding of the San- 
idad was also done in the fiscal year 1908. 

The force engaged at the machine shops 
and shipways consists of 150 gold men and 
650 silver men, and the amount of wages 
paid in the fiscal year 1908 was about $400,000. 
In the same year material to the value of 
about $306,500 was used. 

KxaminHtioti for Clerk. 

A local examination for the position of clerk 
in the service of the Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission will be held Sunday, September 13, 
1908, in the hall of the Red Men at Cu. 
lebra beginning at 9 a. m. Copies of the 
Manual of Examinations, containing all nec- 
essary information and sample questions, 
and copies of the prescribed application form, 
will be furnished upon written request by 
the Secretary of the Isthmian Civil Service 
Board, Office of the Chairman, Culebra, Ca- 
nal Zone. 

The examination is open to citizens of 
the United States between the ages of 20 and 
45 years. Persons intending to enter the ex- 
amination should file their applications at 
once, in order that requisition maj- be made 
for sufficient papers and other necessary ar- 
rangements completed by the Board of Ex- 
aminers. 

Exaraination lor Physician. 

A local examination for the position of 
physician in the service of the Isthmian Ca- 
nal Commission, entrance salary $1,800 per 
annum, will be held October 14, 1908, the 
exact hour and place of the examination to 
be announced later. The Manual of Exam- 
inations, containing all necessary informa- 
tion and Application I-'orm, may be obtained 
from the Secretary of the Isthmian Civil 
Service Board, ofSce of the Chairman, Cule- 
bra. Canal Zone. 



14 



THE CANAL RECORD 



LEVELING OF PRECISION. 

Mean Ssa-Level as Determined on Data 
Available at This Time. 

That there is uo material difference be- 
tween mean sea-level in the Pacific and the 
Atlantic oceans is one of the interesting 
facts developed by the leveling of precision 
recently done on the Isthmus. W. G. Com- 
ber, Resident Engineer at La Boca, in his 
report under date of August 25, gives details 
of the work and results. The descriptions 
of bench-marks will be published in separate 
form for distribution among the engineers. 
In his letter submitting the report, Mr. Com- 
ber recommends that some official be placed 
in charge of the bench-marks and be held 
responsible for their care and maintenance, 
so that in case it is necessary at any time to 
move a bench-mark the work may be done 
under the direction of this official, who will 
see to it that the elevation is preserved. In 
accordance with the recommendation C. M. 
Saville, assistant engineer, has been charged 
with this duty. The report follows: 

The preci.se levelers. Me-ssrs. Thomas aud Wol- 
brecht, reported to me on their arrival from New 
York on June 2. and after a consultation in regard 
to methods and scope of work it was decided to get 
the value of mean tides on each side from the Divi- 
sion of MeteoroloE%' and River Hydraulics and use 
these values as zeros, workiuE from each side. Mr. 
Wolbrecht was a.ssigned to the Cristobal end of the 
work and Mr. Thomas to the I,a Boca side. In addi- 
tion to the standard bench-marks made and placed 
purposely for this survey the levelers were instructed 
to connect with every permanent bench-mark adja- 
cent to their line. 

Field work was begun on June 7 on the Atlantic 
side, and June S on the Pacific .side, aud finished 
July 31, on both .sides, two days of this time being 
devoted to the determination of instrumejital con- 
stants. 

Kach party consisted of an obser\'er. recorder, two 
rodmen, negro cook and si.x negro laborers for pro- 
pelling the handcar, cutting of trochas, etc. Kern 
precise levels, with Kern & Fauth level tubes, were 
used. The usual niethodsof keepin.qr backsights and 
foresights equal, and checking all lines by going over 
them in opposite directions, were followed. The 
instruments were disturbed by passing trains and 
blasting so frequently that, in order to insure good 
results, each reading was checked by changing the 
height of instruments and recording the second set 
of reading.s— the nieansof the two sets were taken and 
the stretch was checked in the opposite direction by 
the .same jnethods. 

On the line. Cristobal to San Pablo, Mr. Wolbrecht 
reports his main line of level as 2,i.3 miles, with 16 
miles of side line. Side lines were run to determine 
the elevation of bench-marks along the relocated 
Panama railroad and above the level of Oatun I,ake. 
On the main line 55 circuits were run, varying in 
length from 225 meters to 1,700 meters; the average 
discrepancy between the direct and reverse runs of 
these circuits was 1.25 millimeters, the greatest differ 
encebeing.1. 8 millimeters. The probable error of the 
last bench-mark for the above line was 4.06 millime- 
ters, and the probable error for the entire distance 
is 0.66 millimeters per kilometer. 

On the stretch leveled by Mr. Thomas, San Pablo to 
La Boca, the length of main line was 24. 1 miles, the 
length of side line 18.6 miles. The probable error of 
the last bench-mark is 2.7 millimeters and the proba- 
ble error per kilometer is 0.45 millimeters. The 
largest discrepancy on the main line between succes- 
sive bench-marks was 2.S millimeters. 

Over the whole distance nni, Cristobal to l,a Boca, 
standard bench-marks have been set. consisting of a 
concrete slab. IS inches by IS inches by 6 inches, with 
rounded comers, suitably lettered, with a copper or 
brass bolt set in the center of the concrete block, 
forming the point of elevation; block is buried about 
three feet in the ground with a 4-inch galvanized 
iron pipe centered over the bolt in the slab and pro- 
jecting about IS inches from the ground; the pipe 
is surmounted by a cast br.ass cap, suitabl.v inscribed, 
with a projection rising from the center of same. 

It is intended that all ordiimry level elevations 
shall be taken from the top of this projection on the 
center of the cap. and in case greater accuracy is re- 
quired, or if the pipe has been disturbed, that the 
cap shall be taken off and rod placed on bolt in tile; 
two special pipe wrenches are neces.sarj- in taking 
off the cap. All of these bench-marks, except where 



in! an'inclosure. are inclosed with a wire fence 
painted white, with a sign warning against disturb- 
ance. 

These bench-marks are placed in pairs across the 
Isthmus, the front one usually being near the Canal 
and the Panama railroad, the back one at some dis- 
tance from the front one, and over the countr,\' 
to be covered by the Galim I.ake. above the S5-fool 
level and near the new Panama railrojul. The front 
bench-marks are numbered 1,2.3,4. etc. , consecutively 
from Cristobal, and the back bench-marks are num- 
bered la, 2a, 3a, 4a, etc., the number showing to which 
front bench-mark it belongs, the letter ■'.\" indicating 
that it isa back bench-mark. Front bench-marks are 
about one mile apart. Two back bench-marks at San 
Pablo are omitted on account of uncertiiinty of loca- 
tion of the new Panama railroad. 

All lines were nm in accordance with practice of 
the U. S. Coast and Geodetic Sur\-ey, and of the Mis- 
sissippi River Commission. 

On investig tion of the tide-gage records at Cristo- 
bal as furnished by the Department of Meteorology 
and River Hydraulics, it was found that a period of 
fifteen months only was available for determining 
the mean sea-level on each side; and on the I,a Boca 
side the Naos Island tide-gage records were abso- 
lutely useless on account of the impossibility of con- 
necting the levels with this gage. On the completion 
of the breakwater, however, these records will become 
available. 

As tidal oscillation is so small on the Atlantic side, 
and the mean of hourly readings from May, 1907, to 
August, 1908, was found to be only 0.02 feet higher 
than the former zero, or mean sea-level, but as the 
present tide staff gage was slightly in error and no 
record of the status of former ones used was available, 
it was decided not to change the zero, or mean sea- 
level now in use, until records of longer duration and 
more aiUhentic value could be secured. 

The old value therefore of bench-mark Spike, which 
is near the tide-gage, 6.21 feet, was adopted as an in- 
itial point in tabulating results. This bench-mark 
was found to agree within 0.003 foot with Municipal 
bench-mark No. 36, which latter is the basis of the 
old levels run in the neighborhood of Cristobal. 

From bench-mark Bridge 12 (the new value of which 
agrees very closely with the former value) to the suc- 
ceeding old bench-marks southward, a discrepancy 
of about 0.17 feet was observed between the old and 
new values, aud in order to eliminate any doubt that 
might arise from this sudden divergence, the circuit 
from bench-mark Bridge 12 to Panama railroad bench- 
mark No. 9 was re-nm at the conclusion of the work, 
and the precise level values verified. The levels in 
the center of the Isthmus, as shown by Panama rail- 
road values, are about 0.304 feet in error. 

The mean of hourly readings on the La Boca tide- 
gage, from August 1, 1907, to August 1, 190S, equals 
0.547 feet, and the elevation of the zero of the gage, 
as shown by precise levels from Cristobal equals 
n.l74 feet, making the elevation of mean tide at La 
Boca, as determined by the j-ear's tide-gage records, 
0.721 feet. 

I do not think it possible to arrive at a tmedetermi- 
nation of mean tide at La Boca, when we compare re- 
sults from the tide-gage here. I give the monthly 
mean of hourly gage readings from July I, 1907. to 
July 31, 1908: 

July, 1907 -f.91 January. 1908 -|-.1S 

August, 1907 -f .82 February, 1908 —.11 

Seiitember, 1907. . . , -i-.78 March, 1908 —.12 

October. 1907 -J-.87 April, 1908 -|-.I8 

November, 1907 -|-.93 May, 1908 +,64 

December, 1907 -f.86 June, 1908 +.80 

July, 1908 +.73 . 

You will see by the above table that the low means 
on the La Boca gage correspond to the dry months 
and the trade-wind season, and how much of the high 
means of the wet season are attributable to the Rio 
Grande water and how much to the trade winds are 
unknown quantities, but it certainly would seem to 
indicate that the results from the I,a Boca gage are 
worthless, except for local use, and that we must fall 
back on the Naos record when we can connect with 
the Naos gage on the*new breakwater. 

Taking the results of the dry season months, \nz: 
January. February. March, and April, for 1908, we get 
a mean reading on the l,a Boca gage of +.0325 feet in- 
stead of 0.547, the mean for the year; this would make 
the difference between the Atlantic and Pacific 
means, as determined by precise levels. 0.2065. 

When we have arrived at an accurate mean for tidal 
elevations at this place I should consider that the 
proper method to treat the elevations would be to 
make an adjustment throughout the Isthmus, giving 
both elevations of mean sea-level the same value, viz: 
zero. 

A table of descriptions and elevations, of both new 
and old bench-marks, connected with on this survey 
is appended, and n tabulation of final results to date 
is filed in this office. 



LETTERS FROM THE LINE. 

Privations in the Early Days. 

The Canal R];c ird: 

.\ number of former employes of the Com- 
mission chanced to read, in your issue of 
July 29, or thereabouts, a letter from a Mr, 
Norman Winnie, recounting some of the 
hardships endured by the "Old Timers" 
who came to the Isthmus when he did. 
Some of us over here arrived on the Isth- 
mus in the summer of 1904, and one of us 
lived at Culebra from August, 1904, to May, 
1905, leaving there for Empire. We all re- 
member when the tents, all of which had 
floors, were erected in Culebra, and Mr. 
Winnie's statement that he was obliged to 
"sleep on the ground" will hardly hold 
water. The Isthmus in 1904 and the early 
part of 1905 was hardly a paradise, but there 
were cots enough to go around, even if we 
had to use powder bo.xes for morris chairs, 
'If any employe of the Commission slept on 
the ground, it was from choice, or because 
he was physically unable to react his quar- 
ters — unless he was on one of the upper 
Chagres topography parties. Wliat do some 
of the real "Old Timers," who remember 
the Culebra morris chairs and the first days 
of the Chapman mess, have to say about this? 
W, I. Baucus, 
L. M. Huntington, 
H. B. Rowland. 
Santiago de Cuba, August 20, 1908. 



Masonic Organizations. 

The Cax.\l Record: 

I wish to call j'our attention to an inaccur- 
acj- under the headingof "Social Life of the 
Zone" in your issue of July 15, 1908, in which 
you speak of Masonic organizations on the 
Isthmus. Your statement that the longest 
established secret society- on the Isthmus is 
the Sojourners' Lodge, A. F. and A. M. is 
correct so far as regular lodges existing at the 
present time is concerned. Your statement, 
however, that Masonic lodges and clubs have 
been organized since 1898 at Culebra, La 
Boca, Empire, and Paraiso, is incorrect, as 
no "lodge" of Masons exists at anj-of those 
places. Two "lodges," so called of Free- 
masons exist in the city of Panama, but So- 
journers' Lodge has not received authority 
from the Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of 
Scotland, from which it holds its charter, to 
recognize such bodies as regular lodges. 
We may, of course, receive such authority, 
G. G. Dedgb. 

Edinburgh, Scotland, August 10, 



An Ohio Club. 



The Canal Record: 

It is the desire of the Ohio Club to get in 
touch with all etnployes of the Isthmian Ca- 
nal Commission and Panama railroad, whose 
homes are in Ohio. To this end I would be 
glad to have all such send me their names 
and Canal Zone address, as well as their ad- 
dress in the States. 

S. D. Roper, 

Secretary, Ohio Club. 
Gorgoua, C. Z., August 28. 



Dr. J. Pelham Bates, of Ancon Hospital, 
left with his family for New Orleans on tlie 
Patismina September 8. T(jeywill take up 
permanent residence in Nashville, Tenn,, 
where Dr. Bates has accepted a post in the 
medical department of Vanderbilt university. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



15 



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE. 

Women's Clubs and Other Features. 

Preparations are in progress for the fall 
meeting of the Canal Zone Federation of 
Women's Clubs to be held at Gorgona on 
October 1. Nearh" all the clubs along the 
line have elected their delegates, and the 
various committees are working on their re- 
ports. There will be but one session, in the 
afternoon, and that from a club point of 
view, promises to be a most interesting one. 
Reports of the delegates to the Boston bien- 
nial will be made, and the personal and 
close insight they will give into the work 
that other club women are doing will be most 
helpful. .Although it has been organized 
only a few months, the Federation promises 
to be a .strong factor during the coming 
year. 

The Ancon Woman's Club held its regular 
meeting on Wednesday, September 2. Mrs. 
C. W. Boxer presided. The report of the 
educational department through Mrs. W. T. 
Dozier, acting chairman, shows that the 
interest in the meetings is well sustained. 
The department met at Mrs. Dozier's resi- 
dence on Thursday, August 27, a large 
number being present. Readings from a 
work on early Isthmian history, music, 
and refreshments were features of the after- 
noon. The philanthropic department, un- 
der Mrs. R. W. Fenn. acting chairman, re- 
ported the new undertaking to be going on 
well. This is in connection with the night 
school for newsbo}s which is conducted by 
Mr. Ports of the Methodist church, Pan- 
ama. One member of the department pledges 
herself to work one night in the week, 
the purpose being to provide games and 
other amusements for the boys. The boj-s 
are also being taught simple .songs in Eng- 
lish. A visit to the insane ward was ar- 
ranged for this week. 

The question of the library association was 
taken up for discussion, and the club pledges 
itself to furnish SlOO toward the fund. Com- 
mittees were appointed for the purpose of per- 
sonal solicitation for names for membership. 
All the members present expressed them- 
selves greatly interested in the project, and 
every effort will be made to bring it to a suc- 
cessful issue. Nominations for officers were 
made. 

St. Luke's Episcopal Sunday School, An- 
con, held its annual excursion on Thursday, 
August 27. The part^-, which numbered 
about thirty-five, left La Boca on the Boli- 
var early in the morning for Taboga, where 
the day was spent on the beach and INIorre 
Island. The summer residence of Mr. Pee- 
bles was placed at the disposal of the picnic- 
makers for the day, and the basket lunch 
was eaten there. .A special train met the 
excursionists at La Boca and ran into Pan- 
ama in time for the 5.30train down the line. 

Archdeacon Bryan is ppending the week 
in Costa Rica, on business connected with 
his charge of that mission. Services at An- 
con chapel were conducted on Sunday by 
Rev. Edward J. Cooper, rector of Christ 
Church, Colon. 

The Culebra Woman's Club opened the 
season, on Thursday, September 3, the vice- 
president, Mrs. May Byran, presidin.g in the 
absence of the president. There was a 
small attendance, but the plans for work for 
the coming year were taken up with enthu- 
siasm and interest. The plan for the study 



of the Spanish countries will not be carried 
out, owing to the departure of the chairman 
who had the work in charge, but the club 
will take up a reading course which includes 
the .study of England, Ireland, and Scot- 
land. Books, papers, and all instructions 
regarding the course has been sent for. 
Many of the older members of the club have 
left the Isthmus, and efforts are now being 
made to interest newcomers. 

The reciprocity committee of the Zone Fed- 
eration held a meeting at the Hotel Tivoli, 
Ancon, on Monday, August 31. In the ab- 
sence of the chairman, Mrs. C. Hatison, fif 
Culebra, presided. Every effort is being made 
to make this one of the useful branches of 
federation work. Programs will be ex- 
changed or outlined, papers and entertain- 
ments from other clubs will be provided as 
called for, and calendars for use as models 
for planning the work will be forwarded. .\ 
suggestion was made that stud>- programs 
be exchanged among the clubs. Efforts will 
be made to secure the cooperation of the 
clubhouse libraries in this work. All let- 
ters of inquiry should be forwarded through 
the member of the local club representing 
the reciprocity committee. 

The Las Cascadas club met on Thursday, 
September 3, at the residence of Mrs. E. J. 
Albrecht. The retiring president, Mrs. O. (l. 
Randall, was in the chair. The resignation 
of the vice-president. Mrs. A. N. Nayler, 
was accepted, and Mrs. W. B. Green was 
elected to fill the vacancy. Mrs. W. D.Stan- 
ton, a former president, was reelected to that 
office in the place of Mrs. Randall. Dele- 
gates elected to the Federation meeting were; 
Mrs. F. W. Walraven, Mrs. W. B. Green, 
Mrs. E. J. Albrecht, and Mrs. W. D. Drys- 
dale. The regular entertainment and visit- 
ing committees for the month were elected. 
The club will meet at the home ol Mrs. 
J. E. Martin. September 10. 

Owing to the illness in the family of the 
president, Mrs. F". R. Roberts, the Pedro Mi- 
guel club suspended its regular meeting last 
week. 

The Paraiso club will resume its regular 
meeting this month. 

The Gorgona Woman's Club gave an en- 
tertainment on Friday evening, September 
4, about nineteen members, assisted by their 
friends, taking part. A parod.v on a wom- 
an's convention was .given. Music was fur- 
nished by the Gorgona orchestra. The en- 
tertainment hall of the clubhouse was filled 
to its utmost capacity. This is the first en- 
tertainment that the Gorgona club has given 
for its own benefit, and the members greatly 
appreciate the efforts of all who assisted in 
the undertaking in any way. Several musi- 
cal numbers were given during the latter 
part of the program. 

The clul.1 met on Tuesday, September S, 
for election of officers, this being an ad- 
journed session of the meeting on Thursday, 
September 3. Regular meetin,gs will be 
held on each alternate Thursday, beginning 
September 17. Although the club lias been 
virtually in recess .since the end of April, the 
summer has been a bu.sy one. The commit- 
tees appointed for the interim have \vorked 
without interruption; a large number of new 
members have been added. Called meetings 
have been frequent and well attended. Mrs. 
Guy Anient, of Texas, who has been the 
guest of her sister, Mrs. Frank Morri.son, 
leaves for her home this month. Mrs. Ainent 



is a prominent club woman at home, and 
has done much to assist in furthering the 
welfare of the club during her short stay. 

The Gorgona Dramatic Club gave its first 
performance, ".\ Fisherman's Luck," on 
Tuesday evening, September 1, at the club 
house. There was a large attendance, and 
the performance was greatly enjoyed. The 
company has been rehearsing the melodrama 
for the past month, under the direction of 
Mr. D. E. Hayes. The scenery and stage 
appointments were all that could be desired. 
At the close of the performance, the mem- 
bers of the companv were entertained at sup- 
per by Mr. and Mrs. .\rthur J. Sweet. It is 
possible that the play will be given at Empire 
later. The organization is to be a perma- 
nent one, and the members are looking for- 
ward to the preparation of new plays. .\11 
are much interested and enthusiastic about 
the work. 

Labor Da\ was celel^rated at Gorgona by a 
ball game in the morning between the mar- 
ried men and the bachelors. 

The Tivoli Lawn Tennis Club has been 
organized by residents of Ancon. Permis- 
sion has been asked to use the courts already 
laid out on the grounds of the Hotel Tivoli. 
Friday, September 11, the Culebra Sun- 
dav school will entertain all the children of 
Culebra from 4 to 7 p. m., at the Commis- 
sion chapel. Ciames wnll be played and a 
supper provided. Every boj- and girl is in- 
vited. 

Concert. 
By the I. C. C. liand at Goru.Mia, C. /.., Sunday, Sep- 
tember 13. 190S. at 6 p. m.: 

PKOGKAM. 

1 March— »'a/rf»««r Lo.sey 

2 Selection— .UoT.v Widow Lenar 

j Tone poem— .-1/1^//' Blossoms Roberts 

4 Waltz— .-l!/.i;c/'i Dream Herman 

5 Duet for Clarinets— .Va«/«f Mursal 

MESSRS. GRAY AND HALE. 

6 Selection— jl/acAinn Wallace 

7 ComicTnUao— The Musicians' Strike. ..ViihrhxiCh 
la Characteristic — Dance of the Biimbte- 

„ \ bees BaKley 

lit Schottisehe— i*'/ .Me Be Voter Lemon 

\ Coon Allen 

9 Overture — .Sunshine and Sh07uers Flath 

10 Galop— ('« Horseback Bendix 

Chas, E. jE^siTiCS, Afttsieal Director. 
A concert u-ill be jjiven at I.as Cascadas. C. Z.. 
September 20. 

Misdirected Letters. 

Division of Dead l.etters. 
Ancon, C. Z., September 9. 1908. 
The foUowinK insufficiently addressed letters, origi- 
nating in the United States and its possessions, h.ave 
been received in the olfice of the Director of Posts, 
and may be secured on request of addressee : 
.^inderson. Grant Hopkins, Wra. Robert— 6 
Darbon, Herbert Hunsicker. G, C. 
Barry. Daniel Kanachis. Xicolaos K. 
Bezara, C. A. Knight, E. I,. 
Cannichael. Chas. I.ipsie, T. E. I,. 
Darrnh, Mrs. John I.oos. Chas, H. 
Dixon, Wm. McKensie, Cyril B. 
I'.lU.son, Mrs. Laura D. Meachani. Jerome F. B. 
Fortune. Thaddesus Moore. P. H.— 2 
Francesco. Loccolani St. John. S. W. 
Gavnes, I. M. Smith. Je.ss T. 
(•,er\ais. Max Tebbs. Paul M. 
Green. William Weich. Elmer J. 
Hanff. W. B. Whitney. Mrs. G. A. 
Hennesv. Walter Wither, Miss Ruth 
Holmes. W, J. 

LEGAL NOTICE. 

United States I 

of ."America ; In the Fir.st Judicial Circuit. 
Canal Zone. ' 
George Blake, Jamaican, died intestate July 15. 
1907, lea^-iny an estate, consisting of three houses in 
Pedro Jliguel. The cl.iimauts for the estate have not 
proved that they are the le.L'itimate heirs of the dece- 
dent, and the Collector of Revenues has filed a peti- 
tion for escheat under .Sections 779-7S1 of the Code of 
Civil Procedure. 

Notice is hereby given to all concerned to appear 
at the court house in .\ucon on October 5. 190S, .at 
9 o'clock a. m.. to establish their claims to the said 
estate, or to show cause why the s.ame should not 
escheat to the Canal Zone. 

Walter Emery, 
Circuit Court Clerk. 



16 



THE CANAL RECORD 



COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT. 

COMMISSARY PRICES 

For week beeinninp September 9: 
FRESH MEATS. FOULTRV AND COLD MEATS. 

Price. 

Beef— Sirloin roast per lb 30 

Rump roast per lb 30 

Porterhouse per lb 30 

Rib-roast, short cut (not under iVi 

pounds) per lb 24 

Rib-roast, secoud cut (not under 3 

pounds) per lb 20 

Chuck-roast (not under 3 pounds) ..per lb 15 

Soup per lb 9 

Stew per lb 12 

Corned per lb.. 12. 14. 16 

Suet per lb 4 

Steaks— Sirloin per lb 30 

Porterhouse per lb 30 

Rump per lb 30 

Tenderloiti per lb 30 

Kound per lb 24 

Veal— Cutlets per lb 24 

Short-cut chops per lb 1% 

I-oin per lb 23 

Entire forequarter (15 to 20 lbs). ..per lb 11 

For stewing: per lb 11 

Mutton — Entire foreeiuarter (not under 

10 poundsl per lb 9 

Short-cut chops -^ per lb 20 

Leg (8 to 10 pounds) per lb IS 

I^imb— For stewinK per lb 10 

Entire forequarter per lb 10 

Chops per lb 30 

Leyj (6 to S pounds) per lb 28 

Pork- Cuts per lb 20 

Livers— Beef , per lb 11 

Saus:iere— Pork '. per lb 16 

Sweetbread — Veal each 1.20 

Beef per lb 25 

Ox tongues each 90 

Eges. fresh dozen 34 

Chickens— Dressed (milk-fed) each 1.40 

Virse each 1.90 

Capons each 2.40 

Fowls, medium and larce ... e.ich. $1.00 and 1.25 

Ducks, fatted (fancy) each 1.10 

Suckling pigs each 4.90 

Turkeys per lb 20 

Squabs each 45 

Bacon — Strips per lb 23 

English, breakfast, .sliced per lb §26 

Ham— Sugar-cured, sliced per lb §25 

One-half, for boiling. i per lb §20 

Westphalia per lb 45 

I'erris per lb 19 

Beef, salt, f.imily per lb 16 

Salt pork per lb 13 

DAIRY PRODUCTS. 

Buttei — Prints, prime quality per lb 33 

Cheese — Neufchatel each 6 

Young America pel lb 22 

«"''S9 per lb 33 

Uouda per lb 34 

Edam each 1.05 

Camembert per lb 28 

Mcl^aren's j.^r 15 

Pinxter's [;„ ^^ 

Buttermilk quart is 

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES. 

Grapefruit each 4 

I-^'ons dozen 18 

Oranges dozen 18 

Canteloupes each 10 

Tomatoes per ib 6 

'•^'""^"^ •- per lb 14 

Cauliflower.. per jb 20 

White potatoes per lb 31-^ 

C'-'bl'-'iE'^ per lb 4 

O'"''"^ per lb 3V2 

^°™ dozen 25 

Melons each 35 

Cucumbers per ib 7 

Sweet potatoes Per lb 2V2 

T^""iips per lb 3 

J5«e'^ per lb 3 

Carrots... p^.^ ,^ , 

Squash (summer) per lb 7 

APP'es per lb 5 

i;^'«^''es perib 15 

'^'^''^■'y b„„^^ ,,, 

§ Sold only from cold-storage and not from Com- 
missaries. 

NEW ARTICLES. 

Pi-kr. 

Button, collar. Krementz each 10 

Ties, cotton, four-in-hand each 40 

Cl»iff°n '.'yard 33 

Kimonas, silk each 3. SO 



Zephyrs, Red Seal j'ard 11 

I-"rench colienne yard 22 

Underskirts each. $1.00 and 1.60 

Flannel. Canton yard 12 

P.'iper. linen, writing package 18 

Envelopes package 8 

Paste, library. Carters. 2-oz ..bottle 5 

Shoes, boys' vici. blu pair 3.00 

Shoes, men's leather, extra high-cut pair 5.30 

Stoves, alcohol. 2-]:ole. nickel. No. 475 each 6.00 

Coolers, water. U. C. 3-galIon each 6.00 

Lifters, stove-cover each S 

Traps, rat each 10 

Handles for Enterprise sad-iron.'. e.ach 10 

Funnels, agate. No. 02 each 12 

Funnels, agate. No. 05 each 20 

Shakers, salt, pepper, china ; each 20 

Plates, dessert, china each 21 

Glasses, whisky, light each 4 

Grape Juice. Meier's, pints... bottle 35 

Baskets, market, with handles and covers. each 45 

Dishes, soap, blue and wliite each 20 

Pots, mustard, china each 15 

Bowls, finger, plain each 20 

Towels. Turkish, bleached each 50 

Ticking yard 20 

Suit ca.ses, fitted, 24-inch each 26.50 

I.etter ca.ses. leather. No. 36 each 3.75 

Shirts, full dress each 2.00 

Shirts, plaited, negligee each 1.50 

Parasols each 1.40 

Mackerel, shore per lb 8^^ 

Hangers coat each 7 

Corkscrews each 25 

Kettles, tea, agate. No. 40 each 35 

Collars, Arrow ' each 12 

Collars, Cluett each 25 

Supporters, collar pair 15 

Card cases, leather each 2 75 

Paper, writing box 10 

Hats, straw each 1.20 

Buttons, collar each. 8. 12 and IS 

.Silk zephyrs yard 50 

.Soie Ninon yard 50 

Buttons, pearl dozen 16 

Rainfall, September I to 5. ll»<>8. Inclusive 

(midnight to MIDNIGHT.) 

Maximum 

Stations. in Total, 
one day. 

AHanlic Division — 

Cristobal .84 2..30 

Brazos Brook .67 1.45 

Gatun..; .98 2.25 

nohio .59 I.IS 

Cfntral Division — 

Taheniilla 1.30 2.12 

.San P.nblo .98 2.01 

B.as Obispo .79 2.11 

Gainboa .55 1 .70 

Empire .87 2.04 

Caniacho .64 1.83 

Cnlehra .85 1.R6 

Rio Grande .70 1.55 

Pacific Division — 

Pedro Miguel .45 l.IO 

Ua Boca .42 .69 

Ancon .50 .92 

Upper Chagres. 

Alhajnela 1.34 4.00 

Tug Service Porto Bella and Nombre de 
Dios. 

Effective. Augn.st 6. 1908: The following is the 
schedule for tng service between Cristobal. Porto 
Bello and Nombre de Dios: 

Sunday: lyCave Cristobal 6.3C p. m. for Porto Bello 
only: returning same day. 

Monda.v: Leave Cristobal after Train 2 for Porto 
Bello and Nombre de Dios; returning same day. 

Tuesday: Leave Cristobal after Train 2 without 
tow. for Porto Bello only: returning, leave Porto 
Bello 2.15 p. m.. without to-.v. 

Wednesday: Leave Cristobal after Train 2 for 
Porto Bello ;iiid Nombre de Dios; returning same 
day. 

Friday: Leave Cristobal after Train 2 for Porto 
Bello and Nombre de Dios: retnniing .same day. 

Saturday: Leave Cristobal after Train 2 for Porto 
Bello only: returning, leave Porto Bello 5.30 p. m. 

The following vessels arrived at or departed from 
the rnrt of Ancon during the week ending September 
4. 1908: 

Arrivals — August 29. Ayscn. from 'Valparaiso: Au- 
gust 30. .\'r:cpoti from San Francisco: August 30. 
Santa A/ttiia. V. O. Co.. from Califoniia. 

Departures — August 25. Afapoc/in. to Valparaiso; 
August 31. Privt. to San Francisco; September 1. 
Chi/e to Valparaiso. September 2. Sanfa Maria, to 
Ollifomia. 



MOVEMENT OP OCEAN VESSELS. 



The following is a list of the sailings of the Pan- 
ama Railroad .Steamship Coinpany. of the Royal 
Mail Steam Packet Company, of the Ilambur^i- 
American Line, and of the United Fruit Company's 
I.ine, the Panama Railroad Company's dates being 
subject to change : 

FROM NEW YORK TO COLON. 

Esperanza P. R. R.Saturday Sept. 5 

Magdalena R.-M Saturday Sept. 5 

Colon P. R. R.Thursday Sept. 10 

Pr. .\ug. Wilhelm II.-A Saturday Sept. 12 

Advance P. R. R.Tuesday .Sept. 15 

Orinoco R.-M Saturday .Sept. 19 

.Mlianca '.P. R. R.Monday Sept. 21 

Finance .'. P. R. R.Saturday Sept. 26 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Saturday Sept. 26 

Panama P. R. R.Thursday Oct. 1 

Atratp R.-M .Saturday Oct. 3 

Colon P. R. R. Tuesday Oct. 6 

All the steamers of the Hamburff-American and 
Royal Mail lines call at Kingston enroute to Colon. 

FROM COLON 'ro NEW YORK. 

Alliaiica P. R. R.Wednesday.. ..Sept. 9 

Finance P. R. R.Monday Sept. 14 

Prinz Jcachim H..A Tuesday Sept. 15 

Esperanza P. R. R.Friday Sept. 18 

Atrato R.-M. ...Tuesday Sept. 22 

Colon P. R. R. Wednesday Sept. 23 

Advance P. R. R.Monday «ept. 28 

Pr. Aug. Wilhelm H.-A Tuesday Sept. 29 

AUianca P. R. U.Saturday Oct. 

Clyde R.-M. ...Tuesday Oct. 

Finance P. R. R.Thursday Oct. 

Panama P. R. R.Tuesday Oct. 

Prinz Joachim H.-.\ Tuesday Oct. 

Colon P. R. R.Monday Oct. 

Tagiis 



R.-M Tuesday Oct 

FROM NKW ORLC.\NS TO COLON. 

Ellis U.F.C.. Saturday Sept 5 

Cartago U.F.C.. Saturday Sept. 12 

Harry T. Inge U.F.C.. Saturday Sept. 19 

Ellis U.F.C.. Saturday Sept. 26 

FROM COLON TO NF-W ORLEANS. 

Ellis U.F.C.. Tuesday Sept. 15 

Cartago U.F.C.. Tuesday Sept. 22 

Harry T. Inge U.F.C.. Tuesday Sept. 29 

FROM COLON TO B.^RBADOS. CALLING AT TRINID.4D. 

Magdalena R.-M. ..Tuesday Sept. 15 

Orinoco R.-M. ..Tuesday Sept. 29 

The Panama railroad steamships sail at 3 p. m. 
from dock at Cristobal direct to New York. 

The Prinz steamers of the Hamburg- American line 
sail from Colon at 1 p. m. via Kingston. Jamaica, 
for New York. 

All Royal Mailsteainersmentionedahove leave early 
in the morning from Colon \-ia Kingston. Jamaica, 
for New York. All mail and passengers should be 
on boarti early on day of sailing. 

The steamers of the United Fruit Company's line 
sail from New Orleans at 11 a. m.. and from Colon 
at 1.. 10 p. m.. via Port Limon. for New Orleans. In 
addition to the above, the United Fruit Company 
dispatches a steamer about every ten days from 
Colon, via Bocas del Toro, for New Orleans. 

Sailings of the French line (Cie. G^n^rale Trans- 
atlantique) for Venezuelan ports. Martinique and 
Guadeloupe on the 3d and 20th of each mouth. 



Flood Stages In the Chagres. 

Maximum height of Chagres above low- 
water for the week ending midnight, Sep- 
tember 5, 1908 : 



Height of low water 
above mean sea 
level, feet 

Maximiim height ab. 
low water, feet: 
Sunday. Aug. 30.... 
Monday. Aug. 31.... 
Tuesday. Sejit. 1... 
Wedn 'sday .Sept. 2 
Thursday. Sept. 3, 

Friday. Sept. 4 

Saturday. Sept. 5. 






129 



5.25 
270 
4.45 
3.80 
3.35 
1.75 
1.60 



« 






% 


s 












a 


J= 








< 





B 


92 


46 





4.73 


4.70 


6.95 


2.S4 


3.45 


9.40 


4.04 


5.10 


8.20 


3.76 


6.05 


8.20 


3.33 


6.30 


11.10 


2.23 


4.20 


11.30 


2.00 


3.35 


7.45 



Maximum for week..| 5.25 I 4.73 I 6.30 I 11.30 I 



3.15 
2.50 
2.68 
3.60 
4.08 
2.S0 
4.08 



CANAL 




RECORD 



Volume II. 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1908. 



No. 3. 



The Canal Record 

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of the 
ISTHMIAN CANAL COMMISSION 

" Th£ Canal Record'^ is issued free oj charge, one 
copy each, to all employes of the Commission and Pan- 
ama Railroad Company 7vhose names are on the" gold'' 
roll. Extra copies can be obtained from the ne^os 
stands of the Panama Railtoad Company for Jive cents 
each 

Address all Communications 

THE CANAL RECORD 

Ancon, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama. 

No co?nmunication, either Jor publication or lequest- 
ing injoi-mation, will receive attention unless signed 
■with the J nil name and address oJ the xvriter. 



NOTES OF PROGRESS. 

Four and a-Half Million Barrels of Cement 

By circular No. 420, the Isthmian Canal 
Commission asked for bids for furnishing 
about 4,500,000 barrels of Portland cement, 
for use in the locks at Gatun, Pedro Miguel, 
and Miraflores. Of this amount, approxi- 
mately one-half -n-ill be used at Gatun, one- 
sixth at Pedro Miguel, and one-thirdat Mira- 
flores. Bids were opened on June 1. Alarge 
number of tenders were made, offering ce- 
ment of American and foreign manufacture. 
The lowest bid was that of the Atlas Port- 
land Cement Company. The prices were %\ . 19 
per barrel in wood, and .'!il.60 per barrel in 
double bags of Osnaburg duck, these prices 
being for delivery at Jersey City or Hobo- 
ken, and a rebate of 8V2 cents beingallowed 
for each bag returned in good condition. 
The company also offered to deliver at the 
works at Northampton, Pa., the cement 
packed in bags or barrels, to be furnished by 
the Commission, at 65 cents per barrel. 
Award has been authorized to the Atlas 
Portland Cement Company, reserving to the 
Commission the right to elect the method of 
delivery under certain conditions to be speci- 
fied in the contract. The delivery is to be 
at a minimum rate of 2,000 barrels and a 
maximum of 10,000 barrels per day, and 
will begin between May 1 and October 1, 
1909, upon 90 days' notice to be given by 
the Commission. 

The cement for the spillway in Gatun 
Dam will be furnished under this contract, 
but the delivery will begin December 1, 190S, 
and continue at the rate of 500 barrels per 
day, this date not affecting the date of be- 
ginning deliveries of the main amount under 
the contract. It is expected that about 
80,000 barrels will be needed for the spillway. 

Completing Obispo Diversion. 

It is the intention to have the Obispo Di- 
version, which di\'erts water from the east 
side of Culebra Cut, completed by the end of 



the next dry season. The last big cut that 
will allow the water to enter the ravine lead- 
ing to the Chagres River, is about three- 
quarters of a mile east of Haut Obispo, and 
will require an excavation of over 300,000 
cubic yards. It is one of the most difficult 
pieces of work that an^- one of the construc- 
tion superintendents of the Central Division 
has yet encountered. The most practical 
and economical way of removing the mate- 
rial will be decided in a few days. It is not 
the amount of excavation that makes the 
problem interesting so much as the steep 
grade and sharp curvature encountered in 
getting trains up to the site. It may be 
necessary to do no small amount of hand 
work before the steam shovels can begin ex- 
cavating. 

Naos Island Breakwater. 

In connection with the breakwater from 
East Iva Boca to Naos Island, at the Pacific 
entrance to the Canal, now in process of con- 
struction, it is interesting to record that a 
similar structure was provided for in the 
concessionary contract between the United 
States of Coloml ia and the Panama Railway 
Company made in 1S67. Article 4 of that 
contract reads as follows: 

The Comp.nny binds itself to extend the railroad on 
the Pacific side to the islands of Naos. Culebra. Perico 
and Flamingo, or other places in the bay where there 
may e.^ist a permanent depth of water for largre 
vessels. 

In 18S0 a new contract was formed by 
which the Panama Railway Compan3' agreed 
to pay to the United States of Colombia the 
sum of .$10,000 a year for a period of thirty 
years as a penalty for not extendingthe road 
to the islands in the Pacific. In other words, 
the company agreed to pay ,*i300,000 for the 
abrogation of this contract durin,g 30 years, 
at the expiration of which period the orignal 
contract was to be again in force. The 
penalty of $10,000 a year «-as paid for 20 
years or until 1900. In that )-ear the Pan- 
ama Railway Company, acting through 
Senor Don Jose Augastin Arango, as special 
representative, effected a new settlement 
with the Colombian Government, in accord- 
ance with which the original contract was 
abrogated foralltimein consideration of the 
payment by the company of an additional 
sum of $200,000, making the total amount 
which the compan3- had paid for the non- 
completion of the railway to the islands in 
the Pacific pOO,000. 



Quartermaster's and Subsistence Depart- 
xnen s. 

The clerical force of the old Division of 
Material and Supplies has been distributed 
among the ofiices of the Quartermaster's 
Department, the majoritv of the men being 
transferred to the office of the Chief Quarter- 
master in Culebra. The Culebra office will 
be maintained in the wing of the Adminis- 
tration building, formerly occupied b_v the 



Department of I^abor, Quarters and Sub- 
sistence. 

The headquarters of the Subsistence De- 
partment were moved to Cristobal on Sep- 
tember 15, and were established in the De 
Lesseps house, formerly occupied as offices 
by the Division of Material and Supplies. 

Rain Int< rferes -with S earn Shovels, 

The steady downfall of rain at Culebra, 
September 12 and 13, caused some delay in 
the work in the Culebra Cut. Between noon 
on September 12, and noon September 14, 
4 93-100 inches of rain fell. At Cucaracha 
slide the loose dirt was washed down into 
the Cut until it overflowed the construction 
tracks and buried the trucks of three steam 
shovels. Men were immediately set at work 
excavating the shovels, and, barring further 
heavy rains, they will resume work on Sep- 
tember 16, or the day following. 
Storage iuagazines. 

The final location for the 600,000-pound 
dynamite magazine about two miles up the 
Chagres River on the right bank, has been 
approved and over a mile of track leading to 
it is now completed. Work is being pushed 
rapidly to complete the track, so that the 
construction of the big magazine may be 
started by the middle of October. A maga- 
zine of like capacity is almost completed at 
Hindi, and work on the Cocoli magazine is 
making good progress. Theopeningof these 
magazines will relieve the situation in taking 
care of the great amount of dynamite which 
is being shipped to the Isthmus to aid in the 
excavation work. 



A Dump at Santa Cruz. 

A dump ground capable of holding 3,000, - 
000 cubic jards of spoil has been located 
north of Santa Cruz on the new line of the 
Panama railroad. It has the triple advan- 
tage of being a short haul from Culebra 
Cut, of aidiii.g the Panama railroad in making 
a cut-off from the line as at present relocated, 
and relieving the main line of many of the 
the trains hauling material to the big dump 
at Tabernilla. Several Central Division 
engineers, the superintendent of transpor- 
tation, and one of the superintendents of 
construction went over the ground last 
week. The windings of the Chagres River 
form a peninsula at Santa Cruz, known as 
Point 1, and another at Matachin known as 
Point 2. In going around Point 2, the re- 
located line makes almost a semi-circle and 
then cuts across Point 1, onto the new 
Garaboa brid,ge. At this point the new line 
is built on trestles in several places, the total 
length of high trestles being over a mile. 
These trestles will be strengthened b^- some 
additional bracing to make them perfectlj' 
safe for dumping, and the wasting of spoil 
over them will then begin. 

Meanwhile excavation at Matachin penin- 
sula. Point 2, is making rapid progress and 
as soon as the part of the work that is to be 



18 



THE CANAL RECORD 



NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



{Continued) 



done by steam shovels is completed, the 
Chagres will be turned through the new- 
channel . This will leave all that part of 
the peninsula, around which the relocated 
line of the railroad runs, outside the course 
of the river. A cut-off line will then be 
built from a point about 1.000 feet north of 
Gamboa Bridge to connect \nth the long 
trestle on the other side of Point 2, forming 
a chord of what has been referred to as a 
semi-circle. The cut-off line will run over 
a trestle bridge, and as soon as the bridge 
is completed, dumping to make a fill will 
be begun. The trestle dump will bewidened 
out making a regular dump ground. This 
plan for improving the alignment of the re- 
located railroad, relieving the main line of 
some of its traffic, and opening a short-haul 
dump for trains from the prism between 
Las Cascadas and Bas Obispo, was made by 
the old Chagres Division before the re- 
organization. 

A Month's Work in the Shops. 

August was a typical month in the shops 
on the Isthmus, and the returns from the 
plants at Gorgona and Empire give a fair 
idea of the amount and kind of work done. 

At Gorgona the manufacturing work in- 
cluded the retubing of the boiler for the 
pumping station at Gatun. the construction 
of a track shifter, of one 5-ton derrick, -one 
unloader - plow, three wings for spreaders, 
and structural iron for the jail at Porto Bello, 
the lodge hall at Las Cascadas, and the pow- 
der magazine at Cucaracha. Repairs were 
made on 27 locomotives, and on 2,099 wooden 
fiat cars, most of the wood-car repairing be- 
ing done at this shop. In the wood shop, 
236,774 feet of lumber were ripped and 
dressed. The cost of labor was .'*;7S,676.94, 
and of material ;^75,452.10. In the iron 
foundry 385,235 pounds of iron castings 
were turned out, with a labor cost of ;i8,- 
600.29, and an expenditure for material' of 
)J4.548.17. The brass foundry turned out 
38,171 pounds of brass castings at a labor 
cost of $1,386.42, and an expenditure for 
material of $5,444.32. In the shop the cost 
for labor for manufacturing was ,?11,909.30, 
and for material $18,578.86. The remainder 
of the labor and material accounts is charged 
against repairing. 

General repairs are made at the Empire 
shops to steam shovels, and to the greater 
number of steel cars, although a large amount 
of manufacturing and other repairing is also 
done there. General repairs were made on 
13 steam shovels, and the installation of a 
400-k. w. unit in the electric light plant was 
begun. The cost of labor at Empire was 
§81,053.07, and of material $46,248.05. 



Keeping Public Order. 

The August report of the Chief of Police 
shows that 488 people, representing forty- 
three countries, were arrested in the Canal 
Zone during that month. Seventy-five 
cases were tried in the courts, 15 of which 
were dismissed, 37 continued, and 23 in 
which convictions were procured. Of the 
23 persons convicted, 11 were sentenced to 
the penitentiarj-, 3 to the common jail, and 
9 to pay a fine. Seven of the penitentiary 
prisoners are serving sentences of a year, 3 
sentences of 6 months, and 1 a sentence of 
3 months, all at hard labor. Seven pris- 



oners were discharged from the peniten- LETTERS FROM THE LINE. 

tiary, The prisoners in the penitentiarv 

performed work valued at $698.15, while ■*■" *^P^" Letter. 

those at th- Gatun convict cimp, who are '''"'• <^'^'''"- Ri'^okd: 

working on the highwav from Gatun to To flie Former Employes of t/w Building 

Mount Hope, performed service valued at <-0>nlri(dw)i Division: As my connection 

$1,125.10. The number of prisoners in the ^'''■'' ""^ Build.ng Construction Division 

penitentiarv on .\u,rust 31 was 115. '^'os'^^ to-day, after three years of active serv- 

Compared with June and Julv, there was ^"^^ '^^ •^'^^'^ °^ "^'^ division, and as the busi- 

a decided decrease in the number of arrests "'^■'^'^ "es that have bound us together during 

during August, the number during June ''^'^ P*^""'^ ^"'^ about to be severed, I desire, 

having been 573, and during Julv 536. No "irough the columns of the The Canal 

cases of homicide or manslaughter occurred Record, to express to you, each one and all, 

during August. A number'of petty bur- ™>' tliauks for the uniform courtesy and re- 

glaries occurred, and the leader of the gang ^P'^^^ "''"^ '^■'"'^'' >'°" ^^'^'^ treated me at all 

of burglars is now in custodv. Six men times. 

were deported -two to Spiin, and one each ^othe former superintendents and .general 

to Barbados, Chile and the United States. foremen on the work, I wi.sh particularly to 

There were 10 violent deaths requiring thank you for your promptness and effi- 

action by the coroner, 4 of which were due "^"'^y i" ca^ying out any orders or instruc- 

to drowning, 2 to railroad accidents, 1 to ''°"S ^ ^^^^'^^ g'^'*^"- ^he most of my life 

suicide, and 3 to accidental injuries. ^^^ been spent m associations and dealings 

with men of the class to which, I am proud 

^, ^ ^ ,,,,,' „ . , to sav, vou and I belong, and our service 

The first order for 40-ton flat cars given bv » .'i 'i i, -^11 .. 1 

, , . _ , ^ . . , ° .- together has been uniformly pleasant and 

the Isthmian Canal Commission for use in ,• , ,. 

X, r. 1 1 ..11-^,^ satisfactorv. 

the Canal work was, as stated m The C.\NAr, 1^ .t "1 ■ 1 1 a t t • u* 

„ /• ^ X t „ , „„„ .„, . To the clerical and office forces I wish to 

Record of September 9, for 800 cars. This . , ,■.■ » ^i . • 1. .. 

, . ,, , sav, in addition to the above, m whatever 

number, however, does not comprise all the .'■ ,.■ ■ ^■l ■, u • 

,„ _ V . , ,^ , station or position m life vou or I niav be m 

40-ton flat cars in use on the work, as enough , . ,1 i ' -ii. 1 ' .. 

. , , . ., ^ , ^ future, I can alwavs refer with pleasure to 

have lieen added since the first order was .. , , " , .. ^ n 

, , • X, X . , , , -,-,„ the davs and vears we have spent together 

given to bring the total number up to 1,778. x, 't.-i ' 

on the Istlinius 

The present car equipment of the Isthmian ^ • t .1 1 1 ■ 1 1 „ 

„ ', , ..'',.,, . , , Again, I thank vou and wish you as large 

Canal Commission, which does not include , ' • /, .^ ' , 

, „ T, ., , ^ . , ,, a measure of success as vou lustlv merit and 

the Panama Railroad Company, is as follows: , , . , . ' j »' , 

■^ ^ godspeed m whatever vou undertake. 

Fortv-ton flats 1.77S iTT-ii u ■ -u t ' 11 t 

Fiftvton steel flats 500 With best wnshes for all. lam. 

Western dumps 599 W. M. BELDING. 

Oliver dumps 500 Master Builder. 

lugoidsby dumps 12 Culebra, September 9, 1908. 

Goodwiu dumps 12 

Total "1401 Army and Navy Smoker. 

The hard usage that this equipment re- The Canal Record: 

ceives on the Isthmus is shown bv the fact ^he Gen. Henry W. Lawtoii Garrison, 

that in August 6.250 40-ton flat cars were re- ^'°- ^^' ^"'1 ^'^^ ^"■' S- Sturtevant Garrison, 

paired in the shops, an average of 31/0 trips >^'°- -^l- °^ ^^^^ Regular Army and Navy Union 

to the shop for each car. Of the 500 50-ton °^ "^^ U. S. A., will hold a smoker at the 

steel flat cars, 105 were repaired during the Imperial Hotel, Colon, Saturday, October 3, 

month. Repairs were also made in the 1908, at 8.30 p. m. 

shops to 2,011 Western dump cars, 1,194 ^ ""ea' "Army" meal will be served. 

Oliver dump cars, 22 Ingoldsbv cars, and 11 'Good speakers, singers, musicians and elo- 

Goodwin cars. The cost of shop repairs to cutionists will be present, and a good time 

cars in August was $49,797.22. '^ therefore prom.sed. It is the desire of 

Repairs amounting to $1,011.85 were made ''"^ organization to extend an invitation to 
on the nine track shiftersowned bvtheCom- ^11 ex-soldiers, sailors, and mannas on the 
mission, $666.73 on the 35 cranes, $302.47 on Istlimus (who have served in the regulars) 
the 18 pile drivers, and ,$331.18 on the labor ^ be with us on this occasion, and m order 
cars. The Commission also owns 30 unload- that no one maybe slighted, and that we 
ers, repairs to which in August amounted to "^^y become better acquainted, it is requested 
$6,006.31, and 23 spreaders, which were re- ^hat "all hands" send their names and ad- 
paired at a cost of $3,567.53. fl'-esses to William M. Ridpath, adjutant, 

Seventeen steam shovels were in the .shops Cristobal, C. Z., who will immediately .or- 

for general repairs at a cost of $28,815.05. ""^^d invitations. 

This does not take into account the repairs ^^ry respectfully, 

made in the field. The steam shovels owned ^- C. BRADFORD, 

• ■ J- -J J /: 1, Commander ,\o. 40, 

by the Commission are divided as follows: Cristobal, September 10, 1908. 

Fortv-five-ton Bucyrus 10 

.Seventv-toii ^>uc^■rus 35 ^ „, , _, 

Ninety-five ton Bucyrus 32 Steam Shovel Men. 

Model 20, Miiri n 1 ^jj members of the International Brother- 
Model 60. Mariou ' . 1 r rA, f., 1 1 T-, 1 TXT 

Model 91, Marion 16 hood of Steam Shovel and Dredge Men are 

~~~ requested to attend a meeting to be held in 

ThTcost'of'repairs to '44 locomotives' was the clubrooms at Bas Obispo, at 2 o'clock 

$34,909.55. of which $10,498.37 was for run- Sunday afternoon, Septeniber 20^ 

ning repairs. The locomotive equipment G. G. M cNamara. 

consists of the following: ^ouis Mickle died at Colon hospital Sep- 

DpcauvilVeV. v. v. v. v. v. '.v.. v. '.'.'.'.'.''.'.'.'.'.'.'!! !!'.'.!!" ^^9 tember 8, from appendicitis. He was born 

Two-lnindred class 100 ju New York .state 37 years ago, and had 

Three-hundred class 40 . ^i t ^l o ' 10 ^«*i.c- 

six hundred class 20 been on the Isthmus 2 years and 9 months, 

Thirty-six-iucli gauge ^ 4 his place of residence being house No. 292, 

Total 297 Cristobal. His wife survives him. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



19 



PERFORMANCE OF STEAM SHOVELS 



MONTHLY RECORDS IN THE .\TLANTIC, CENTRAL,, AND PACIFIC DIVISIONS 
The subjoined tables show the monthly records of steam shovel W3rk in Canil excivations since American occupation 



ATLANTIC DIVISION 



COLON DISTRICT 







a 




_ 














Period. 




35 


h 

G 
1- — 




a 

c 






























^ .„ 






^ 








3 • 


3 ■ 






c a 


Sri 


C.3 


c 




> "1 












< 


2; 


o 


5 


OS 


1907— 








^ 




Julv 


1 

2 


13 
27 


56 
283 


731 
7.629 


11.12 


August 


16.37 


September.. 


2 


24 


601 


14.419 


8.03 


October 


2 


-27 


761 


20.539 


19.27 


November.. 


2 


24 


833 


20.002 


14.27 


December 


2 


25 


939 


23.473 


5.53 


1903— 












January 


2 


26 


1.218 


31.418 


3.18 


February 


2 


24 


1.368 


32.S16 


1.29 




2 

2 
2 


26 
25 
25 


1,574 
1,349 
1,087 


40.925 
33.718 
27.167 


2.81 




1.47 


May 


17.30 




1.8 
1.54 


26 
26 


684 

587 


17.790 
15.269 


13.33 


Julv 


13.67 


August 


15.88 



GATUN LOCKS. 





<*. 


c 


^ 


^ 






o 












1! 


S5 
a 




reriod 


= % 


>- s 


<u^ 


o;" 


a 






























^ „ 


.W >) 














3 . 






























> « 








a 




< 


z 


o 


o 


CA 


1907— 












August 


3.70 
4.12 


27 
24 


784 
884 


21.176 
21.219 


16.37 


September 


8.03 


October 


5.00 


27 


1.013 


27,.VS5 


19.27 


November 


5.00 


24 


1,014 


24.327 


14.27 


December 


5.00 


25 


1,286 


32,159 


5.53 


190S— 












January.. 


5.72 


26 


1.302 


33.840 


3.1S 


Februarj- 


6.01 


24 


1.222 


29.333 


1.29 




7.00 
7.00 


26 
25 


1.206 
1.288 


31.366 
32.210 


2.81 


April 


1.47 


May 


5.76 


25 


1.156 


28.891 


17.30 


June 


4.88 


26 


1.129 


29.364 


13.33 


July 


3.77 


26 


1.396 


36.291 


13.67 




3.50 


26 


1,431 


37,218 


15.88 







GATUN 


SPILLWAY. 










bl 












<u >^ 








11 


3,d 
^ 2 




ss 

a 




Period. 


i 7i 


li'~^. 


4J" 


a 


















*..n 










^2 


fS 


3 = 


0.3 


^ 




























< 


z 


o 


o 


OS 


1907— 












Julv 


1.33 


26 


423 


10.998 


11.12 




2.00 


27 


498 


■ 13.433 
18.158 


16 37 


September 


2.00 


24 


757 


8.03 


October 


2.00 


27 


745 


20.118 


19.27 


November 


2.00 


24 


854 


20.494 


14.27 


December 


2.00 


25 


1,395 


34,878 


5.53 


1908— 












January 


3.00 


26 


1,264 


32,863 


3.18 


February 


3.75 


24 


1.183 


28.402 


1.29 


March 


4.54 


26 


1,311 


34.149 


2.81 


April 


5.00 


25 


1 184 


29 598 


1 47 


May 


4.42 


25 


908 


22.701 


17.30 


June 


3.50 


26 


1,117 


29,045 


13.33 


July 


3.00 


26 


981 


25,514 


13.67 


August 


2.85 


26 


783 


20,351 


15.88 



CENTRAL DIVISION 



CULEBRA SECTION 



■ 


Average number of 
shovels at work. 


bt 

n 

^ 2 

^ 


Output per shovel 
(cubic yards). 


Rainfall 
(inches) . 


PI 


Period. 


! 


a 




g 

3 
U 


Maximum tern 
ture in sun at 
pi re (degrees 
renheit). 


woe- 


12.83 
12.48 
12.37 
12.33 
12.41 
14.81 
16.64 
16.93 
21.33 
22.67 
20.46 
22.68 

31.04 
39.87 
43.88 
44.12 
31.70 
38.28 
43.38 
39.70 
38.50 
37.63 
41.88 
42.72 

43.42 
43.67 
42.19 
41.28 
41.56 
42.92 
52.57 
52.58 


26 
23 
27 
24 
27 
26 
25 
27 
24 
27 
24 
25 

26 
23 
25 
26 
26 
25 
26 
27 
24 
27 
24 
25 

26 
24 
26 
25 
25 
26 
26 
26 


363 
587 
716 
720 
581 
539 
378 
536 
568 
532 
459 
491 

702 
674 
741 
765 
833 
651 
680 
729 
811 
813 
■784 
965 

1,084 
1.186 
1.171 
1,202 
918 
1,011 
1,071 
1,122 


9,430 
13.494 
19.335 
17.289 
15.684 
14.026 

9.441 
14.461 
13.664 
14.373 
10,833 
12,267 

18.248 
15.966 
18.530 
19,884 
21,674 
16,266 
17,670 
19,680 
19.468 
21,963 
18,818 
24.113 

28.177 
28.475 
30.451 
30.031 
22.948 
26.281 
27.848 
29.184 


1.2S 
0.57 
0.45 

11.42 
7.54 
6.92 

14.61 

11.84 
7.41 
3.97 

21.05 
8.15 

0.08 
0.13 
0.16 
0.09 
6.22 
13.53 
9.85 
11.28 
10.86 
15.44 
10.40 
1.47 

0.75 
0.00 
0.41 
1.36 

12.91 
8.21 

11.79 
8.11 


1.19 
0.64 
1.34 
8.43 
7.25 
8.94 
20.26 
12.97 
6.22 
8.46 
19.19 
9.09 

0.00 
0.49 
0.08 
0.04 
7.45 
14.74 
9.42 
11.81 
11.38 
15.27 
6.91 
2.30 

0.91 
0.01 
0.13 
1.67 

12.63 
8.76 

13.23 
7.74 












April 





May 





June 


123 


Julv 


127 


August 


132 




130 




128 




120 


December 


108 


1907— 
January 


104 




108 




105 


April 


110 


May 


118 




118 


July 


118 




120 


September 


123 


October .. 


123 


November 


123 




124 


190S— 


125 




124 


March 


125 


April 


127 


May 


129 




126 


July Cold Chagres Division included).. 
August do do 


121 



CHAGRES SECTION 





«— 




^ 


. 
















Period. 


^ 3 


11 


1! 


in HI 

a 

u 


1 
u 

s 
















aj~ 


*-.S 


•o 










^ .„ 










Bo 




a?. 


3 ■ 










3^ 




c 




< 


Z 


c 


5 


M 


1907— 












August 


0.15 


27 


716 


19.333 


12.20 


September 


0.92 


24 


976 


23.420 


14.71 


October 


2.22 


27 


428 


11.544 


13.62 


November 


3.00 


24 


612 


14.681 


9.85 


December 


6.12 


25 


630 


15,756 


2.26 


190S— 












January 


8.11 


26 


797 


20,720 


0.20 


February 


10.33 


24 


798 


19.144 


0.11 


March 


11.47 
11.76 


26 
25 


1.082 
1.121 


28.094 
28.018 


0.41 


April 


1.81 


May 


11.68 


25 


808 


20.197 


13.18 


June 


12.23 


26 


1 013 


26 341 


6 55 


*July 













♦After July 1, 1908. the old Chagresand Culebra divi- 
sions were consolidated in the Central Division, No 
separate record for steam shovels in tlie old divisions 
has been kept since that date. Figures for July and 
August under "Culebra Section" include work done 
in the whole Central Division. 



Summary for the month of July, 1908: 
Average number of shovels at work, 66.68. 
Average output per shovel per day, 887 cubic vards. 
Average output per shovel per month. 23.033. 
The working day for steam shovels is eight hours. 



PACIFIC DIVISION 



PEDRO MIGUEIv I,OCKS 





<« 


u 




















II 


?5 

S 

t = 


0. 




,a 




5^ 


4; . 


'■■7 


a 
















«,- 




•o 








us; 

l/,3 




U 


hi 


«2 












a 




< 


2 


o 


o 


« 


190S- 














0.50 


26 


600 


19,134 


4.98 


Jnlv 


1.00 
1.00 


26 
26 


626 
816 


16.282 
21,203 


9.53 


AUiTUSL 


9.31 



MIRAFLORES LOCKS. DAMS AND 


SPILLWAY 






ba 


^ 


















-1 


%i 


II 




tn 


Period 


S2 






o 




£ o 




\2 




1 


















z 


3^ 

o 


6 


§. 


1908- 












March.. 


3.50 
4.50 
5.75 
3.S0 
3.80 
3.70 


26 
25 
25 
26 
26 
26 


746 
620 
487 
695 
930 
947 


19.418 
20.502 
12.174 
18.077 
24.179 
24,612 


0.00 


April 


0.76 




8.65 




4.98 


July 


5.66 


August 


9.31 



LA BOCA DISTRICT 





o 


b« 


"C >^ 


•C 6 




Peried. 


11 




1! 


a « 


a 




tjS. 




-a 




















E2 

4/ .3 


* " 
E& 


Bf. 


Is 


3 












a 




•>! 


Z 


o 


5 


X 


isos— 












March 


1.00 


26 


476 


12,360 


0.00 


April 


1.00 


25 


452 


11.300 


0.76 




1.00 


25 


688 


17.200 


8.65 




1.00 
1.00 
0.92 


26 
26 
26 


562 
623 
739 


14.630 
16.200 
19,214 


4 97 




5.66 


August 


10 .4S 



20 



THE CANAL RECORD 



EMPLOYES INJURED ON ISTHMUS. 

Decision of Comptroller of the Treasury in 
Rt-ft-renee to Their Compensatioii. 

It is held by the Comptroller of the United 
States Treasury that by the Act of Concrress, 
effective August 1. 1908, all Isthmian Canal 
Commission regtilations, providing for al- 
lowance of injury or meritorious sick leave, 
are revoked. 

This Act grants to certain employes in- 
jured in the performance of their duties 
compensation as long as disabled, not ex- 
ceeding one year, provided they are dis- 
abled for more than fifteen working days; 
and prohibits the payment for injury leave 
to employes who are disabled fifteen work- 
ing days or less, or who do not come under 
the Act. 

Injured employes, disabled for more than 
fifteen working days, in order to obtain pay- 
ment for the period of absence from duty, 
must submit a claim for compensation to the 
Department of Commerce and Labor at 
Washington, D. C. This claim for compen- 
sation will be prepared for them by the 
Claim Officer, Admistration Building, Cule- 
bra. 

Injured employes who have lost fifteen 
working days should call on the Claim Offi- 
cer at Culebra, and surgeons by whom the}- 
are treated will furnish railroad transporta- 
tion for that purpose. If they are not able 
to travel to Culebra they should notify the 
Claim Officer of that fact in writing, show- 
ing the name of the hospital in which they 
are being treated, and the Claim Officer will 
call on them for the purpose of preparing 
their claim for compensation. 

It must be understood that absolutel}' no 
payment can be made for time lost on ac- 
count of injuries until authorization is re- 
ceived from the Department of Commerce 
and Labor, Washington, D. C. 

Geo. W. Goethals, 

Chaitfiian and Chitf Engineer. 

Treasury Department, 
Washington, D. C, Sept. /, 190S. 
To THE Chairman of the Isthmian Ca- 
nal Commission: 

Sir — I am in receipt of j-our letter of the 
20th ultimo, in which you request my ad- 
vance decision of the questions therein sub- 
mitted. It reads: 

"I have the honor to request jour decision upon the 
questions herein stated, as to the leg:ality of pay- 
ment by the Commission of compensation to its em- 
ployes in certain cases during the time they are un- 
able to work on account of injury incurred in the 
performance of duty. 

"The regiilations adopted at the 129th meeting of 
the Commission held June 11, 1907, which reg-ula- 
tions became effective July 1, 1907, pro\'ide as to em- 
ployes other than laborers as follows: 

" 'An employe may be granted, in the discretion of 
the head of the department in which employed, with 
the approval of the Chairman, leave on account of 
injury incurred in the performance of duty, not ex- 
ceeding thirty da.\s in any current year, while such 
employe is incapacitiited from duty by reason of such 
injury. The amount of compensation to be paid an 
employe to whom leave is granted on account of in- 
juo" ^vill he calculated as provided for in case of sick 
leave. t,eave on account of injury may be granted 
to an employe in addition to the sick leave above 
provided. I^eave on account of injury shall not 
be cumulative, and payment for same will be made 
on the first pay-roll following its authorization. All 
employes, in case of illness or injury, will receive 
free medical care and attendance at the hospitals.' 

"The same regulations provide, as to all laborers 
on the Isthmus as follows: 

" 'Laborers may be granted, in the discretion of the 
head of the department in which employed, with the 
approval of the Chairman, leave on account of injury 
incurred in the performance of duty, not exceeding 



thirty days in any current year, while incapacitated 
for duty by reason of such injury. The a^nount of 
compensation in such cases shall be calculated on the 
basis of an eight-hour day. In case of illness or ir- 
jnry, laborers shall receive free medical care and 
attendance at the hospitals.' 

"Attention is also in\-ited to the Act of Congress 
approved May 30, 190S (35 Stat., ^56) . granting to cer- 
tain classes of employes of the United States compen- 
sation for injuries sustained in the course of their 
employment. Sections I. 7 and S of that Act pro\'ide: 

"'That when, on or after August first, nineteen 
hundred and eight, any person employed by tlie Uni- 
ted States as an artisan or laborer in any of its man- 
ufacturing establishments, arsenals, or navy-yards or 
in the construction of river and harbor or fortification 
work, or in hazardous employment on construction 
work in the reclamation of arid lands, or the manage- 
ment and control of the same, or in hazardous em- 
ployment under the Isthmian Canal Commission, is in- 
jured in the course of such employment, such employe 
shall be entitled to receive for one year thereafter, 
unless such employe, in the opinion of the Secretary' 
of Commerce and I,abor. be sooner able to resume 
work, the same pay as if he continued to be employed, 
such payment to be made under such regulations as 
the Secretary of Commerce and I^abor may pre- 
scribe: Provided, That no compensation shall be paid 
under this Act where the injnr>' is due to the negli- 
gence or misconduct of the employe injured, nor 
unless such injury shall continue fjr more than fif- 
teen days. All questions of negligence or miscon- 
duct shall be determined by the Secretary of Com- 
merce and Labor. 

"'Sec. 7. That the United States shall not exempt 
itself from liability under this Act by any contract, 
agreement, nile. or regulation, and any such con- 
tract, agreement, rule, or regulation shall be pro 
tanto void. 

" 'Sec. 8. That all Acts or parts of Acts in conflict 
herewith or providing a diflferent scale of compensa- 
tion or otherwise regulating its payment are hereby 
repealed.' 

"There may be some question whether a particular 
employe, or class of employes, of the Commission 
are within the terms of this act of Congress and en- 
tilled to its benefits. Without discussing that ques- 
tion, it is to be noticed that the Act does not cover 
any case of injury under any circumstances unless 
the injury continue for more than fifteen days; that 
Section 7 makes void pro tanto any contract, agree- 
ment, rule, or regulation that exempts the United 
States from liability under this Act : and that Section 
8 is but an affirmative statement of the effect this 
Act has upon prior conflicting Acts or parts of Acts. 

" The Act being a beneficial one it has not seemed 
to me that it was intended to take away from an em- 
ploye any contract right which he had to payment 
for time lost through injury incurred in the per- 
formance of duty ; and therefore, that an employe 
who would be entitled to the benefits of the Act if his 
injury lasted more than fifteen days is also entitled 
to receive the benefits conferred upon him by his 
contract or the regulations of the Commission for 
the period of injury if it continue for only fifteen 
days or less; in other words, an employe coming 
within the terms of the Act would receive, under the 
Act, pay if the injury lasted sixteen da\s or more; 
while, if it lasted but fifteen days or less, he would 
be entitled to pay under the terms of his contract 
with the Commission. 

"This view of the meaning of the law would not 
place such an employe in a worse position as to an 
injury lasting fifteen days or less than he was before 
the passiige of the Act, nor in a worse position as to 
compensation for such injury than that occupied by 
the employes of the Commission who are not en- 
titled to the benefits of the Act. ~1. 

" It is also to be noticed that the Act provides that 
no compensation shall be paid under it where the in- 
jury is due to the negligence or misconduct of the 
employe injured, while the regulations of the Com- 
mission and its contracts of employment contain no 
such restrictions. 

" Your decision is requested upon tlie following 
questions : 

"1. Is the Isthmian Canal Commission authorized 
to pay to an employe who is entitled to the bene- 
fits of the Act of May 30, 190S, the cnmpens;ition pro- 
Wded in his contract or the regulations of the Com- 
mission during the time he is incapacitated for work 
on account of injury incurred in the performance of 
duty, if the period for which he is so incapacitated is 
fifteen days or less ? 

"2. Is the Commission authorized to pay to an 
employe who is entitled to the benefits of the Act but 
is injured Ihrougli his own necligence or miscon- 
duct, the coinpens ition provided in his contract or 
the regulations of the Commission for the time he is 
incapacitated on account of the injury, whether the 
duration be more or less than fifteen days? 

"3. Does the Act affect in any way the payment 



of compensation for injury leave to those classes of 
officers and employes of the Commission who are 
not entitled to the benefits of the Act of May 30. 1908? 
■ There are many injury cases now arising. In 
order that cases now pending and others may be 
speedily disposed of and the euiplojes receive such 
pay as is due. it is requested that your decision be 
rendered at the earliest possible date, and that it be 
sent to the Washington ofllice of the Commission, so 
that vour conclusions may be cabled to me." 
THE DECISION. 

In the absence of Congressional enacttnent, 
the regulations of the Commission set out 
in 3-our letter providing for leave with pay 
for thirty days or a fractional part thereof to 
emplo^'es of the Coitimission for injuries 
incurred in the line of duty; and thirty days 
leave or fractional part thereof with pay to 
laborers of the Commission for injuries in- 
curred while in the performance of duty 
and while incapacitated for duty by reason 
of such injury not exceeding thirty days, 
were undoubtedly made with authority at 
the time they were made, considering the 
broad authority granted the President by 
the provisions of the original Spooner Act 
authorizing him to construct the Canal. 

But when Congress stepped in and 
enacted, as it did, the Act of May 30, 1908 
(35 Stat., 556), set out in your letter, provid- 
ing just what kind of relief for personal in- 
juries and exactly to whom and under what 
circumstances it should be given and included 
the emploj-es of the Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission in such Act, I am forced to the con- 
clusion that this enactment is exclusive, 
after it came into effect, and that it is no 
longer in the power of the Commission by 
regulations, past or present, to enlarge or 
diminish the provisions of that Act as to the 
relief extended to employes of this Commis- 
sion for injuries received in the line of their 
said etnployment. 

A different holding would be an attempt 
to broaden and modify an Act of Congress, 
and to make a discrimination in favor of a 
class, where Congress legislating concern- 
ing such class did not see fit to make such 
discrimination. 

Congress has declared in unequivocal 
language that certain employes of the Canal 
Commission (and I think a broad and liberal 
construction should be given to the words 
definingthe class embraced therein) injured 
in the course of their employment, shall be 
entitled to receive for one year thereafter, 
unless in the opinion of the Secretary of 
Commerce and Labor they shall be sooner 
able to resume work, the same pay as if they 
continued at work during such time, pro- 
vided such compensation shall not be paid 
unless such injury is without the negligence 
or misconduct of such emplo3'e so injured, 
nor unless such injury shall continue for 
more than fifteen days, and that all questions 
of negligence or misconduct shall be deter- 
mined by the Secretary of Commerce and 
Labor, it may be possible that Congress 
should have made an exception in favor of 
tne employes of your Commission and 
granted them pay for less than fifteen days 
of injuries in line of duty, or when injured 
through their own fault or negligence, but 
it did not make such discrimination, but 
placed them on the same level with the 
artisans and laborers of other branches of 
the service engaged in hazardous under- 
takings. 

If Congress made a mistake in this I can 
not correct its errors of omission by con- 
struction or interpretation. In my judg- 



THE CANAL RECORD 



21 



ment this Act of Congress suspended and 
made null all regulations giving to employes 
of the Government engaj^ed in the service 
of the Canal Commission or elsewhere, other 
or different relief from that granted for 
injuries while in the line of dut_v. The 
regulations quoted by you do both and are, 
therefore, of no legal force or effect. 

Entertaining the views I entertain as to 
the force and effect of the Act of Congress 
supra, I am constrained to answer your first 
two questions in the negative and your third 
in the afBrniative. 

Yours respectfully, 

R. J. Tracewell, 

Compiroller. 



Com:iiissl>in Action. 

At a meeting^ of the Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission at Culebra on September 5, 1908. 
the following resolutions were adopted : 

PAY OF ARMY. NAVY AND OTHER OFFICERS. 

Re solved, TYvxt the resolution of the Conimissiou, 
approved September 5, 1904. and embodied in Act No. 
16 of the Laws of the Canal Zone, pro\'iding that 
officers of the Army and Navy, or of the Public 
Health and Marine HospiUil Ser\*ice. who may be as- 
signed to duty under the Isthmian Canal Commis- 
sion on the Isthmus, shall be paid from the Commis- 
sion's appropriations additional compensation equal 
to 50% of their authorized pay and allowances, when 
on duty in the United States, be hereby revoked. 

Resolved furi her. That, effective September 15, 190^. 
the compensation of officers of the Army and Navy, 
or of the Public Health and Marine HospiUil Service, 
who are or may be ordered lo duty under the Com- 
mission on the Istlimus, shall receive the compensa- 
tion of the position to which they are assigned, the 
difference between their service pay, and such com- 
pensation to be paid from the Commission's appro- 
priations, or they shall receive from such appropri 
ations. in addition to their ser\'ice pay, the increase 
authorized by law for service in the tropics. 

MEDICAL TREATATENT OF EMPLOYES. 

Resoh'ed, That paragraph 2, section A, of the regu- 
lations governing the treatment of persons by the 
physicians and iu the hospitals of the Department 
of Sanitation, as adopted at the 124th meeting of the 
Isthmian Canal Commission, heldat Culebra. April 34. 
1907. and amended at the 126th meeting of the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission, held at Culebra. May 21. 
2907. be furtheraniended to read as follows : 

"*A charge of 51 shall be made for each \-isit by a 
physician of the Health Department to an employe 
at his home or quarters : Provided, that if he is un- 
able to go to the dispensary, no charge shall be made 
for the first visit to such employe. Employes living 
with their fami.es in Commission quarters who, in 
the opinion of the visiting physician, can not safely. 
or conveniently, report at the dispensary for treat- 
ment, shall, if they so desire, be treated at their 
homes without charge." 

Resolved. That paragraph 4 of section D of the 
same regulitions be amended to read as follows: 
''For the use of a private room a charge of S2.50 
shall be made, and for other special attention the 
charges shall be same as for an employe," 



Reduced Rate on Hambtirg-Aiueric i n Line. 

The Colon agent of the Hamburg-- American 
Line has been authorized to grant a re- 
duction of 25 per cent to employes of the 
Isthmian Canal Commission traveling on 
vessels in the Atlas service. This rate will 
be granted to employes only on presentation 
of a letter signed by the Chief Quarter- 
master. The Atlas service includes vessels 
plying between New York and Colon. 



Mr. S. G. Baker has been appointed As- 
sistant Chief Clerk of the Atlantic Division, 
and will have charge of all property and 
material. Mr. Ben Jenkins has been ap- 
pointed Acting Chief Timekeeper of the 
Atlantic Division during the absence of Mr. 
C. P. Shea, Chief Timekeeper. 



HEALTH REPO.^T FOR AUGUST. 

steady Improvement During Four Years. 

Ancon, C. Z., September 10, 1908. 
Col. Geo. W. Goethals, 

Chan-iittt:i Islhniian Canal Co'rUtnission , Culebra. 

Sir— The report for the month of ."August 
sho\v.s that the health conditions on the Isth- 
mus are satisfactor\-. 

In August, 1905, we had on our rolls 5,269 
whites, among whom we had S deaths, giving 
us a rate of IS. 22 per thousand. In .\ugust, 
1S07, these figures were, respectively, 11,- 
733, 17 and 17.38; iu Augast, 19J3, 12,607, 
10 and 9.52. 

This shows a steady improvement in the 
three years in the death rates of the whites. 
Taking the negro employes, we have for 
the same period — and considering the same 
figures — 1905, 24,285 employes, 145 deaths, 
with an average per thousand for the month 
of 71.60; 1907, 27,710 employes, 76 deaths, 
and a rate of 31.75 per thousand; 190S, 31,- 
618, il and 12.14. This improvement in 
the death rate of our negro emplo\es is the 
most noteworthy in the report. In the three 
years the death rate among the negroes has 
dropped from 71.60 per thousand to 12.14 
per thousand. The exceptional!}' high rate 
for 1906 was due to the fact that during .Au- 
gust of this year we were at the height of a 
severe epidemic of pneumonia among our 
negro employes. Of the 145 deaths which 
occurred that month among our negro em- 
ployes, 60 deaths were caused by pneumo- 
nia ; among the il deaths among our negro 
employes in 1908, only 4 were due to pneu- 
monia. Taking our total working force, and 
considering the month of August for the 
past four years, we have the following fig- 
ures : 

Tolal Force. Deaths. Annual Rate 

1905 10,687 32 35.93 

1906 29,555 153 62.12 

1907 40,443 93 27.59 

1903 44,225 42 11.39 

showing a decrease in our death rate from 
35.93 in August, 1905, to 11.39 in August, 
1908. Considering individual diseases, we 
had in our working force in August, 1906, 
29 deatlis from malaria; in August, 1907, 21 
deaths, and in .\ugiist, 1908, 9 deaths. The 
deaths from malaria in a force of 29,000 men 
in August, 1906, were more than three times 
as numerous as in a force of 44,000 men Au- 
gust, 1908. Taking the cases of malaria ad- 
mitted to our hospitals from employes, we 
had, in August, 1907, 2,181; in August, 1908, 
1,525. Malaria is probably the best measure 
of the efficacy of the sanitary measures taken, 
considering, from a malarial point of view, 
that the climatic conditions on the isthmus 
are about the same from year to year, and anj- 
marked improvement in the number of deaths 
and the number of cases is probably due di- 
rectly to the preventive measures taken. 
This might not be equally true of the gen- 
eral death rate or the general sick rate. For 
example, the general death rate in 1906 
among employes was almost doubled on ac- 
count of the epidemic of pneumonia which , 
prevailed at that time, but I doubt if our san- 
itary measures had much effect in the de- 
crease in pneumonia, which has taken place 
since that time. 

Considering typhoid fever in 1905 among 
employes, we had 9 deaths; in 1907, 7 
deaths, and in 1908, no deaths. Consider- 
ing dysentery, in 1906 we had 10 deaths ; in 
1907, 6 deaths, and in 1908, 2 deaths. The 



sick rate is the best measure of the average 
effectiveness .of the force, so far as they are 
affected by the health conditions. In 1906 
we had among every thousand of our em- 
ployes sick every day 42.67 men; in 1907, 
29.02, and in 1908, 25.24. Judging by past 
experience, our sick rate will .steadily de- 
crease from the present time until May next. 

There have been no cases of \'ellow fever 
or pla.gue originating on the Isthmus in the 
past two years. 

."Vmong the 8,175 white Americans con- 
nected with the Isthmian Canal Commis- 
sion, 2,869 of whom were women and chil- 
dren, there were onl}- two deaths, one due 
to drowning and the other to childbirth— 
that is, not a single case of death from dis- 
ease. 

V^ery respectfully, 

W. C. GORG.\S, 
ChirJ' Sanitary O^cer. 

Yellow Fever and Plagwe Decreasing. 

The Department of Sanitation reports that 
during August the quarantine imposed against 
ports in which _\'ellow fever or plague prevail 
has been maintained, although improvement 
has occurred in a number of infected ports 
with which we have commercial relation. 
This has been noticeably so in Guayaquil, and 
for the first time since the commencement of 
plague in that port, no cases of death have 
been reported from this disease on the bills 
of health, for a period of two weeks. Ver\- few 
cases of human plague are now occurring in 
that town, but rat infection still e.xists, so that 
itistoo early to forma definite opinion as to 
whether the disease has been practically 
eradicated, or whether this is the quiescent 
stage, which is so common regarding this 
disease in infected ports. 

An improvement has also taken place in 
Trinidad, and no human cases of plague 
have been reported for three or four weeks. 
However, rat infection presumabh- still ex- 
ists, and as long as such remains the case, 
the protective measures are just as impor- 
tant as when human cases are occurring. 

No new ports have been added to the list 
on account of the appearance of either yel- 
low fever or plague. 

Improving Traospo. tation from the Cut. 

Work will begin at once on new track con- 
struction at Pedro Miguel. The new in- 
clined track leading from Culebra Cut, near 
the Panama railroad bridge over the Canal 
at Paraiso, is partly completed and will be 
extended to the main line of the railroad 
about 1,000 feet north of the depot at Pedro 
Miguel. Immediately south of this a cross- 
over will be put in, the north point of which 
will be the beginning of a double track to 
the southward, extending it about half a 
mile further north than at present. A signal 
tower will be put in west of the track on the 
cross-over, anil an interlocking switch sys- 
tem will be installed by which trains at this 
point will be controlled. As soon as this 
system is in operation, all the loads going 
south out of the Cut will be handled over 
this line, leaving the lock site entirely under 
the control of the Pacific Division. South 
bound trains fr m Culebra Cut now go out 
through the lock .site. The change will fa- 
cilitate the handling of trains at this point. 

Excavation for the material-handl ing docks 
at Gatun is practically finished and the con- 
struction of the docks will be begun as soon 
as piles can be secured for the foundation. 



22 



THE CANAL RECORD 



SOCIA.L LIFE OF THE ZONE. 

Women's Clnba aud Oth-r Features. 

The Empire Woman's Club held its weekly 
meeting on Tuesday afternoon at 3 o'clock, 
when a program was given under the 
musical and literary department. Miss 
Lewis, of Camp Elliott, gave an informal 
talk on Paris, and its points of historic in- 
terest. Piano selections were given by Miss 
Wade, and songs by Miss Moulton. Tea 
was served at the tastefully decorated tables 
in one of the smaller rooms, and the social 
hour was much enjoyed. A number of 
guests from out of town were present. 

Throughout the clubs there is a strong 
disposition to take up serious study, and 
programs are being outlined and work for 
the winter is being earnestly discussed. 

Lal5or Day, September 7, was observed at 
Empire by athletic sports and games, 
speeches, and a public demonstration ar- 
ranged by the mechanics. The observance 
commenced with a street parade headed by 
the official band. In the evening a dance 
was given at Kangaroo hall, which was largely 
attended. 

The women residents of Gatun have formed 
a sewing circle which meets every \Vednes- 
day at the residence of one of the members 
for the purpose of making useful and fancy 
articles for a sale to be held within a few 
weeks, the proceeds to be devoted to philan- 
thropic purposes. A small initiation fee and 
nominal v.-eekl.v dues are charged, the 
money being used for the purchase of ma- 
terials for the work. The circle commenced 
a few weeks ago with a membership of 22. 

The Fortnightly Club at Gatun continues 
its dances which are enjoyable features of 
the social life of the community. The 
monthly dance is always well attended. A 
new dancing club has recently been organized 
with membership open to all residents of 
the town. Dances are given every Wednes- 
day evening. The Young People's Christian 
League is an active part of the social life of 
Gatun. Its socials and meetings are always 
well attended. 

The Gatun Woman's Club will resume its 
regular meetings in October. The regular 
sessions will be preceded by an open even- 
ing meeting to which all the residents will 
be invited. It is hoped that in this way 
interest in the club will be increased. 

The Gorgona Woman's Club held its 
meeting for election of officers for the next 
six months on Tuesday, September 8, with 
the following result: President, Mrs. E. S. 
Calvit, re-elected; vice-president, Mrs. A. C. 
Everestt; secretary, Mrs. R. E. Phillipps; 
treasurer, Mrs. James Crockett. Mrs. L. F. 
La Rose was appointed press secretary. A 
committee was appointed to make arrange- 
ments for the coming Federation meeting, 
with Mrs. Frank Morrison as chairman. 

The Gorgona Dramatic Company will 
give a performance of "A Fisherman's 
Luck" at the Empire clubhou.se on Wednes- 
day evening, September 16. 

The Ancon Woman's Club will hold its 
regular meeting at the Tivoli hotel on Wed- 
nesday, September 16. Dr. Van Kueber 
will give an address on the San Bias 
Indians. 

The Isthmian Dancing Club of Culebra 
gave its first dance at the clubhouse on 
Saturday evening, September 12. The club 
was organized September 8, with Mr. H. B. 



Bains, Mr. F. B. Byram and Mr. L. Burns 
as officers. There is a membership of 4.5. 
.\ dance will be given monthly. 

The Culebra Sunday school treat at the 
Comuussion Chapel on Friday, September 11, 
was the important event of the week to the 
juniors and their friends. The committee 
in charge of arrangements had decorated 
the rooms with giant ferns and tropical 
plants. Games began at 4 o'clock and con- 
tinued until 6 when supper was served. The 
smaller children were conveyed to their 
homes in the Commission wagonette at 7 
o'clock. Each child was presented with a 
:-'r.ivenir of the occasion. About ninety were 
; sisent. 

The Culebra Sundaj- school was organized 
one year and a half ago and has a member- 
;,'.ip of over 100, including 15 teachers. 
T'le school holds its sessions at the Com- 
mission chapel every Sunday morning at 
9.30 o'clock. 

The Tivoli Club gave a dance in honor 
of President-elect Obaldia at the hotel on 
•Saturday evening, September 12. The en- 
trance hall was decorated with the Panama- 
nian and American flags. Mr. and Mrs. 
Obaldia arrived at about 9 o'clock and 
dancing commenced shortly after. A sup- 
per was served at 10 o'clock. The official 
table, where the guests of honor and mem- 
bers of the Commission were seated was 
laid for 14. The table was banked with 
brilliant flowers and foliage from the hos- 
pital gardens. 

The Commission Band. 

The Commission Band, which contributes 
largely to the social life of the Zone, has 
been organized since September, 1905. It 
owes its inception to a few public spirited 
men, who realized the value of such an or- 
ganization, both as recreation for the mem- 
bers and as a source of pleasure to the pub- 
lic. With the cooperation of the Commis- 
sion, which appropriated ^00, instruments 
and necessary equipment were secured, and 
the band soon attained sufficient proficieucy 
to appear in public. The first organization 
consisted of a president, vice-president, sec- 
retary and treasurer, and director, and thirt\'- 
seven members, all employes of the Com- 
mission or the Panama railroad. Although 
the interest and enthusiasm of the members 
was kept up, it was nevertheless difficult to 
hold them together, there Iieing little in- 
ducement to travel across the Isthmus for 
the necessary rehearsals after a hard day's 
work. On March 27, 1907, the Commission 
authorized the employment of a director at 
$2,000 per year, a librarian at $1,500, and 
thirty-five men at $25 per month each. 

The business of the organization is directed 
by a board of managers, consisting of a 
chairman and two other members, and a 
musical director and a librarian devote all 
their time to the band'sinterests. Theoffice 
is at Cristobal, where the weekly rehearsals 
are held. There are forty members at pres- 
ent, eighteen different classes of Canal work 
being represented. All of the members are 
uniformed in khaki. The present appropri- 
ation for the maintenance of tl'ie band in- 
cludes besides the allotment for salaries, an 
amount for the purchase of instruments, 
uniforms, and music. The band has a library 
worth nearly $1,000, to which additions are 
constantly being made. 

Bandstands have been erected at Hotel 
Tivoli at Ancon, at Paraiso, Culebra, Las 



Cascadas, Gorgona, Bas Opispo, and Cristo- 
bal, and concerts are given at these places 
at least once a month. 

Besides the official band there are private 
orchestras at Culebra, Gorgona, and Las 
Cascadas. These orchestras, which were 
organized for the purpose of playing at 
dances and other social functions, draw their 
members largely from the official band. 



PERSONAL. 



Mr. W. G. Tubby, chief of the old Divi- 
sion of Material and Supplies, and Mrs. 
Tubby, left for the States on September 15, 
intending to visit Jamaica on the way. Mr. 
Tubby has been in the Canal service nearly 
three years without a vacation. He has 84 
days' leave of absence, at the expiration of 
which his resignation will go into effect. 

R. M. Arango, Division Engineer of the 
Division of Meteorology and River Hjdrau- 
lics, has resigned his position on account of 
ill health, and at the expiration of 42 d.iys' 
leave of absence will sever his connection 
with the service. 

Mr. W. M. Belding, master builder, chief 
of the old division of building construction, 
went to Costa Rica for forty-two days on 
September 15, and on the expiration of his 
leave will submit his resignation. 

Capt. Courtland Nixon, U. S. A., who is 
to be Depot Quartermaster at Mount Hope, 
sailed from New York on the Colon, Sep- 
tember 10, and is due at Cristobal Septem- 
ber 16. 

Upon the recommendation of the Ameri- 
can Consul General at Panama, Hon. Arnold 
Shanklin, Mr. C. E. Guyant has been ap- 
pointed Deputy Consul General. Mr. Guyant 
was formerl}' employed in the division of 
municipal engineering. 

Mrs. Geo. W. Goethals, accompanied by 
her son, Thomas Goethals, sailed for the 
States on September 14, on the Finance. 

Among the arrivals on the Esperanza, 
which reached Colon September 11, were the 
wife, sou and daughter of Maj. J. P. Jervey, 
of Gatun. 

Mr. M. R. Currie has returned from his 
leave in the States, and has been appointed 
District Quartermaster at Bas Obispo. 



St. Mary's Church at Empire. 

A contract has been let for the construc- 
tion of the new Protestant Episcopal church 
at Empire, to be known as St. Mary's, and 
work will be begun at once. The building 
will be 64 feet long and 26 feet wide, and 
will seat about 200 people. It will be in the 
general style of commission buildings, will 
be located near the court house, and will be 
paid for by a private fund already raised by 
subscription. 



On Sunday next, at 9.30 a. m.. Father 
Collins will deliver an address in Ancon 
chapel on the "Church of the Holy Re- 
deemer, Culebra," and at 2.30 p. m., he 
will deliver an address on the same subject 
in the hall above the East La Boca mess. 



Miss Ethel Lokey and Mr. William E. 
Roessner were married in the reception hall 
of the nurses' quarters at Ancon on the even- 
ing of September 8, by the Rev. John S. 
Calm. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



23 



PACIFIC ROCK EXCAVATION. 

Preparations Under Way Between La Boca 
and Mlraflores. 

Preparations for the rock excavation in the 
Canal between Miraflores and La Boca are 
well under way, although the mud that over- 
lies the rock must be excavated by dredges 
before work can be begun on the rock. Bor- 
ings are being made to determine the quan- 
tity and nature of the rock, a Lolmitz rock 
crusher is on the ways in process of con- 
struction, and a contract has been let for a 
submarine rock drill barge. 

Borings now being made are in continua- 
tion of the exploration begun some time 
ago. The prism of the Canal between Mira- 
flores and La Boca includes the old French 
canal, which was excavated as far as Coro- 
zal. In the channel of the French canal the 
borings are made from platforms, and even 
the holes that are sunk on the bank are be- 
ing put down under very trying conditions, 
as at high tide the ground is covered with 
two feet, or more, of water, so that svich 
work as is not done in the water itself is 
done in soft mud. The drills are sunk 5 feet 
below the full depth of the proposed chan- 
nel, i. c. 50 feet below mean sea-level. 
Present indications are that the amount of 
rock to be removed is not so great as was 
originally believed. The suction dredge 
Sandpiper is at work in the prism at Coro- 
ral. taking earth off the rock strata, and the 
old French ladder dredge 14-A is doing 
similar work opposite the La Boca wharf. 

The contract for the rock drill barge has 
been let to the Maryland Steel Company, 
who will deliver the barce and machinery, 
knocked down, on the Isthmus before the 
1st of January, 1909. It will be erected at 
the marine shops at La Boca. The hull on 
which the drills will be mounted will be 112 
feet long, with a 6-foot rake on each end, 
36 feet wide, and 8 feet deep, built of steel 
and of specially heavy construction, in order 
that rock may be blasted under the barge 
without doing it any damage. There will 
be six transverse solid bulkheads and I lon- 
gitudinal bulkheads. Two of the compart- 
ments formed by the bulkheads will be used 
as water tanks, and they will have a capac- 
ity of 18,000 gallons. Oil will be used as 
fuel, and 6 fuel oil tanks will be installed, 
each with a capacit\' of 240 barrels. The 
boiler and pumps will be erected in the side 
of the hull opposite that on which tlie drills 
will operate, and the water and (s-1 storage 
tanks will be amidship, thus trimn:ing the 
barge. The capacity of the boiler will be 
sufficient to supply without forcing 30 per 
cent more steam than is needed for running 
three Ingersoll-Sargent drills 6'/; inches in 
diameter, one 5-k. vv. electric li.ght plant, 
and an 8-horse power deck pump. Three drill 
frames will be mounted on the hull, each 
moving freely along one face of the barge, 
allomng a total horizontal distance of 8.5 
feet between the fir.st and last drill holes. 
Each frame will carry a rock drill on a mov- 
ing slide, running in vertical guides on the 
face of the frame; afterthe manner of a pile- 
driver. The floor is projected outboard 
about 4 feet, so that the drilling will be done 
over the edge of the barge. Each of the 
drills can bore six holes from one position 
of the barge; the number of holes that can 
be bored without shifting the position of the 
barge thus being ei.ghteen. 

A vertical hvdraulic ram, located immedi- 



ately back of the drill frames, will raise and 
lower each drill. These rams will have a 
capacity of 5,000 pounds, and will make a 
total free lift of 10 feet. A duplex, double- 
acting, hydraulic pump will supply water 
for working each ram, the capacity to be 
suflicient to lift the drill, with its ordinary 
load of 2,500 pounds, 10 feet in not more 
than 15 seconds. A recess will be made 
near each corner of the hull for timber spuds, 
24 inches square and 60 feet lon.g. These 
spuds will be operated by a compact revers- 
ible engine, designed to lift each .spud by 
two pinions, acting in racking on opposite 
faces. 

By the aid of this machine holes will be 
drilled in the rock to a depth of 50 feet, 
which is 5 feet below the depth required on 
the Pacific level of the Canal, and the rock 
will then be broken by dynamite into pieces 
small enough to be handled by dipper or 
ladder dredges. 

The Lolmitz subaqueous rock breaker, 
which is on the ways, was shipped knocked 
down, from Renfrew, Scotland. The barge 
is of steel, 100 by 28 by 8 feet, with a recess 
in one end through which the ram or rock 
breaker works. The method of operation 
is to raise the heavy ram a given distance 
above the surface of the rock to be crushed 
and let it fall, much as a pile driver works. 
The ram is raised and dropped until therock 
on which it is operating is penetrated to the 
required depth when the barge is moved i 
another spot and the operation repeatcl . 
The rams are 50 feet lon.g, made of forg ' 
steel, and weigh 15 tons. On the lov - 
end is fitted a point made of specially hii- 
dened steel. In certain kinds of rock the 
breaker has proved very successful, pulver- 
izing it so well that it has been handled by 
dredges more rapidly than rock broken by 
blasting. The Lobnitz machine will sup- 
plement the work done by the rock drill 
barge and blasting. 



Empire Club Howse. 

The duckpin tonmanient. that h.is been rtuminp 
ff)r some .six or eight weeks, closed on last Friday 
evening. The winners of the tonmanient will be 
pnblished as .soon as the committee turns in the re- 
port of the standings. 

The Isthmian chatnpionship tenpin bowlinj? tour- 
nament will be rolled on the Kmpire alle>s Thanks- 
giving Day. Full particulais will be pnblished later. 

The Gorgona Dramatic Club will give the play "A 
I'isherman's I.iick " in the Empire Y. M. C. -A., hall 
on Wednesday evening. September 16. The Empire 
members welcome the club to Empire. 



OFnCIAL CIRCULAR. 

Lands Expropriated for Lakes. 

CiRcvr..-iii No. 47. 

The following account is hereby created under 
General Account Ko. 1. " Classified Expenditures " : 
610. Lands Exprotriattd for Lakes in CoiincclioiiwHli 
Lock Canal . 
To this account will be charged all payments for 
lands acquired by the Commission which are to he 
flooded, including all expenses in connection with 
their purchase or expropriation. 

Edward J. Wii-liams. 

Disbnrsins OlTicer. 
.Vpproved : 

Geo. W. GoiiTHAtji. 

Chairman. 
Empire. C. Z.. September 14, 1908. 

Misdirected Letters. 

Division of Dead Letters. 
Ancon. C. Z.. September 16. 190S. 
The following insufficiently addressed letters, origi- 
nating in the United States and its possessions, have 
been received in the office of the Director of I'osts. 
and niaj' be secured on renuest of addressee : 
Acklev. Xorman C. H.Trding. c. 

Clark, W. D. Mahon, John 

Cumiiiings, I.eraine Kiinale, Ki,.iiard 

Dedge. Graham G. .'^mallwood, W. P. 

Drake C B Van Order. Capt. George 

l-i.sche'r. ChaS- J. Vnlleley. Alfred 

Fitzgerald. James Williams. Clarence 

Hammer. H. H. 

Concerts by the I. C. C. Band. 
I,AS CASC.\DAS 
Sunday, September 20. 190S, at 2 30 p. m.: 

PROGR..\M. 



1 March— 0«<- Republic 

2 Selection— .4 H'allz Dream 

t a Intermezzo — Merry ll^idmo-- 



Ilngley 

...Stnuss 
I.ehar 



! 4 Scliottiscln^iiV .Ve Be Yonr Lemon 

I Coon Allen 

4 Waltz— .l/j- Lady Daushler Blake 

5 Barytone Solo— Zf/ a// (»0' Leach 

D. E. NORCROSS. 

6 Medley— War ^OHA'-'fl/ the Boys in 

Slue Laurendeau 

7 Overture—//'/ IVere Kins Adam 

„(« Tone Vcxm— Lilacs Robert.? 

"I* March- //(j#Av Days '.evi 

9 Descriptive— /I ILuiilin;: Scene Bncalossi 

10 ^lavQix—Underllie Double Easle Wagner 

CRISTOBAL 
On baud stand near Clubhouse. Wednesday. Septem- 
ber 23. 1908, at S. 15 P. m.: 

PROGRAM. 

1 March— 5'a/»/c the Flag Pierson 

2 Selection— TVif Red MUt Herbert 

, ( a Vo\\i.n—Honipipe Smith 

■* I * March (by reciuest)— //o»fv Boy Von Tilzer 

4 Duet for Clarinets— A'a»i«^ Marsal 

MESSRS. ORAV AND HALE. 

5 Selection— .l/<jr//«Ha Wallace 

6 W.altz— .-) « irtV'i Dream Herman 

7 Coniet Solo (by request)- 7"/;r Holy O/j" -Adams 

CH.\S. E. JENNINGS. 

8 Overture — Sunshine and .Sho-.uers Flath 

9 Descriptive— .-J Hunting Scene Bucalo.ssi 

10 Galop— 0« Horseback Bendix 

Ch.as. E. Jenni.vgs. Musical Director. 
A concert will be given at the Hotel Tivoli. Sun- 
day evening. October 4. 



STATEMENT OF CLASSIFIED EXPENDITURES TO JULY 31, 1908. 

The following table shows expenditures for Canal work, classified monthly, since July 
1, 1907. The figures give only expenditures which have been located. In addition, there 
have been some disbursements, such as purchasing material, etc., which it will not be 
possible to locate to a specified account until their use has been finally determined : 



Period. 



Prior to July I, 1907. 



July 

August 

September . 
October. . . . 
November. . 
December.. 



Civil Admin-! 
istration. 



Sl.443.266.65 $4,613,800.61 



Construction Municipal 
and Improve- 

Engineering.! ments. 



?13.4.-i3.745.05 ; $4,277,160.18 



Plant Ac- 
count. 



J19.451.579.ll $43,224,551.60 



1903— 
January. . 
Kebm.ar.v . 

March 

April 

May 

tune 

July 



51,1S3.S4 
67,548.53 
63,239.62 
53.227.97 
54.529.02 
64.903.(» 



e«.S02.92 
72.514.14 
63.653.60 
74,046.55 
73.340.26 
379,34 
84,898.15 



149.270.94 
214.01S.n.5 
253.10S.77 
lS9,196..iS 
166,3.S1.S2 
213.725.16 



962.477.19 
1.196,803.45 
1,194.304.55 
1,372.311.81 
1,217.120.31 
1,569.822.79 



221. 866.30 

174.076.77 

165.311.77 I 

17S.041.65 , 

184.3S1..35 

200,833.07 

197.963.07 



1.4h^.021.44 
1.523.011.72 
1.460.229.91 
1..SS0.416.19 
1.5S0..369.11 
1,755.771.69 
1,452.698.88 



1.16,131.93 
192,227.75 
107,840..S5 
123,9.W.SS 
115.625.44 
125,420.96 



5.80.562.68 

767. 1.53.24 

1,068.300.58 

1.131.450,91 

1.105.590.16 

591,298.02 



1. 889.626.58 
2.4,37,751.00 
2.6.86.794.67 
2.370.126.95 
2.659,246.75 
2.365.169.97 



156 
100 
110 
1,38 

69 
107. 

91 



.956.22 
00.40 
.2.52. 15 
115.21 
,824.83 
940.79 
,901.17 



,.5S4,.S21.9S 
889.405.82 
,307.,321.82 
797,1.'7.63 
955.405.12 
905.767.19 
544.083.23 



.493,46.8.86 
.7.59.708.85 
.106.749.25 
.767.757.23 
.863.320.67 
,969.933.40 
..371,544.50 



Total. 



$2,232,774.95 ' $7,126,975 69 $31,567,104,39 \ $5.864.017.76 $ 31,679.87 7.49 ! $78,470, 750.28 



24 



THE CANAL RECORD 



COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT. 

COMMISSARY PRICES 

For week beginniiiic September 15 : 
FRESH MEATS. POULTRY AND COLU MEATS. 

Pike. 

Beef— Sirloin roast per lb 30 

Rump roast per lb 30 

Porterhouse per lb .'0 

Rib-roast, short cut (not under 3V4 

pounds) per lb 24 

Rib-ro.Tst. second cut tnot under 3 

pounds) per lb 20 

Chuck-roast (not under 3 pounds) ..per lb 15 

Soup per lb y 

Stew I'er lb 12 

Corned per lb.. 12. 14. 16 

Suet per lb 4 

Steaks— Sirloin per lb 30 

Porterhouse per lb 30 

Rump per lb 30 

Tenderloin per lb 30 

Round per lb 24 

Veal— Cutlets per lb 24 

Short-cut chops per lb 24 

Loin per lb 23 

Entire forequarter (13 to 20 lbs). ..per lb 11 

For stewing per lb 11 

Mutton- Entire fore<niarter (not under 

10 pounds) per lb 9 

Short-cut chops per lb . 20 

UeR (S to 10 pounds) per lb IS 

Lamb— I-'or stewing per lb 10 

Entire forequarter per lb 10 

Chops perlb 30 

Pork— Cuts per lb 20 

Livers— Beef perlb 11 

Sausatte- Pork perlb 16 

Sweet bread— Veal each 1.20 

Beef perlb 25 

Ox tongues each 90 

Eeks, fresh dozen 34 

Chickens— Dressed (milk-fed) each l.;-0 

Large each 1.65 

Capons each 2.40 

Broilers each 60 

Fowls, medium and large each. SOc. and 1.00 

Ducks, fatted tfancy) each 1.10 

Suckling pigs each 4.90 

Turkeys per lb 30 

Squabs each 45 

Bacon— Strips perlb 23 

English . bre;Uifast sliced perlb §26 

Ham — Sugar-cured, sliced perlb §25 

One-half, for boiling per lb §20 

Westphalia per lb 45 

Ferris ler lb 19 

Beef. salt, family perlb 16 

Salt pork perlb 13 

DAIRY PRODUCTS. 

Butter — Prints, ijrime quality per lb 33 

Cheese — Roquefort perlb 45 

Neufchatel each 6 

Young America ■ pel lb 11 

Swiss per lb 33 

Couda - per lb 3J 

Edam each 1.03 

Camenibert per lb 28 

McLaren's jar 15 

Piiixter's tin 11 

French cheese in tins — Camenibert, Roque- 
fort. Brie. Neufchatel tin 20 

Buttermilk quart 15 

VEGETABLES AND FRUITS. 

Tomatoes perlb 6 

Lettuce per lb 14 

Cauliflower per lb 10 

White potatoes perlb SVa 

Sweet potatoes per lb 2V2 

Cabbage perlb 4 

Onions per lb 3 '2 

Cucumbers per lb 6 

Turnips perlb 3 

Beets per lb 3 

Squash (summer) perlb 3 

Lima Beans perlb 8 

Celery bunch 15 

Limes hundred 40 

Lemons dozen 18 

Oranges dozen IS 

G.-npefruit each 3 

C.inteloupes ; e;ich 10 

Watermelons each 35 

Grapes perlb 10 

Apples per lb 5 

Peaches perlb IS 



Flood Stages In the Chagres. 

Jlaximuni height of Chagres above low 
water for the week ending midnight, Sep- 
tember 12, 1908 : 




Height of low water 
above mean sea 
level, feet I 

Maximum height ab.i 
low water, feet: j 
Sunday, Sept. 6 ....' 
Monday, .Sept. 7. 
Tuesday. Sept. 8 
Wedn'sday.Sept. 9 
Thursday. Sept. 10. 

Friday. Sept. 11 

.Saturday. Sept. 12.. 

IMaximum for week.. 



KHint'ali, September 1 to 12, 1 ans. Inolu- 
sivf. 

(MIDNKillT TO Mlti.NIGHT.) 

Maximum 

Stations. in Total, 
one day. 

AtlaiiiU Dh'isioH — 

Cristob,al .84 4.38 

Brazos Brook .■ 1.03 4.59 

Galun 1.21 3.88 

Bohio 1,65 ^ 3.61 

Central Division — 

Tabewiilla 2.00 6.79 

San Pablo 1.84 4.81 

Bas Obispo .79 3.37 

Gainboa .56 3,07 

Empire .87 3.19 

Caniacho .65 3.00 

Culebra 2.27 4.66 

KioGrandc 3.26 5.40 

I'actfic Dii'ision — 

Pedro Miguel .57 1.86 

La Boca .43 .85 

Aucou .50 1.02 

Upt>ei' Chasyes. 

Alh.-ijnela 216 7.34 

Tug Service Porto Bello and Nombre de 
Dius. 

Effective. August 6. 1908: The following is the 
schedule f(jr tug service between Cristobal. Porto 
Bello and Nombre de Dios: 

Sunday: I,eave Cristobal 6.3C p. m. for Porto Bello 
only; returning same day. 

Monday: Leave Cristobal after Train 2 for Porto 
Bello and Nombre de Dios: returning same day. 

Tuesday: I^eave Cristobal after Train 2 without 
tow, for I'orto Bello only: returning, leave Porto 
Bello 2.15 p, m.. without tow. 

Wednesday: Leave Cristobal after Train 2 for 
Porto Bello :iiid Nombre de Dios: returning same 
day. 

Friday: Leave Cristobal after Train 2 for Porto 
Bello and Nombre de Dios: returning same day. 

Saturday: Leave Cristobal after Train 2 for Porto 
Bello only: returning, leave Porto Bello 5.30 p. m. 



Vessels arriving at and departing from the I'ort of 
Ancon during the week ending September 11 were: 

Arrivals — September 5. /V7««wrt, from V'alparaiso ; 
September 8. San Jost', from San Francisco : .Septem- 
ber 11. Ecuador, from Buenaventuni. 

Departures — September S. Aysen, to Valparaiso: 
September S. Newport, to San Francisco, 



LEGAL NOTICE. 



^) Sold only from cold-storage and not from Com- 
missaries. 



United States 1 
of America j In the First Judicial Circuit. 
Canal Zone. I 
George Blake, Jamaican, died intestate Jul.\- 15. 
1907, leaving an estate, consisting of three houses in 
Pedro Miguel. The claimants for the estate have not 
proved that they are the legitimate heirs of the dece- 
dent, and the Collector of Revenues has filed a peti- 
tion for escheat under Sections 779-781 of the Code of 
Civil Procedure. 

Notice is hereby given to al! concerned to appear 
at the court lK>use in Ancon on October 5. 190S. at 
9 o'clock a. in., to establish their claims to the .said 
estate, or to show cause why the same should not 
escheat to the Canal Zone. 

Walter Emery. 
Circuit CouH Clerk. 



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS. 

The following is a list of the sailings of the Pan- 
ama Railroad Steamship Company, of the Royal 
Mail Steam Packet Company, of the Hamburg- 
.Mnerican Line, and of the United Fruit Company's 
Line, the Panama Railroad Company's dates being 
subject to change : 

FROM NEW YORK TO COLON. 

Pr. Aug. Wilhelm H.-A Saturday Sept. 12 

Advance P. R. R.Tuesday Sept. IS 

Orinoco R.-M .Saturday Sept. 19 

Allianca P. R. R.Monday Sept. 21 

Finance P. R. R.Saturday Sept. 26 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Saturday Sept. 26 

Panama P. R. R.Thursday Oct. 1 

Atrato R,-M.... .Saturday Oct. 3 

Colon PR. R.Tuesday Oct. 6 

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm H.-A Saturday Oct. 10 

Trent R,-M Saturday . . . .Oct. 17 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Saturday Oct. 24 

Tagus R.-M Saturday . . . .Oct. 31 

Prinz ."^ug. Wilhelm H.-.\ Saturday Nov. 7 

Magd.alena R.-M Saturday. .... Nov. 14 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Saturday Nov. 21 

Orinoco R.-M Saturday Nov. 28 

Atrato R.-M Saturday Dec. 12 

Trent R.-M Saturday Dec. 26 

All the steamers of the Hamburg-American and 
Rojal Mail lines call at Kingston enroute to Colon. 

FROM COLON TO NEW YORK. 

Espcranz;! P, R. R.Friday Sept. IS 

Atrato R.-M. .. .Tuesday Sept. 22 

Colon P. R. R.Wednesday Sept. 23 

Adv,ance P. R. R.Monday Sept. 28 

Pr. Aug. Wilhelm H.-A Tuesday Sept. 29 

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm. ...H.-A... .Tuesday Sept. 29 

.lUianca P. R. R.Saturday Oct. 3 

Clyde R.-M. ...Tuesday Oct. 6 

Finance P. R. R.Thursday Oct. 8 

Panama 



Prinz Joachim 

f^olon 

Ta.gus 

Prinz .\ug. Wilhelm.. 
Magdalena. 



.P. R. R.Tue-sday Oct. 13 

. H.-A Tuesday Oct. 13 

.P. R. R.Monday Oct. 19 

. R.-M Tuesday Oct. 20 

..H.-A Tuesday Oct. 27 

.R.-M:. ...Tuesday Nov. 3 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Tuesday Nov. 10 

Orinoco R.-M Tuesday Nov. 17 

Prinz .\ug. Wilhelm. ...H.-A Tuesday Nov. 24 

Atrato R.-M Tuesday ,Dec, 1 

Prinz Joachim H.-.\ Tuesday Dec. 8 

Trent R.-M Tuesday Dec. 15 

FROM NEW ORLEANS TO COLON. 

Parismina U.F.C.. Saturday Sept. 19 

Heridia U.F.C.. Saturday Sept. 26 

Cart:)KO U. F.C.. Saturday Oct. 3 

Parismina UF.C. Saturday Oct. 10 

Heridia U.FC. Saturday Oct. 17 

Cartago U.F.C..S;iturday Oct. 24 

Parismina U.F.C.. .=atui-day Oct. 31 

Heridia U.F.C.. Saturday Nov. 7 

Cartago U.F.C.. Saturday Nov. 14 

Parismina U.F.C., Saturday Nov. 21 

Heridia U.F.C., Saturdaj- Nov. 28 

FROM COLON TO NF.W ORLEANS. 

Cartago U.F.C. .Tuesday Sept. 22 

Parismina U.F.C. .Tuesday Sept. 29 

Heridia U.F.C. .Tuesday Oct. 6 

Carta,go U.F.C. .Tuesday Oct. 13 

Parismina U.F.CTuesd.ay Oct. 20 

Heridia U.F.C. .Tuesday Oct. 27 

Cartago U. F.C.. Tuesday' Nov, 3 

Parismina U.F.C. .Tuesday Nov. 10 

Heridia U. F.C.. Tuesday Nov. 17 

Cartago U.F.C. .Tuesday Nov. 24 

Parismina U.F.C. .Tuesday Dec. 1 

PROM COLON TO BARBADOS. CALLING AT TRINIDAD. 

Orinoco R.-M. ..Tuesday Sept. 29 

FRO:^r COLON TO NEW ORLEANS VIA KINGSTON. 

Tampican Ley land Line. .Sunday Sept. 20 

William Cliff Leyland Line. .Tuesday Sept. 29 

The Piimima railroad steamships sail at 3 p. m. 
fror.i dock at Cristobal direct to New York. 

Tlie Prinz steamers of the Plambnrg-American line 
sail from Colon at 1 p. m. via Kingston. Jamaica, 
for New York. 

All Rojal Mail steamers mentionedaboveleaveearly 
in the morning from Colon via Kingston, Jamaica, 
for New York. All mail and passengers should be 
on board early on day of sailing. 

The steamers of the United Fruit Company's line 
sail from New Orleans at 11 a. m,. and from Colon 
at 1.30 p. m.. via Port Limon. for New Orleans. In 
addition to the above, the United Fruit Company 
dispatches a steamer about every ten days from 
Colon, via Bocas del Toro. for New Orleans. 

.Sailings of the French line tCie. (ii^n^rale Trans- 
atlantique) for Venezuelan ports. Martinique and 
Guadeloupe on the 3d and 20th of each month. 



CANAL 




RECORD 



Volume II. 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1908. 



No. 4. 



The Canal Record 



Published weekly under the authority and supervision of the 
ISTHMIAN CANAL COMMISSION 

"The Canal Record''' is issued . free of charge, one 
copy each, to all employes of the Commission ajid Pan- 
ama Railroad ComPa7iy it-hose ?iames are on the" sold" 
roll. Extra copies can be obtained from the netvs 
stands ef tlie Panama Raihoad Co tn pan y /or Jive cents 
each 

Address all Communications 

THE CANAL RECORD 

Ancon, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama. 

No communication .either Jor Publication or request- 
ins injormation, will receive attention unless signed 
with the Jull name and address of the luriter. 



NOTES OF PROGRESS. 

Chan§:es in Organization. 

Official circulars published on other pages 
of this issue of The Canai. Record, give 
the details of the assignment to duty of 
Commissioners Hodges and Rousseau, the 
appointment of Mr. S. B.Williamson, as Di- 
vision Engineer of the Pacific Division, the 
division of work in the office of the Chair- 
man and Chief Rn.gineer, and the reorgan- 
ization of property accounting. 

Chairman's Monthly Report. 

The report of the Chairman of the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission for August is pub- 
lished in other columns of this issue of The 
Canal Record. The work of reorgan- 
ization was continued. A summary of the 
construction work done by the three con- 
struction divisions shows that the material 
excavated in August amounted to 3,318,691 
cubic yards, of which 1,375,991 were taken 
from the Canal prism. Rock drilling to 
the amount of 312,326.60 feet was done; 
19.58 miles of new track were laid, and 
358.82 tons of e.xplosives were used. 
The average number of laborers emplo\ed 
daily was 13,284. The rainfall in the At- 
lantic Division was 16.22 inches; Central Di- 
vision 8.11 inches, and Pacific Division, 9.89 
inches. 

In the Atlantic Division there were removed 
on the Gatun Lock site and site of the Ga- 
tun Dam spillway 190,262 cubic yards; by 
dredges in Limon Bay, 638,217 cubic yards 
from the Canal prism; by a dredge at the 
site of the Gatun handling docks, 51,505 
cubic yards, and bv steam shovels at Mindi, 
16,309 cubic yards'. At Gatun Dam 26,953 
cubic yards of material from the Locks' site 
were dumped in the Dam, 35,100 cubic yards 
of Bas Obispo rock were placed on the south 
toe, and 41,060 cubic yards of excavation 
from the spillway were dumped on the 
north toe. 

The excavation in the Central Division 
amounted to 1,540,610 cubic j'ards, 1,010.457 



cubic yards of which were rock. In the 
same territory in .August, 1907, 783,173 cu- 
bic yards were removed. In August, 1907, 
however, the average number of steam shov- 
els at work during the month was 39.90, 
while in .\ugust, 1908, the average number 
at work was 52.58. The rainfall in August, 
1907, was about 3.13 inches greater than ir 
the same month in 1908. The output per 
shovel per day was nearly 54 per cent greater 
than in the corresponding month in 1907. 

In the Pacific Division, on the lock site at 
Pedro Miguel 22,217 cubic yards of material 
were excavated, and from the lock site at 
Miraflores 91,440 cu1)ic yards. The excava- 
tion from the site of the Miraflores Dam 
amounted to 2,808 cubic yards, and from the 
prism at Cardenas Hill 17,667 cubic yards. 

The dredging at La Boca amounted to 
737,774 cubic yards. A force was engaged 
in cleaning the line of the Canal between 
La Boca and Miraflores. Borings are in 
progress to determine accurately the amount 
and character of the excavation between 
Miraflores and La Boca. A survey of the 
dredged channel was completed, and shows 
that the monthly estimates for dredging 
have been aliout 7.3 per cent greater than 
the amount determined by the survey. This 
difference is believed to be due largely to a 
refilling of the channel by cross currents. 

In the Mechanical Division the work of 
installing fuel oil burning apparatus made 
satisfactor\- progress. 

On the relocation of the Panama railroad 
32,315 cubic yards of earth were excavated, 
and 75,462 cubic yards were placed in em- 
bankments. One thousand four hundred 
and thirty-three linear feet of permanent 
track were laid, making the total to date 
40,745 feet. 

Health conditions continued satisfactory 
during August. 



Miraflores Tunnel. 

A retainin,g wall ten feet wide at the bot- 
tom and running down to four feet below 
the lowest point excavated has been built at 
the south portal of the Miraflores tunnel for 
the purpose of stopping the slide which has 
been threatening to close 'tp the south en- 
trance. The wall is 100 feet long and so lo- 
cated that it will become one side of the 
tunnel, which -will thus be lengthened 100 
feet. It is built of concrete reinforced with 
Ran.som bars. 

The slide, which was described in The 
Canal Record or August 12, has been 
uioving southward from one-fourth inch to 
one-half inch every day during the last two 
weeks. It is believed that the retaining 
wall will check it sufficiently to prevent 
.serious rupture of the timber lining in the 
earth section until the dry season, when the 
slide will probably stop of its own accord. 
The tunnel through the earth section will 



then be enlarged to permit the construction 
of a sufficiently heavy concrete lining. 

The work of putting concrete lining ir. 
the rock section, which is the northern two- 
thirds of the tunnel, is progressing rapidly, 
125 linear feet having lieen completed up to 
September 12. 

Sending Money Hotne. 

More money was sent totlie United States 
from the Canal Zone in the form of money 
orders during August than in any month 
since the American occupation, the amount 
being $328,786.38. The total amount of or- 
ders issued was S448,218.75, of which orders 
payable in the Canal Zone amounted to 
$119,432.37. 

The largest previous month's business in 
money orders was in April, 1908, when.*;445,- 
981.26 worth was issued, of which .5320,- 
750.36 was payable in the United States. All 
the orders payable in the United States were 
not destined for that country, because the 
European business is transacted through the 
New York post-office, but by far the greater 
amount of money sent in this waj- remains 
in the United States. The number of orders 
issued was 14,126, and the average value of 
each order was thus S31.73. The fees col- 
lected amounted to .'SI, 822. 06. The amount 
paid and repaid was $116,932.43, and the 
total volume of the monev order business 
was $566,937.24. 

In Cristobal, with a population of 3,558, 
there were issued 2,682 orders, amounting 
to $87,698.49, an average of $24.65 for 
each person. Of the total issued in Cris- 
tobal all but $8,987.80 was payable in the 
United States. At Empire orders to the 
amount of .$59,209.34 were issued, all but 
$16,534.62 of which were payable in the 
United States, the average amount per person 
being $11.52. From Culebra orders amount- 
ing to $40,301.36 were sent, the average per 
person being $7.31. At Gorgona the orders 
amounted to .$49,482.58, the average per 
person being $17.99. The average for the 
Zone was $8.96 per person. 

Records for TO-ton Shovels. 

The highest record yet made by a sho\-el 
in the 70-ton class was made in the month 
of August by shovel 102, which excavated 
43,694 cubic yards of rock and 1,820 cubic 
yards of earth, a total of 45,514 cubic yards, 
from the Lock site at Gatun. The best 
record in the Central Division for shovels of 
this class was made in August by shovel 115, 
working at San Pablo, which took out 
22,028 cubic yards of earth and 20,333 cubic 
yards of rock, a total of 42,361 cubic yards. 
Both of these shovels worked 25 days. 

Trial by Jury. 

A reprive of ninety daj'S has been granted 
Joaquin Segrera, who wasi sentenced .to be 
hanged on September 18, for the murder of 



26 



THE CANAL RECORD 



NOTES OF PROGRESS. 

{Contin tied) 

Enrique Vega, near Matachin, on December 
13, 1907. The reprieve is based entirely on 
the fact that Segrera was tried under section 
171 of the Code of Criminal Procedure of the 
Canal Zone, by three judges, after motion 
for a jury trial had been denied him. The 
case of Adolphus Coulson, who was tried in 
the same way and sentenced to death, is now 
before the Supreme Court of the United 
States, on a writ of error involving the right 
to trial by jury of persons in the Canal Zone, 
who are charged with murder. Pending de- 
cision on this point, execution has been sus- 
pended. Thispointof trial by jury, itshould 
be understood, is raised only with regard to 
capital crimes committed prior to February 
6. 1908, on which date the President issued 
an order granting a trial by jury in all such 
cases. 

Draining Black Sv^amp. 

Although the Black Swamp, where the 
Panama railroad crosses it at Ahorca Lagar- 
to, is only 1,500 feet from the Chagres River 
by a direct line, the swamp is prevented 
from being drained directly bj- a ridge 
which rises abruptly between it and the river 
to a height of from fifteen to twenty feet. 

Formerly the water which collects in this 
swamp flowed eastward under the railroad 
tracks to a shallow lake of large area, and 
finally drained back under the track and ran 
into the Chagres river at Bridges 26 and 27. 
From the point where Bridge 29 crosses the 
swamp to where the water flowed out at 
Bridge 26 it is four and one-half miles by 



the water course, although only two miles 
by the railroad. At Bridge 29 the elevation 
of the swamp is 20 feet above sea-level, and 
at Bridge 28, one mile south of Ivion Hill 
and three-quarters of a mile from Bridge 29. 
the elevation is 16 feet. 

In order to shorten the distance and to 
facilitate the movement of the water a drain- 
age ditch has been dug from Bridge 29 to 
Bridge 28 by a circuitous route, which makes 
the length of the ditch one and three-quar- 
ter miles. The water thus has three miles 
less distance than formerly to flow in order 
to reach the Chagres River, The channel 
was completed on September 8, and alreadv 
the surface of the water has been lowered 
one and one-half feet. This relieves the 
swamp of an immense weight of water and 
will give greater security to the Panama 
railroad tracks. It is thought that by keep- 
ing the new ditch free of vegetation the flow 
will not be impeded, and the water may be 
lowered one foot more. To this end a flat- 
lioat is kept plying through the ditch, re- 
moving such obstructions as grow there, or 
float into it. 

In digging this ditch two parties were sent 
out in flatboats, six men in a boat, one party 
beginning its work at Bridge 29 and the 
other at Bridge 28, It was necessary to cut 
through several ridges and to skirt the foot 
of one hill. The work included not only 
the excavation of a channel, but also the 
cutting of a way through the thick swamp 
growth. As it was impossible to run a line, 
the route was determined largelj- bj- the par- 
ties keeping in touch bj' shooting, and hy 
shouting to one another. Each party aver- 



LABOR FORCE AND QUARTERS. 



The report of the Chief Quartermaster 
shows that there was a surplus of labor dur- 
ing the month of August, and that it became 
very diflicult to place the incoming laborers. 
All recruiting has been suspended until 
further notice, and the services of one of 
the two labor agents, who have been oper- 
ating in the West Indies, have been dis- 
pensed with, leaving only three labor agents 
in the employ of the Commission; one in 
the United States, one in EuTope, and one 
in the West Indies. The total gold force 
at the end of August was 4,396, as com- 
pared with 4.477 at the end of July; there 
were 252 additions to the .gold roll and 330 
separations. The silver force increased in 
August, from 21,0+9 to 21,486; 616 contract 
laborers were received during the month, of 
whom 296 were West Indians and 320 were 
Europeans. 



Commission quarters to the number of 
1,296 were occupied by families of gold em- 
ployes, while 3,433 gold employes occupied 
bachelor quarters. One thousand and thirty 
nine married quarters were occupied bv 
West Indian laborers, while 7,363 West In- 
dians occupied bachelor quarters. European 
laborers and their families occupied 31S 
married quarters, and bachelor quarters 
were occupied by 5,561- European laborers. 
At the end of August applications for family 
quarters for employes who entered the serv- 
ice after January 1, 1908, were on file, as 
follows: Cristobal, 60; Gatun, 21 ; Taber- 
nilla, 1; Gorgona, 53; ,San Pablo, 8; Bas 
Obispo, 3; Las Cascadas, 14; Empire, ii^ 
Culebra, none, all assigned; Paraiso, 6; 
Pedro Miguel, 11; Corozal, 13; Ancon, 15; 
La Boca, 20. 

A statement of the force actuallv at work 
on .Vugust 31, 1908, follows: 









Silver Men. 






DEP.iRTMEKT. 


Gold 
Men. 


Mon- 
thly. 


Artisans. 


European 
I,a borers. 


Wst Indian 
I,aborers . 


Total 
Silver, 


Total 
Gold 
and 




32c. 
and 
over. 


26c. 


40c. 


32c, 


26c, 


20c, 


Silver, 




LViS 1 2.251 

120 \ -SQfi 


4.460 
256 


1,065 
11 


4,245 
245 


384 
27 


1.351 
18 


3,254 
495 


17,010 

1,64S 

787 

165 

1,859 

16 

1 


20.405 


Quartermasters Department 


1 768 


.Subsistence Department 


70 
278 
396 

84 
53 


787 

143 

850 

16 

1 


857 


Department of Civil .administration 


22 
182 












443 


Department of Sanitation 




IS 





5 


807 


2,2,i5 


Disbursements 






Examiner of Accounts 










54 
















Totals ^... 


4,396 


4.644 


4,920 


1.076, 


4.505 


411 


1,374 


4,556 


21.486 


25,882 



aged 100 feet a day throughout the mile and 
a quarter of machete work and excavating. 

Tlie railway track through the swamp has 
always caused trouble in the wet season b> 
settling, but on July 30, 1907, under the in- 
creased number of trains, and the additional 
weight of the fill for the second track, the 
settlement was the worst on record. Three 
hundred feet of double track embankment, 
with both tracks, sinking about twelve feet. 
Two pile drivers were used to drive a tre.stle 
across the break, and traflfic was resumed on 
the morning of August 1. forty-two hours 
after the trouble occurred. On September 
20 foUowin.g, two hundred feet more of the 
track settled in the same manner immediately 
south of the first break, and was replaced 
with trestle after fort\' hour's interruption of 
traffic. This trestle, 500 feet long, known 
as Bridge 28'/2, has held up well, and has 
.given no sign of weakness, but during the 
early part of the present wet season the em- 
bankment carryin.g the second main track 
settled cotisiderably, farther south, for about 
500 feet each side of Bridge 29. It was de- 
cided that, rather than to impose additional 
wei.ght upon the swamp by placing ballast 
to raise this track, it would be advisable to 
operate a gauntlet over this stretch .similar 
to that operated across Barbacoas Bridge, 
trains being controlled by automatic electric 
signals. This gauntlet track was completed 
and put into service on September 3, 

While it is thought prudent to limit the 
speed of the trains to verv slow movement 
across the Black Swamp, there is no danger 
to the safety of passengers. 

Stages of the Chagres. 

Maximum hei.ght of Cha.gres above low 
water for the week ending midnight, Sep- 
tember 19, 1908 : 







St.\tio> 


s. 








S. 


i 




















i: 


s 


A 


3 
















> 


< 


o 


P3 . 


O 


Height of low water 












above mean sea 












level, feet. - 


129 


92 


46 








Maximum height ab. 












low water, feet: 












Sunday, Sept. . 13... 


3.00 


2.70 


6.20 


10,72 


4.10 


Mondav. Sept. 14.... 


6.75 


5.57 


7.70 


11,36 


4.40 


Tuesday, Sept. 15... 


4.50 


3.00 


5.25 


8,95 


4.00 


Wedn'sday, Sept. 16 


2.00 


3.12 


5.40 


8,68 


2.99 


Thursday, Sept. 17. 


6.50 


5.37 


7.10 


10.18 


3.38 


Friday, Sept. IS 


7,30 


5.85 


7.90 


10.82 


3.90 


Saturday. Sept. 19.. 


2,90 


3.35 


5.S0 


9.80 


3.80 


Maximum for week.. 


7.50 


5.S5 


7.90 


11.36 


4.40 



77 



Rainfall, September 1 to 19, 190S, I 
sive. 

(midnight to .midnight.) 

Maximum 

Station.s. in 

one day, 

Atlantic Division — 

Cristobal ,84 

Brazos Brook 1,03 

G.itnn 1,21 

Bohio 1,65 

Central Division — 

Tabemilla 2,00 

San Pablo 1,84 

Bis Obispo ,79 

Gamljoa .56 

Empire 1.10 

Camacho 1,S5 

Culebra 2.27 

Rio Grande 3.26 

Pacific Division — 

Pedro Migruel .58 

Ua Boca .90 

Ancon .63 

Upper Chagres. 

Alhajuela 2.16 



Total. 



5.65 
5.68 
5,04 
4..56 



5.57 
4.73 
4.35 
5.68 
7.02 
8.41 
10.48 

3.00 
3.56 
3.12 



THE CANAL RECORD 



27 



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS. 

Acting Chairmao and Chief Engineer. 

Circular No. 20S. 

I,ieut.-Col. H. F. Hodges will be in charge of the 
work as Acting Chairman and Chief Engineer dur- 
ing niv absence. Eflfective September 22. 190S. 

Geo. W. Goethals, 
ChaiJ-man ami Chief Engineer. 
Cnlcbra, September 21. 190S. 

Assignments to Duty. 

Circular No. 1S3 i. 

Lieut.-Col. H. F. Hodges. Corps of Engineers. U. S. 
Army, is assigned to duty as Assistant Chief Engi- 
neer. 

Civil Engineer H. H. Rousseau. V. S. Navy, is as- 
signed to duty as Assistant to the Chief Engineer. 

Mr. S. E. Williamson is appointed Division Engi- 
neer of the Pacific Division. 

Geo. \V. Goethals. 
Chainnan and Chief Engineer. 

Cnlebra. C. Z.. September 16. 19CiM. 

Division of Work— Offl^-e of the Chairman 
and Chief Engineer. 

Circular No. 1S3j. 

For the transaction of business in the Department 
of Construetion and Engineering, the following di- 
visions of the office are designated: 

First Division, under I.,ieut.-Col. H. F. Hodges, 
U. S. Army. Assistant Chief Engineer: He will have 
charge of the design of locks, dams, regulating 
works and their accessories ; and the forces engaged 
on such designs, including the mechanical and elec- 
trical engineer, will report to him direct. All papers 
relating to those works, including projects from di- 
\-ision engineers, requisitions, specifications, bids, 
etc.. for plant and material to be used in construc- 
tion, will be referred to him for consideration and 
comment. He will exercise general supen-ision over 
the engineering work, and over the forces engaged 
thereon, with a view to securing uniform rates of pay 
for similar duties in the various construction divi- 
sions. 

Second Divisio7i, under Civil Engineer H, H. 
Rousseau. U. S. Navy. Assistant to the Chief Engi- 
neer: He will exercise supervision over the Di\'ision 
of Motive Powerand Machinery, and will have charge 
of— 

1. Office drafting force, including the office engi- 
neer and the architect. 

2. The preparation of estimates, of allotments of 
appropriated funds, and of statements of funds avail- 
able. 

3. The preparation and compilation of cost keeping 
and technical data. 

All papers relating to the various machine shops of 
the Commission, including manufacturing orders, 
requisitions, specifications, bids, etc.. to Building 
Construction and to Municipal Engineering will be 
referred to him for consideration and comment. In 
order to secure a uniform wage scale, all applications 
for authority for promotions and employments in the 
various machine shops will be referred to him for 
action. 

Third Division, under Mr. CM. Saville. Assist- 
ant Engineer: He will have charge of all matters 
referring to general sur\'eys not properly belonging 
to any one division; of the collection and compilation 
of all data connected with meteorology and river hy- 
draulics, and of such investigations, tests and ex- 
periments as may be assigned to him. 

Fourth Division, under Mr. INI. B. DePutron, As- 
sistant to the Chairman: In addition to his other 
duties, he will have charge of the personnel records 
of the Commission and the Panama Railroad Com- 
missary, and will act on all applications for leave of 
absence, sick leave, etc.. and. except as designated 
elsewhere, on all applications for promotions and ap- 
pointments, to see that such comply with the author- 
ized positions and rates of pay. He will also exer- 
cise supervision over the clerical organizations on 
the Isthmus, with a view to securing uniformity in 
pay for similar clerical work. 

All communications will be addressed to the Chief 
Engineer. The Chief Dlerk, in addition to his other 
duties, will receive all official mail and, after having 
it recorded, will distribute it to the various assistants 
as outlined above. 

The assistants will send direct to the Chief Engi- 
neer for final action all papers referred to them for 
consideration and comment. 

Geo. W. Goethals, 
Chaiinnan and Chief Engineer. 

Culebra, C. Z.. September 18, 190S. 



H. Rousseau. Assistant to the Chief Engineer, will 
perform the duties of Division Eugineer of the Di\'i- 
sion of Meteorology and River Hydraulics. 

Geo. W. Goethals. 
Chaiitnan and Chief Engineer. 
Culebra. September 17. 190S. 

Headquarters of Subsistence Department. 

CiRcrL.\K No. 201. 

The head Quarters of the Subsistence Department 
of the Isthmian Canal Commission will, on Septem- 
ber 16, 1903. be moved from Culebra, C. Z.. to Cristo- 
bal. C. z. 

Hereafter all bills receivable, bills payable, and 
other correspondence pertaining to the Commissary 
Department. Panama Railroad, will be sent direct to 
the Subsistence Officer. Cristobal. Canal Zone. 
Geo. W. Goethals. 
Chairman and Chiej Engineer. 

Culebra, C. Z.. September 15. 190S. 



Acting Division Engineer, Atlantic Divi- 
sion. 

Circular No. 207. 

Maj. Chester Harding will, on his return from 
leave of absence, perform the duties of Acting Di\n- 
sion Engineer of the Atlantic DiWsion during the 
absence on leave of Maj. Wm. I,. Sibert. 

Geo. W, Goeth.\ls. 
Chairtnan and Chief Engineer, 
Culebra. September 21. 190S. 



Circular. 

During my absence on leave in the States Maj. J. 
P. Jen-ey will act as Division Engineer until the re- 
turn of Maj. Chester Harding. Assistrmt Division 
Engineer, who. upon reporting for duty, will assume 
the duties and title of Acting Di\-ision Engineer. 
Wm. I.,. Sibert, 
Division Engineer. 
Gatun, C. Z., September 17, 190S. 



Purchasing Agent on the Isthmus. 

Circular No. 205. 

Effective this date : Capt. Courtland Nixon is ap- 
pointed Purchasing Agent on the Isthmus, in addi- 
tion to the other duties assigned him by the Chief 
Quartermaster. 

Geo. W. Goethals. 
Chai>-r7taii. 
Culebra. September 19, 190S. 



LfOcal Purchases by Subsistence Officer 

Circular No. 203. 

Subject to the approval of the Commission. Maj 
Eugene T. Wilson. Subsistence Officer, is authorized 
to make daily local purchases for the hotels and mess 
houses in the open market without advertising, such 
purchases, singly, or in any one day, in no instance 
to exceed 5500 in value. 

Geo. W. Goethals. 

Chai7'man. 

Culebra. C. Z.. September 17. 1908. 



Ac'lng Claim Officer. 

Circular No. 209. 

During the absence on leave of Mr. Benj. I^. Ja- 
cobson. effective September 23, 1908. Mr. Frank X. 
Ward will perform the duties of Claim Officer. 

Geo. W. Goethals. 
Chairman. 
Culebra. September 21, 190S. 

Manufacture in Shops to Be Reduced. 

Circula« No. 206. 

For reasons of economy it is desired to reduce the 
manufacture of repair parts, castings, and other sim- 
ilar material, in the Commission shops on the Isth- 
mus, to a minimum, and to make purchases in the 
United States whenever the necessities of the work 
will permit, exception being made only in cases 
where the circumstances clearly indicate the econo- 
my of doing the work on the Isthmus. Future needs 
should be anticipated as much as possible, and re- 
quests should be made on the Quartermaster's De- 
partment to keeD up the stock of all articles regularly 
needed, the aim being to secure the greatest economy 
practicable. 

Each department and division should exercise 
close super\'ision over its own manufacturing work 
in order to see whether same can be reduced. For 
manufacturing requests between departments and 
divisions, on Form No. 159, it shall be the duty of the 
department or division receiving such manufacturing 
request to make comparison of estimate of cost of 
manufactitre on the Isthmus with cost of purchase in 
the United States, and. in cases where there is a ma- 
terial difference in favor of the latter procedure, to 
notify the department or division requesting the 
work of the results of this comparison, sending a 
copy of same to the Chief Engineer's office. I'pon 
receipt of this i nformation such action on the lines 
of economy will be taken by the department or di\'i- 
sion issuing the request as the circumstances indi- 
cate. 

Geo. W. Goethals. 
Chairman and Chief Engineet . 

Culebra. September 18. 1908. 



Division of Meteorology and River Hy- 
draulics. 

Circular No. 204. 

During the absence on leave of Mr. Ricardo M. 
Arango. and until further notice. Civil Engineer H. 



Acting Surveying Officer. 

Circular No. 202. 

Mr. H. S. Farish is appointed acting surveying offi- 
cer, effective this date. 

Geo. W. Goethals. 
Chairynan. 
Culebra. C. Z., September 15. 1908. 



Acting Executive Secretary. 

Circular No. 80. 

During the absence on leave of Mr. H. D. Reed, 
Executive Secretary. Mr. George A. Ninas is desig- 
nated as Acting Executive Secretarj'. 

Jo C. S. Blackburn, 
Head of Department of Civil Administration. 
Ancon, September 18. 1908. 
Approved: 

Geo. W. Goethals, 

Chairtnan of the Commission. 



Mail for Quartermaster's Department 

Heads of Dep.\rtments and Divtsioxs : 

Effective September 16: Please send all mail for- 
merly addressed to the Chief of Division of Material 
and Supplies, and latterly to the Assistant Chief 
Quartermaster, Cristobal, as follows : 

Address all general correspondence relative to ma- 
terial to the Chief Quartermaster. Culebra. 

All inquiries regarding material on order in the 
United States should he addressed to the Chief Quar- 
termaster. Culebra. 

Send all accomplished inspection calls and corre- 
spondence relating thereto to the Chief Quartermas- 
ter, Culebra. 

Send all States' requisitions to Chief Quartermaster, 
Culebra. 

Send all requisitions to be filled from stock at 
Mount Hope to the Depot Quartermaster. Mount 
Hope, and address all inquiries concerning such de- 
liveries to the same place. 

Return store invoices issiied by the office of the As- 
sistant Chief Quartermaster. Cristobal, to the Depot 
Quartermaster, Mount Hope, and so address all cor- 
respondence pertaining thereto. 

Storekeepers will return all accomplished store in- 
voices to the Depot Quartermaster. Cristobal. 
Respectfully. 

C. A. Devol, 
Chief Quartermaster. 

Culebra. C. Z.. September 15. 1908. 



Personal. 

I/ieut.-Col. Geo. W. Goethals sailed on 
the United Fruit steamer Cartago for New 
Orleans on Tuesday, September 22, for a 
visit of six weeks to the States. 

Commissioner William L. Sibert sailed 
for the States on the Esperanza, September 
18, on his regular leave of absence. 



steamship Colon. 

The steamship Colon of the Panama Rail- 
way Steamship lyiue, arrived at Cristobal on 
Friday, September IS, two days late. She 
encountered a hurricane north of Watlings 
Island on Sunday, September 12, which 
continued for 30 hours. She lost one of her 
smokestacks, three life boats, and suffered 
other damage to her superstructure. Three 
seamen were asphyxiated b}- ammonia gas 
while making repairs to the cold storage 
plant. All necessary repairs were made in 
time for her to sail for the States on her 
scheduled time to-day. 



Rev. Henry Collins, Commission chaplain, 
will speak in the Roman Catholic church 
at Gorgona at 9.30 o'clock Sunday morning, 
September 27, in the interest of the church 
of the Holv Redeemer, Culebra. 



The regular dance of the Tivoli Club will 
be held at the Hotel Tivoli September 26. 



28 



T!HE CANAL RECORD 



CANAL WORK FOR AUGUST. 

Munthly Report of the 'Cliairttian to the 
Secretary of War. 

Culel.)ra, September 17, 1908. 

rill- Hanoinbl,-. 
Tin' Sfc/vtary o/ li-'ar. 
tl'asliinsfoii . D. C. 

Sir: I have the honor to submit the fol- 
lowing report of operations on the Isthmus 
for the month of August, 1908: 

The work of reorganization, as outlined 
in my report for July was continued. Effec- 
tive .\ugTist 1, the Division of Building Con- 
struction and the Division of Municipal 
Engineering were abolished, and the duties 
formerly performed by the divisions were 
assigned to the Atlantic, Central and Pacific 
Divisions in their respective territories. 
Department of Construction and Engi- 
neering, 

The following table summarizes the prin- 
cipal items of construction work, accom- 
plished by the Atlantic, Central and Pacific 
Divisons during the month: 



VO ^ 



1/1 O to CN 



3E; 



\o o (sa \o a\ 

OOO \OOv 



CM t-. --H 



—I " r*o O CO 



































>, P^ 


>, 


?-. >^ 


>. -^ 


o y 


u 


o o 


u u 










'SB 


^ 


33 


33 


S 3 




3 S 


S S 











S • : :'H'H i'H : i ; ! i : 

^i : • ■ rt rt . d - . . . . • 

rj ■ ; \ >, >> fi >, '_ • ■ • ■ ^ 

'. fi t/] (J u'v U '^ '■ '■ '■ '■ ^ 



''Ct: 

! 0.x 



:H 

: \) 

•— "w - 

hi 



■5S 
o o 






- = "■21-°' 

y~ £ ■" 1- K 
5 .s o - 1; g 



B 2- >z 



■ *^ f J .- -! S *^ 









Atlantic Division. 

G.\TUN IvOCK.S. 

Four steam shovels were at work on the 
Lock site during the month, and a total of 
132,263 cubic yards of material were exca- 
vated. Of this material, 26,953 cubic yards 
were dumped in the Dam and 10.S,213 cubic 
\ards outside of the Dam. 

The position of the power house has been 
staked out, and the necessarj- triangulation 
work has been completed for locating the 
cement house dock. 

GATUN DAM. 

Dredge No. 82 removed during the month 
from the channel way to the handling plant 
docks, 51,505 cubicyards. Thirty-five thou- 
sand one hundred cubic yards of Bas Obispo 
rock were placed on the south toe of the 



Dam, and 41,050cubicyardsof material from 
the s])illway were dumped on the north toe 
of the Dam. 

SPIHWAY. 

Three steam shovels worked throughout 
the month on the spillway, and a total of 
57,999 Qubic yards was excavated. 

MINDI. 

A total of 16,309 cubic yards was exca- 
vated from the Canal prism by the one 
steam shovel working there. 

Five hundred and nineteen Oliver dump 
cars and 563 Western dump cars of material 
excavated from Min<li were dumped on the 
south toe of the Dam. 

PORTO BELLO. 

Work was activel) and satisfactorily car- 
ried on in preparation for the installation of 
the rock crushing and shipping plant. 

NOMBRE DE DIGS. 

The investigations and surveys of sand de- 
posits were completed and camp broken 
August 21. 

DREDGES. 

Five dredges were at work during the 
month and excavated a total of 638,217 cu- 
bic yards. 

CRISTOBAL. 

At the machine shop and drydock the 
usual general work was accomplished, in- 
cluding miscellaneous repairs to dredges, 
tugs and clapets. The installation of ma- 
chinery in 20-inch pipe-line dredge No. 85 
was 95 per cent completed at the end of the 
month. Work was completed riveting the 
hull of the stern wheel towboat, and all of 
the material on hand was erected. 

The parties engaged in dismantling the 
old French dred,ges near Frijoles progressed 
rapidlj- during the month and the dredges 
are prepared to come out at the first high 
water. 

MUNICIPAL ENGINEERING. 

One thousand four hundred feet of the 
Mount Hope-Oatun road, from the fire sta- 
tion at Gatun toward New Ga tun, were mac- 
adamized during the month. 

Other work, consisting of the mainte- 
nance of roads, installation of sewers and 
water pipes, was accomplished during the 
month. 

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION. 

Twenty-one houses at Gatun, including 
the hotel, were screened during the month. 

One tj'pe 14 house was completed, two 
more are 90 per cent completed, and three 
are 30 per cent completed. 

The powder house at Mindi was com- 
pleted, and work on the stora.ge magazine 
at Mindi Hills was about 70 per cent com- 
pleted. Work on this magazine is expected 
to be finished by September 25. 

At Cri.stobal, six washhouses and closets 
at Folks River were completed. House No. 
3 at Cristobal was demolished preparatory 
to the erection of a new house. Two type 
14 houses are 85 per cent completed. 

The storehouse for the Quartermaster's 
Department is 90 per cent completed, and 
the Cristobal jail is 85 per cent completed. 
Central Division. 

During the month of August, the total 
amount of material excavated in the Central 
Division was 1,540,610 cubicyards, of which 
530,153 cubic yards were classified as earth 
and 1,010,457 cubic yards as rock. 

Of this quantit}' 1, 534, 498cubic yards were 



removed by steam shovels and 6,112 cubic 
yards from the quarry at the Bas Obispo 
rock crusher by hand. 

The quantity of material removed from the 
Canal prism was 1,499,963 cubic yards, and 
in addition 38,774 cubic yards were removed 
from the Obispo Diversion and 1,873 cubic 
yards from new incline in Gorgona district. 

The daily average number of steam shovels 
at work during the month was the same as 
for the month of Juh'. The average number 
of steam shovels days was also the same. 

For comparison with work done during 
the corresponding month of the previous 
3'ear in the area embraced in the Central 
Division, the following table has been pre- 
pared: 





o»i 


Classifi- 
cation 




a St3 

U rt r. 


bt 




mount 
rial ex 
by ste 
=ls 


of ma- 
terial 


No. of ste 
ovels wor 
ring mou 
g days in 




•c 


1 


"a SJ > 


^ 


JS 


■2g 

•ii 


•c 


la^-S 


•A 






> > w 


b; 


tH 


ai 


W 


< 


fi 


< 


OS 


1907. 


cu. yds. 


% 


% 






cu. lids. 


ins. 


AUEfUSt . 


783,173 


62 38 


39.90 


27 


726 


11.24 


1908. 
















August . 


1.534.498 


66 


34 I 52.58 


26 


1,123 


8.11 



From this table it will be noted that the 
amount of material excavated by steam 
shovels in the Central Division in August, 
1908, was nearly double that removed from 
the same section of the Canal in August, 

1907, but it should be remembered that at 
the latter date excavation had just been 
commenced in what is now the Chagres sec- 
tion of the Central Division, 1875 cubic yards 
having been excavated by steam shovels. 

The average output per shovel per day 
was nearly 54 per cent greater in August, 

1908, than in the corresponding month of 
the preceding year. 

During the month the following drilling 
was accomplished. 

By steam and air drills 142.769 feet 

By well or chum drills: .... 92,953 feet 
By hand drills 11,348 feet 



.\ total of 247,070 feet or 47.76 miles. 

No channelers were in operation during 
the month. 

The output of the Bas Obispo rock crusher 
for the month was 9,482 cubic yards, and 
of the Rio Grande crusher, 6,839 cubic yards. 
During the month 13.75 miles of new 
track were laid and 7.07 miles of old track 
removed. 

Pacitic Division. 
DISTRICT NO. 1— LOCKS AND DAMS. 

Excavation — During the month 134,142 
cubic yards of material were excavated, as 
follows: 22,217 cubic yards from the Pedro 
Miguel Lock site, 91,440 cubic yards from 
the Mirafiores Lock site, 2,808 cubic yards 
from the west dam at Mirafiores, and 17,665 
cubic j'ards from the Canal prism at Carde- 
nas Hill. 

G eneral Remarks — The dump west of the 
Pedro Miguel Lock site was extended so as 
to divert the Rio Grande from its natural 
bed throu.gh the Lock site to a channel about 
800 feet west, originall}' excavated by the 
French. A djke was also completed at the 
south end, in which a culvert was olaced 
for drainage. The site is, therefore, fully 
protected from flood water. 

Spur tracks from the main line into the 
Lock prism were begun and are well under 



THE CANAL RECORD 



29 



way. The object of these is to cut in two 
additional steam shovels. 

At Miraflores, the greater portion of the 
material excavated was used in building em- 
bankments on both sides of the Lock site for 
the erection plant, forming toes for the west 
dam between which material will be pumped, 
and in building basins on the east side of the 
site into which the suction dredge will pump 
a portion of the material to be excavated. 

Surveys and examinations, consisting of 
borings and test pits, were made at the pro- 
posed site for the power house, and the site 
for fuel oil tanks located and prepared. 

The setting of machinery at the Cocoli 
shop and the erection of the power trans- 
mission line are in progress. 

With the material excavated from the Ca- 
nal prism at Cardenas Hill, a dyke is being 
built on the east side of the prism which 
will extend from Cardenas to Diablo, a dis- 
tance of approximately 15,000 feet, and be- 
hind which the material dredged from the 
channel will be pumped. 

DISTRICT NO. 2 — DREDGING AND LA BOCA 
SHIPWAY. 

Dredging — Three dredges have been op- 
erated during the month as follows: 



Dredge 


Type. 


Cubic yards. 


Remarks. 


Inpr'm Auxil'y 


Culebra 
Gopher 
No. 14.. 


Suction 
Ladder 
Ladder 


431.296 

161.583 

144.890 


Scow measurement 
Place measurement 
Place measurement 


Total. 


737.774! 





Extensive general and minor repairs were 
made to dredges, clapets, barges, tugs, and 
other plant and equipment. 

A force has been employed in clearing the 
line of the Canal over which the dredges 
will operate between L,a Boca and Miraflores. 
The amount of work accomplished during 
the past month is as follows: Clearing, 
piling, and burning brush over an area of 
4,347,850 square feet; grubbing, piling and 
burning stumps over an area of 1,047,000 
square feet; and blasting 17,100 stumps. 

Borings are in progress to determine ac- 
curately the character and amount of exca- 
vation in the channel between Miraflores 
and La Boca. 

A survey of the dredged channel was com- 
pleted and the areas computed to obtain a 
check on the monthly progress reports. 
Following are the results obtained: 

Summation of monthly estimates 

June 1, 1907, to September 1, 190S. 

(15 months) 6,548,600 cu. yds. 

Estimates made from results of 

sur\'ey 6,067.752 cu. yds. 

Shortage of place measurement. 
September 1 . 1908 4S0,S4S cu. yds. 

The discrepancy is about 7.3 per cent, and 
is thought to be largely due to the refilling 
of the channel from cross currents, which has 
been previously estimated at from 600,000 to 
1,000,000 cubic yards per annum. The dis- 
crepancy shown above amounts to 384,572 
cubic yards per annum. 

DISTRICT NO. 3 — MUNICIPAL ENGINEERING 
AND BUILDINGS. 

Panama Improvements — Work on avenue 
B extension was continued. The sewer and 
water installation and concrete curbs and 
gutters have been completed. At present 
this street is about 70 percent completed. 

The maintenance of roads, streets and 
sewers was continued during the month, 
and a number of minor items of construction 



accomplished at the different stations in this 
division. 

Building Section— \ large amount of build- 
ing work was accomplished during the 
month in the Pacific Division, including of- 
fice buildings, quarters, mess halls, shops, 
and other buildings. Necessary repairs and 
maintenance of existing buildings were at- 
tended to. 

MECHANICAL DIVISION. 

The usual work was performed in this di- 
vision in connection with the maintenance 
and operation of equipment, electrical work 
and manufacture of repair parts. 

The following shows the progress made 
in the installation of tanks for the storage of 
fuel oil. 

Rio Grande. 2500-bbl. tank.. completed 

Las Cascadas, secondary tank.. 33 per cent completed 

Empire. 4000-bbl. tank 95 per cent completed 

Empire, secondary tank 40 per cent completed 

Bowling Green t Empire) . 1000- 

bbl. tank 80 percent completed 

Gorgona, secondary tank 100 per cent completed 

Miraflores, 4000-bbl. tank 5 per cent completed 

The boiler plant at Las Cascadas air com- 
press >r is now burning fuel oil instead of 
coal. 

Division of Meteorology and River Hy- 
draulics. 

The usual observations and measurements 
were continued during the month and no 
nnusual meteorological conditions occurred. 

Relocation of Panama Railroad. 
CONNECTING TRACKS FROM OPERATED LINES. 

Twelve hundred and seventy-eight linear 
feet of temporary track were recovered from 
Spur No. 2, at Gatun. 

Seven hundred and forty-six linear feet of 
track were laid on Spur No. 7, at Caimito. 

Five hundred and forty-eight linear feet 
of temporary track were recovered from Spur 
No. 15, at Gatun. 

One hundred and twenty-five linear feet 
of trestle and 180 linear feet of temporary 
track were laid on Spur No 16, at south end 
of Miraflores tunnel. 

GRADING. 

Excavation — 

Total to date — Total current month— 

Cu.yds. Cu. yds 

375,963 earth 22.7S1 earth 

69,990 loose rock 5,760 loose rock 

82,745 solid rock 3.774 solid rock 

,~- 52S,698 totill 32.315 total 

Embankment — 

Total to date— Total current month — 
Cu. yds. Cu. yds. 

595.974 from excavation 36,666 from excavation 

1,693,470 from Canal 38,796 from Canal 

2,289.444 total 75,462 total 

TRESTLES FOR FILLING. 

Six hundred and ninety-five linear feet of 
trestle were driven from the relocated line 
near station 1090 opposite Mamei. 

Seven hundred linear feet of trestle were 
driven on the relocated line near station 
1190 opposite Juan Grande. 

BRIDGES AND CULVERTS. 

A 16-inch vetrified clay pipe culvert 195 
feet long was placed at station 1085 — 35 
opposite Mamei, 18 cubic \-ards of concrete 
being used in foundation. 

Thirty-two feet of galvanized iron pipe 
were placed at station 1195 and 142 feet of 
36-inch galvanized iron pipe at station 1141— 
47 opposite Juan Grande, 50 cubic yards of 
concrete being used in foundation. 

A 2 by 3 standard rail top box culvert was 



placed at station 1091 opposite Mamei, 41.5 
cubic yards of concrete being used.^ 
MIR.AFLORES TUNNEL. 

One hundred and thirty cubic yards of 
concrete was placed in lining at north end 
of tunnel and 475 cubic yards of concrete at 
south end. 

The hill has broken about 50 feet north 
of the crest and has moved to the south 
about three feet. The movement along the 
east side has been considerably more marked 
than along the west side, but the arch cen- 
ters have moved more at the top than they 
have at either the east or west end. The 
movement has been more about 130 feet in 
from the south end than at any other place 
—for a stretch of 25 feet at this place the 
tunnel lining has moved enough to practi- 
cally upset the arch centers, and the roof is 
supported by longitudinal pieces 12 by 12 
under the key pieces of the arch, the longi- 
tudinal pieces being supported by posts. 
The break that shows on top is about 150 
feet farther north than where the first dis- 
turbance is shown inside, indicating that 
the side hill is slipping on a rock surface 
which has a dip of about 45 degrees. 

A concrete retaining wall 10 feet wide at 
the base and 100 feet long has been built 
and Bas Obispo rock back filling placed at 
the south end of the tunnel, at the toe of the- 
slide, to check same. This wall is so located 
that it will become the east side of the tun- 
nel lining, the tunnel being lengthened 100 
feet by the building of this wall. 
PERMANENT TR.\CKS. 

Fourteen hundred and thirty-three linear 
feet of permanent track were laid this month, 
making a total of 40,745 feet to date. 

GENERAL. 
The force of laborers during the month 
averaged 894. 

Quartermaster's Department. 

There were received during the month 320 
European laborers and 296 West Indians. 
There was a surplus of labor during the 
month, so that it became very difficult to 
place incoming laborers, and all recruiting 
has been ordered suspended until further 
notice. 

The total additions to the gold force dur- 
ing the month were 252, and the total sepa- 
rations 330, so that the net separations were 
78. The total gold force of the Commission 
at the end of August was 4,396, as compared 
with 4,447 at the end of July. There was a 
.slight increase in the silver force, the total 
at the end of August having been 21,486, as 
compared with 21,049 at the end of July. 

During the month of August preparations 
went forward for the taking over b\' the 
Quartermaster's Department of the Division 
of Material and Supplies, of certain work 
heretofore performed by the Sanitar\- Depart- 
ment, and for inaugurating a system of cor- 
rect accounting for Commission propertj- on 
the Isthmus. It is believed that by the end 
of September a practical and economical 
working basis will have been reached. 
Subsistence Department. 

The net profit in August for the operation 
of hotels and mess houses, not including the 
Tivoli Hotel, was $3,889.55 as compared 
with a net loss in July of $2,559.47, making 
a net gain over the previous month of 
$6,449.02. 

The operation expenses of the Hotel Tivoli 



30 



THE CANAL RECORD 



were >19,157.21, and the revenue amounted 
to 518,119.18, making a net lossof Sl>038.03. 

Depnrtraent of Civil Admiulstratioti. 

COURTS. 

The Supreme Court was in session twice 
during the month. No criminal cases were 
filed. One was disposed of, and three crim- - 
inal cases were pendin.^ at the end of the 
month. 

In the circuit courts, eii^dit civil cases and 
thirty-two criminal cases were heard and 
disposed of, and in the district courts twenty- 
three civil and four hundred and seventy- 
seven criminal cases were disposed of. 
DIVISION OF RICVENUHS. 

The jjeneral revenues of the Canal Zone 
for the month collected by this division 
amounted to $11,047.11. 

Thirteen vessels entered at and twelve 
cleared from the port of Ancon, and twenty- 
two vessels entered at and twenty-one cleared 
from the port of Cristobal. 

DIVISION OF POLICE AND PRISONS. 

During the month 4SS arrests were made, 
as compared with 536 for July. No disturb- 
ances of a serious nature occurred during 
the month. 

As Coroner of the Canal Zone, the Chief 
of Police investigated ten deaths; four of 
which were due to accidental drowning, two 
to railroad accidents and one to suicide, 
DIVISION OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

The usual business of this division was 
conducted during the month, including the 
installation of new connections, the issu- 
ance of permits for the installation of plumb- 
ing, the collection of water rents, and in- 
spection of plumbing and sewers. 

Durinj^ the month 28,714,000 gallons of 
water were used in the city of Panama, and 
27,335,671 gallons in the city of Colon. 

DIVISION OF FIRK PROTECTION. 
Seven fires were reported in the Canal 
Zone during the month, endangering prop- 
erty valued approximately SI 10, 500, the 
estimated actual loss being $205. 

DIVISION OF SCHOOI.S. 
No schools were opened during the month 

Department of Sanitation. 
[The report in full of the Chief Sanitary 
Officer was published in The Ca.nal Rec- 
ord of September 16.] 

Respectfully, 

Geo. W. Goeth.\ls, 

Chaitynati and Chiej Eiisineer. 

Kxamination for Physician, 

A local examination for the position of 
phvsician in the service of the Isthmian Ca- 
nal Commission, entrance salary ^^l.SOO per 
annum, will be held October 14, 1908, at 9 
a. m. in the office of the Chairman. Culebra. 
The Manual of Examinations, containing all 
necessary information and Application Form, 
may be obtained from the Secretary of the 
Isthmian Civil Service Board, office of the 
Chairman, Culebra, Canal Zone. 



The burglar, who has been entering build- 
ings in the Zone by cutting his way through 
the floors from underneath, was captured by 
the Canal Zone police on September 2, and 
on September 14 pleaded guilty in the cir- 
cuit court at Ancon and was sentenced to 
one year in Culebra penitentiary. 

All mail for the Acting Surveying Officer 
should be addressed in care of the Chief 
Quartermaster. Culebra, C. Z. 



PROPERTY ACCOUNTING. 

New Methodlnstituted by Quartermaster's 
Department, 

Office of thu Cnirr ui'arti:hmaster. 
ISTHMIAN Canal Commission. 
Culebra, Canal Zone, September IS, 190H. 

Circular No. 1. 

authority. 

Under aMthority of the Secretary of War. dated 
August 26. I'-OS. and in compliance with Circular No. 
183h. of the Chairman uf the Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission, dated Autrust 27. 190S. the foUowiuij instruc- 
tions are published for the information and guidance 
of all concerned. 

general instructions. 

1. Accouutahility and responsibility devolve upon 
any person to whom public property is entrusted and 
who is required to make returns therefor. Respon- 
sibility without accountability devolves upon one to 
whom such property is entrusted, but who is not re- 
quired to make returns therefor. An accountable 
official is relieved from responsibility for property for 
which he holds a proper memorandum receipt. A 
responsible official is not relieved from responsibility 
for public property for which he has given a memo- 
randum receipt until he has returned the property to 
tlie accountable official, or has secured memorandum 
receipt from his successor. 

2. A transfer of public property involves a change 
of possession and accountability. 

3. In ordinary cases of transfer, the transferring 
official will fiiniish the receiving official with combi- 
nation form, invoices and receipts, which will be pre- 
pared in quinturlicatf. Two invoices and two re- 
ceipts will be for^varded to the receiving official, and 
one invoice retained by the invoicing official as a ref- 
erence pending the return of receipts. The account- 
able official upon receipt and verification of the prop- 
erty will sign two receipts and return to the invoicing 
official, which will be fiis nuthority for dropping the 
property. The invoices will be retained by the offi- 
cial receiving the property, and will be disposed of 
as follows: one copy lo accompany return at end of 
period, the other to be retained to support the offi- 
cial's retained papers. The receipt will he handl'-d 
in a like manner by the official transferring the 
property Invoice niu^^t invariably accompany prop- 
erty, and be for\varded the same day as property 
is shipped. In cases where complete transfer of 
property accountability occurs, and one accountable 
official is relieved by another, invoices and receipts 
will be required, but the official assuming charge 
will certify on his predecessor's final return that the 
property shown as remaining on hand has been re- 
ceived by him. and the transferring official will cer- 
tify that all such property was actually turned over 
by him. In n case of this kind, the property shown 
as remaining on hand, on the return of the official 
being rt-lieved. will be taken up on the return of his 
successor as voucher number one to his return. 

4. When an official to whom property has been for- 
warded believes same to have miscarried he will 
promptly inform the shipper. If an official to whom 
public property has been transferred fails to receipt 
for it within a reasonable time, the invoicing official 
will report the fact to the head of his department or 
division. Should the matter not be adjusted prior to 
the semi-annual period, the invoicing official \^-ill 
take credit on his return and forward certified copies 
of all papers relating to the transaction, in support of 
the entry. 

5. On receipt of public property by an official he 
will make a careful examination to ascertain its 
quality and condition. Should he discover defect or 
shortage he will apply for a survey to determine it 
and fix the responsibility. .Should he consider the 
property unfit for use, he will submit a list of the 
property, in triplicate, on the prescribed form and 
request the action of a surveying official. The same 
rule will be observed in regard to property dam- 
aged or missing while in store. 

6. Thegi\'ing or taking of receipts in blank for pub- 
lic property is prohibited. 

7. Public property will not be used, under any cir- 
cumstances, for any private purpose whatsoever, 
unless so authorized by special aifthorit>- from the 
Chairman and Chief Engineer. 

S. Public property condemned and ordered sold 
will be disposed of for cash at auction, or to the high- 
est bidder on sealed proposals, on due public notice, 
and in such market as the public interest may re- 
quire. The official making the sale will suspend it 
when in his opinion better prices may be obtained. 
The auctioneers certified detailed account of the sale, 
and the vouchers for the expenses attending it. will 
be reported on proper forms to the head of the de- 
partment or division to which the property pertains, 
who will transmit the same to the Disbursing Officer. 
Two copies of the detailed account of the sale will be 
retained by the official accountable for the property 
sold; one copy will be forwarded with his return at 
the end of the period, the other will be filed with his 
retained return. All fuuds accruing from such sales 
will be immediately forwarded lo the Disbursing 
Officer, accompanied by a statement showing date of 
the -sale. 

9. Public property which has been coi:denined, or 
the sale price of which has been reduced as the result 
of a sun'ey or inspection, will not be purchased by 
any official who Avas responsible therefor at the time 
of the condemnation or reduction of price, nor by an 
official who bore any part in any such condemnation 
or reduction. 

10. If any article of public property be lost or dam- 
aged by the neglect or fault of any employe, he shall 



pay the value thereof, or the cost of repairs at such 
nites as may be determined by a sur\-ey of the prop- 
erty. If articles of public property are embezzled, or 
lost, or dnmaeed through neglect, by an employe, 
the value of the damage ns ascertained (and by a sur- 
vey if necessary) shall be charged to him and set 
against any pay or money due him. 

11. When informntion is received that property of 
the Istlimian Canal Commis.sion is luilawfully in the 
possession of any person whomsoever, the Quarter- 
master or other proper official will promptly cause 
proceedings to be institnted'and diligentb' prose- 
cuted in the courts of the Canal Zone for the recovery 
of the i)roperty, and if the same has been stolen, for 
the arrest, trial, conviction and due punishment of 
the oflender and his accomplices. Upon satisfactory 
information that such Isthmian Canal Commission 
property is unlawfully in the possession of any P^ir- 
ties. is likely to be taken away, concealed, or other- 
wise disposed of before the necessary proceedings 
can be had in the courts of the Canal Zone for its 
recovery, aTi>' accountable official ha\-ing knowledge 
of the s.'ime will at once cause the same to be seized 
and will hold it subject to any legal proceedings that 
may be instituted by other parties. Persons caught 
in the act of stealing public property will be summa- 
rily arrested by any employe of the Isthmian Canal 
Commission, and turned over to the proper authori- 
ties for trial. 

Xll All public property, whether paid for or not, 
must be accounted for on the proper returns. All 
pul>Iic property unaccounted for when discovered by 
an accountable official will be taken up and the usual 
returns rendered therefor. .Such property will be 
listed on the proper form, which will accompany the 
return. 

13. An accountable official will have credit for an 
expenditure of property made in compliance with 
instructions from the head of his department or divi- 
sion, or other comjietent authority. If the expendi- 
ture is disallowed, it will be charged to the official 
who ordered the expenditure. Public property ex- 
pended in the ser\ice of the Isthmian Canal Commis- 
sion ^nll be accounted for by the certificate of the 
responsible official. That is, the expenditure voucher 
will be signed by the official expending the supplies. 

14. Should nn accountable official of the Isthmian 
Canal Commission charged with public property fail 
to render the prescribed returns therefor within a 
reasonable time, r settlement of his accounts will be 
made by the Chief Quartermaster and the money 
value of the property witli which he is charged will 
be reported against him to the Disbursing Officer for 
stoppage. In case there is not sufficient pay due him, 
action will be taken against his official bond to re- 
cover the amount charged in excess of pay due. 

15. As soon as possible after the receipt of a return 
by the Chief Quartermaster, it will be examined in 
his office, and the official making the return will be 
notified of all errors and irregularities found therein 
and granted one mouth in wliich to make correction. 
Suspensions and disallowances will not be made on 
account of slight informalities which do not affect 
the validity of a voucher, but the official's attention 
may be called to them. Whenever the errors have 
been corrected or compensation lins been made for 
deficient articles, and the action of the Chief Quarter- 
master is sustained or modified by the Chairman and 
Chief Engineer, the return will be regarded as settled 
and the official who rendered it will be notified ac- 
cordingly. 

SURVEYS ON property. 

Public property which has been damaged, or is 
unsuitable for the service, or eWdence of property 
which has been lost, will be sur\'eyed by a disinter- 
ested official appointed by the Chairman. The sur- 
veying offi.cial must fully investigate matters submi.^ 
ted to him. He will call forall evidence obtainable, 
and will not limit his inquiries to proofs or state- 
ments presented by parties iu interest. He will 
rigidb' scrutinize the evidence, especially in cases of 
alleged theft or embezzlement, and will not recom- 
mend the relief of officials or employes from respon- 
sibility unless fully satisfied that those charged with 
the care of property have performed their whole duty 
in regard to it. He should hear in person or by 
deposition all persons concerned in the subject mat- 
ter before him. 

The person responsible for public property to be 
surveyed will, in all cases, furnish the original 
certificates or affidavits, upon which he relies to be 
relieved from responsibility, together with the duly 
attested copies of such certificates or affidavits that 
are to accompany the report of sun.-ey- Whenever 
loss or destruction of. or damavie lo. public property, 
requiring the action of the surveying official, occurs, 
such action will be requested by the responsible offi- 
cial as soon as practicable, and in everj- ease within 
thirty days after discovery of the loss, destniction. 
or damage, unless exceptional circumstances, which 
will l>e explained by the officials certificates, pre- 
vent such action within that period. 

The sun-eying official can not condemn public 
property, his action being purely ad\-isory. He will 
ascertain and report facts, submitting opinions and 
making recommendations upon questions of respon- 
.sibility which may arise through accident, mistake, 
or neglect. This will include questions invoUing the 
character, amount and cause of damage or deficiency, 
and responsibility for such damage or deficiency; 
also inventories of.property ordered to be abandoned. 
He will also verify discrepancies between invoices 
and the actual property transferred from one official 
to another, ascertaining definitely amounts received, 
for which receiving official must receipt aijd. as far 
as possible, where and how the discrepancy occurred. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



31 



The followingr classes of property may be destroyed 
b3' the sur\'eyinsr officer: 

la) Stores which have become so deteriorated as to 
endanger healtli or injure other stores. 

(b) Un5er\.-iccahle propert\- of no salable value. 
Decision of the sun-eyinji officer will be final as to 
whether such proper tj' has salable value. 

In case the invoice value of any article exceeds 
$500. the approval of the Chairman will be obtained 
before the destruction of the property. 

The sur\-eying officer will certify that propert>- has 
been destroyed in his i>rcsence. The certificate of 
the witnessing- official that the property has been 
destroyed will be api)ended to the original veiJOrt of 
the sur\'eyine officer. 

The repprt of the sun.eyin^' official will be pre- 
pared in triplicate, and will then be submitted to the 
Chief Quartermaster for the approval or dis.ipproval 
of the Chairman. When approved by the Chairman, 
report of the surveyinjr official becomes a proper 
voucher for the relief of ;in official for property ac- 
countability. 

INVKNTOKIES OK PIIOPEUTY. 
All officials accountable or responsible for public 
property shall, prior to October 1, I'^OS. take such 
inveiitories of the propertj- under ilieir control as 
will insure the correct amount for a physical ac- 
counting being er.tered on their return of public 
property on October 1. Immediately after October 1, 
an official or officials as may be designated by the 
Chief Quartermaster and approved by the Chairman. 
will proceed to inventory various articles at r.uidom 
pertaining to accountability of public property on 
the Canal Zone. Wherever a test inventory of cer- 
tain articles gives evidence of any improper record 
of initial accountability as of OMober land subse- 
quent transactions, the entire stock of property per- 
tiining to the official in question will be inventoried. 

EXPEXDirrRE OF PROPERTY. 

A list of expendable property will be approved by 
the Chairman and published for the information of 
all concerned. Property so listed may be expended 
and dropped from the returns on certificate of the 
responsible official that the property has been ex- 
pended in general work pertaining to the construc- 
tion of the Isthmian Canal. (Segregated charge un- 
der proper acconntnumbers pertains to the cost-keep- 
ing report.) All proijerty expendable as wellas non- 
expendable will be properly accounted for and car- 
ried on returns, while it remains in regularly oi-gan- 
ized strrehouses. and until it has passed into the exe- 
cution of the work. 

PROPKKTV RETURNS. 

A property return on form as described under 
"Forms" will be rendered for all property on June 50 
and December 31, of each year. A carbon ^N-ill be 
inserted between original and duplicate, and one 
writing will cover botli original and retained copy of 
this return. Entries v.-ill be made in indelible i>en- 
cil, and not with typewriter, the latter process being 
slow and defeating the siini'Iicit>" of the process. 
All entries appearing on this return to be covered by 
a voucher, unless otherwise provided, and such 
vouchers will be numbered consecutively throughout 
the period which the return covers. It is understood 
that these vouchers are to be numbered consecii- 
lively, recrardless of whether they are iTivoices. re- 
ceipts or expenditures. The return will be rendered 
to the Chief Quartermaster within iwcnty daj's after 
the period has expired for which it is rendered. 

PRICE LIST. 

An annual price list will be prepared by the Chief 
Quartermaster, printed, and issued to accountable 
officers prior to October 1, 190S. This price list will 
govern in the cost keeping account for all properly 
for one year, or imtil such time as fluctuations in 
prices render corrections necessary. The prices of 
certain articles of very large consumption will be 
corrected as often ns proper cost-ketping requires 
such action, and in all cases d\ie notice will be sent to 
accoinitable officials. This price list, and amend- 
ments, will govern absolutely in all financial ac- 
counting pertaining to cost-kecinng. surcharges, 
etc., and no prices will be shown on invoices. 

INVOICES .AXn RECEIPTS. 

All invoices and receipts will be sent from the in- 
voicing official direct to the recpt\-ing official, no copy 
being furiiislied any other official. The combination 
blank, invoice and receipt, I-orin Q.MD 1. will be 
u.sed iu the transfer of all .supplies. 

REOVISITIONS. 

Forms will be prepared in triplicate for all supplies 
required to be purchased in the I'nited States or out- 
side of the CaTial Zone, articles to be arranged there- 
on alphabetica]l> . the distinctive noun to appear 
fir.st. One copy \vill be retained by the official pre- 
paring requisitions : two copies will tie forwarded to 
the Chief Quartermaster, who will make proper de- 
duction for stock on hand, and present them to the 
Chairman for approval. Upon approval, the Chief 
Quartermaster will prepare what is known as United 
States requisition, and forward to the General Pur- 
chasing Officer, Washington. D. C, for purchase; 
one copy of the requisition approved i>y the Chair- 
man to remain in the office of the Chief Quarter- 
master, and one copy to be forwarded to the Mount 
Hope Depot for the information of the Depot Quar- 
termaster. 

\Vhat are known as local requisitions, or requisi- 
tions for supplies already on the Isthmus, will be 
sent tiirect from storehouses. District Quartermasters, 
or Division Engineers, to the Depot Quarterniasterat 
Mount Hope, and filled without reference to the 
Chief Qiiartermaster. 



Requisitions for subsistence stores will be sent di- 
rect to the Cristobal Commissary by Division Kngi- 
neers and the Sanitary Department. 

INSTKI-CTIONS TO APPLY LOCALLY. 
STOREHOUSES. 
Monni Hope Storehouse — To be under tlie direction 
of the Depot Quartermaster, as directed by the 
Chief Quartermaster: to prox-ide an initial account- 
ability of all property received on the Isthmus, and 
to show in its records a physical accounting and 
initial value of all such properly. Invoices from 
Mount Hope for property to fill requisitions will 
invariably be forwarded on the same date the 
property is shipped, or, in other words, accompany 
the property. Property an-i\-iug on the Isthmus 
consigned to the Depot Quartermaster, and which, 
from its nature or economy in transportation, 
requires inspection at points other than Mount Hope, 
will be forwarded to destination, with inspection 
call, whicli will be issued from the office of the Chief 
Quartermaster. This property will then be promptly 
inspected by proper inspectors at destination, and 
the result of such inspection will be recorded on the 
inspection call, which will be returned to Chief 
Quartermaster. The Depot Quartermaster. ISIount 
Hope, will be furnished with two copies of the bill 
and cop.\ of the complete iiispection call. He will 
then take up the bill on his property return, making 
proper i)ink slips for the Purchasing Officer, and in- 
voice to the accountable official, who will have al- 
ready rendered certificate of irispection. 

This will also appl\' to medical stores and supplies 
for the Colon Medical Storehouse, where economy in 
transportation suggests delivery direct instead of 
through Mount Hope. 

The Depot Quartermastt r. Mount Hope, will be the 
Purchasing officer of the Isthmian Canal Commis- 
sion on the Isthmus, a>ul all purchases of supplies 
will be made by him u.'ou requisitions approved by 
the Chief Quartermaster. 

All supplies ijurchased in the United Stttes and 
received on the Isthmus, whether paid for or not. will 
be taken up t)y the Depot Quartermaster and ac- 
counted for on his property returns. All stores such 
as coal, sand, and miscellaneous supplies, purchased 
from the Panama railroad, will be covered by one 
blanket award at the end of the month to cover bill 
from Panama railroad to the Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission. Subsistence supplies will be billed direct to 
Di\isiou Hngineers and Chief Sanitiry (:)fficer. This 
toajjply in place of Disbursing office circular No. 8 
and Material and Supplies circular No. 177. 

In addition to the original and duplicate sheets on 
his returns, the Depot Quarte#uaster at Mount Hope 
will insert two tjink slips in said returns, on which 
all articles purchased will be entered, separate sheets 
to be kept covering ijurchases in the United Slides 
and those made on the Isthmus. At the end of each 
month, these pink slips will be extracted, numbered 
serially at place arranged for on blank, and will be 
forwarded to the Chief Quartermaster, one copy for 
file in his office and o*ie copy to be transmitted by 
the Chief Quartermaster to the Disbursing Officer. 
Washington, for purchases made in the United 
States, and one copy for transmittal to the Disbur- 
sing (_)fnccr, Canal Zone, for purchases made on the 
Isthmus In connection with bills covering pur- 
chases, either those made in the United States or on 
the Istiinuis. the followinginformation will be slated 
on the bills: 

Date received By whom 

Date inspected By whom " 

Serial number on which this proi)erty 
was accoinited for on property return for 

period ending Also certificate as to 

quantity and quality. 
The Mount Hope storehouse will ultiniatelycontrol 
the Lirio Planing mill, now located at Culcbra, and 
tlie Stationer and Printers pla:it, now located at 
.\ncon. Roth of these plants will be moved to the 
vicinity of Mount Hope Depot. All stationery will 
be carried in stock at Blount Hope Depot, and will be 
distributed for use with statement of cost for cost- 
keeping report, but will be expended at Mount Hope, 
and will not bt.- taken up on the returns of any 
official. r>lank forms will also be distributed in the 
same manner. 

Stock report recorded on stock cards and closed 
every 15 days will be kept at Mount Hope Depot. 

Gorgona ami K in piyc Sforchouses — Gorgona and Em- 
pire storehouses will be operated under the direction 
of the Chief Quarlermaster. They will carry a stock 
adequate for the wants of the Division of Motive 
Power and Machinery, and also for the local District 
Quartermasters and the Division Engineer. I.ssues on 
foremen's requisitions will continue as at present. 
Names of foremen authorized to sign such requisi- 
tions will be forvv'arded to the Chief Quartermaster 
by the responsible officials. A duplicate .slip or car- 
bon copy of each foreman's requisition as it is filled 
will be sent to the official responsible for the fore- 
man's order. This will take the place of an abstract 
of each days business previously furnished same offi- 
cial. Stock cards will be kept in these storehouses 
and closed every two weeks. On the 15th and Inst 
day of each month, it consolidated Expenditure Form. 
QMD-5. showing totals of all expendable stores fur- 
nished various officials, will be rendered. This will 
be a total con.solidation of the slips already furnished, 
and will be signed by the responsible official, and re- 
turned to the storehouse. When so signed, it will be 
authorit,\' for dropping from the storehouse con- 
cerned all the property enumerated on the list. This 
form to be rendered in triplicate separately for each 
official, one copy to be retained by the official, one 
by the storehouse, and one copy forwarded to the 
Chief Quartermaster. Xon-expendable pTopert>' is- 



sued on foreman's requisitions Avill be invoiced to 
the accountable official. 

Otfter Storehouses — Storehouses will be taken over 
and operated by the District Quartermastersat Gatun, 
San Pablo, Bas Obispo, I^isCascadas, Cvdebra. Paraiso, 
Pedro Miguel andAncon. These storehouses will be 
operated under the same rules that apply at the Gor- 
gona and Empire storehuases, sui)plying thcwar.ts of 
other officials as well as those of the District Quarter- 
masters by whom they arc mainl;iined. In a few in- 
stances, where there is no regular storehouse in 
charge of the District Quarlermaster. he will main- 
tain a small storehouse for his own necessities, the 
accountability to be carried on his owm retuni. 

DIVISION ENT.IXEKRS. 

Each Division Engineer will render a return for all 
property for which he is accomitiible in his di\-i.'iiou. 
The return will be rendered on the lomi supplied by 
the Quartermaster's Department. The division en- 
gineers will arrange to keep such distribution record 
in their respective divisions as will give them ade- 
quate information as to the distribution of their ac- 
countability : it being understood that such a record 
is obtainable at all times upon which to check, by in- 
ventory, the Di\'ision Engineer's accountabilit.\' at all 
points. This will be accomplished by a system of 
stock cards, the totals of which are transcribed to 
the return proper. 

SrBSISTENCE TJEP.VRTMENT. 

One return on the prescribed form ^\•iU be rendered 
by the Subsistence Officer for the entire property ac- 
countability in the Subsistence Department. 

DIVISION OF MOTIVE POWER AND M.\CHINERY. 

One return on the prescribed form will be ren- 
dered by the Superintendent for the entire property 
accountability in the Division of Motive Power and 
Machinery-. 

DEPARTMENT OF SANITATION. 

One return on the prescribed form will l^e ren- 
der by the Chief Smitary Officer for the entire prop- 
erty accountiibility in the Department of Sanitation. 

DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL .ADMINISTRATION. 

One returu on the prescribed form will be ren- 
dered by the Head of the DeparMnent of Ci\Tl Ad- 
ministration for tlie entire property accountability in 
the Department of CiWl Administration, except that 
contnined in the Court Houses and in the new and 
old Administration Buildings, which will be rendered 
by District Quartermasters. 

DISTRICT QUART KHMASTER.c. 

District Quartermasters, \\Hth the exceptions as 
noted herein, will be accountable and responsible for 
all property in their respective districts. All property 
not in their immediate possession, including that in 
Dublic buildings, offices, houses, etc.. will be curried 
on memorandum receipts. These memorandum 
receipts, when signed by the occupants, relieve 
the District Quartermaster from responsibility, 
but not from accountability. The District Quar- 
termaster, when any change necessiliitcs a trans- 
fer of memorandum receipts from one responsi- 
ble official or person to another, will at once have the 
memorandum receipt checked up. and the responsi- 
bility verified. This will be strictly enforced e5p*> 
cially with regard to the occupants of all mar- 
ried quarters, and any shortage or damage therein; 
unless voluntarily paid for by the occupant, will be 
presented to tlie sur\'e>' official. 

The District Qnartermastcr's accounL-ibility in the 
rttspective districts is as follows: 

Criiiobal — All furniture and I. C. C. property in 
quarters and in Q. M. storehouses. Q. M. corral and 
equipment. Property of the I. C. C. band. Property 
in pay office. Cristobal. Property in Y. ^l. C. A.club- 
liouse. All proi)erty carried by clerks of circuit 
court. District Judge and Associate Judge. 

6'rt/M«— All fuuiture and other I. C C. property in 
quarters and in Q. M. storehouses. Q. M. corral and 
equipment. 

TaberniNa—\\\ furniture and other I. C. C. prop- 
erty in cpiarlers and in Q. M- >torehou.ses. 

San f\ibIo—A\\ fumitureaiul other l.C. C. property 
in quarters and in Q. M. storehouses. 

Gorgona— M\ furniture and ether I. C. C. property 
in quarters and in Q. M. storehouses. Q. M. corral 
and equipment. Property in Y. M. C. A. clubhouse. 
Property carried by the District Juds;e. 

Bas Obispo — All furniture and other I. C. C. prop- 
erty in quarters and in Q. M. storehouses. Q. M. 
corral and equipment. 

Las Caseadas — All furniture and other I. C. C, prop- 
erty in quarters and in Q. M. storehouses, Q. M. 
corral and etiuipment. 

Empire — All furniture an<l other I. C C. property 
in quarters and in Q. M. .storehouses. Q. :\l. corral 
and equipment. All properly carried by Associate 
Justice. Judgo circuit court, clerk circuit court, and 
by District Judge. Y. M C A. clubhouse property. 
Furniture and office vquii»ment in Disbursing office. 
Furniture and office etiuipment in office Examiner of 
Accounts. Propel t\ in use in truck garden, 

Cnlebra—WX furniture and other I. C. C. property 
in quarters and in Q. M. storehouses. Q. M. corral 
and equipment. V. M. C. A. clubhouse property. 
All furniture and office equipment in general offices. 

Paraiso — All furniture and other 1. C. C. properly 
in quarters and in Q. M. storehouses. Q. M corral 
and equipment. 

Pedro Miguel—KW furniture and ether I. C. C. 
properly in quarters and in Q. M. .storehouses. Q. M. 
corral and equipment. Property in use in truck 
garden. 

Corozai~K\\ furniture and other I. C C. property 



32 



THE CANAL RECORD 



in quarters nnd in Q. M. storehouses. Q. M. corral 
and equipment. Property in use in truck Karden. 

Ancon— An furniture and other I. C. C. property in 
quarters and in Q. M. storehouses. This to include 
furniture in nmrried and bachelor quarters in Ancon 
Hospital Kronuds. u. M. corral and etiuipnient. 
Proiierty in use in truck garden. The furniture and 
office cquitjnient of the general offices in the new 
and old .administration Bnildin.gs. Ancon and Pan- 
ama. The furniture and office equipment of the 
offices and courts of the Circuit Judges. Clerk of the 
Circuit Court. Associate Justice, Clerk of the Associ- 
ate Justice, and District Judge. 

/.a Boca — All furniture and other I. C. C. property 
iu quarters and in Q. M, storehouses, 

Porlo liillo — All furniture and other I, C, C. prop- 
ert>- in quarters and in Q. ]\I. storehouses. 
COST kei:pixc.. 

On and after October 1, 190S. the material account 
current, now prepared monthly and furnished the 
Disbursing Officer, will be discontinued. In lien 
thereof there will be furnished by the head of each 
division or department report on Form 132-CR. Ab- 
stract of E.xpenditures, showing the total cost of the 
operation, divided and separated into such account 
nxnnber as the Examiner of Accounts may from time 
to time require. One copy of this form to be sent to 
the Chainnan, Isthmian Canal Commission, and one 
copy to the E.xamiuer of Accounts, 

This report will include all services and materials 
rendered or furnished the division or department 
submitting the report, and also the cost of the labor 
required in the operation of that division or depart- 
ment. 

Manufactured articles, as at the Gorgona shops. 
Empire shops, l.irio planing mill, etc., will, upon com- 
pletion, be disposed of as follows: ^t Gorgona and 
Empire, articles when completed, will be turned over 
to the storekeeperat Gorgona and Empire, respective- 
ly, with a bill showing cost, including surcharge. 
The article so manufactured will be taken up by the 
storekeeper, and its accountability on the Canal 
Zone initiated at that point. The storekeeper wdll 
then proceed to invoice it to the consignee, showing 
price on the invoice Other products will be simi- 
larly treated at the Mount Hoi>e Depot. 

BLAXK FORMS. 

Blank forms are as follows : 

QMD-1 — Requisition. 

UMI)--'— United .States Order. 

QMD-3— Inspection Call. 

QMD-4 — Combination Invoice and Receipt. 

QMD-5 — Abstract of Supplies Issued. 

CJMD-6 — Statement of Forage and Straw Issued. 

QMD-7 — Front Cover to Property Return. 

QMD-7a — Back Cover to Property Return. 

QMD-7b— Original White Inside .Sheet. 

C>MD-7c — Duplicate Blue Inside Sheet. 

QMD-.S — Front and Cover. Report of Purchases. 

QMD-8a — Back Cover, Report of Purchases, 

QMD-8b— Pink Slip, Purchase Voucher, 

C, A, Devoi., 
Chii'f Quai Irrmasin . 
Approved : 

Geo. W. Goethai-s. 

Chairtnan . 



IVIisdirected Letters. 

Division of Dead Letters. 
Ancon. C. Z., .September 23, 190S. 
The following insufficiently addressed letters, origi- 
nating in the United States and its ijossessions, have 
been received in the office of the Director of Posts, 
and may be obtained on request of addressee: 
Anuish. L. D. JIcArdle. Ellen S. 

Barber. Lou Neri. Louis 

Coyne, R. J. Peters. Calude 

Daley. Joseph 1-. Phelan. Joseph 

Dodge. A. H. Rice. H. N. 

Hamlin. Harold E. Richards. H. C. 

Harwood. Robert Ruedy, W. T. 

Holbrook, F. W. Sheridan. P. L. 

Keeling, Mrs. James R. .Spence. Thos. H. 
Lee, Daniel Teran, tiscar 

Melgord,J. \Ving. Joseph A. 

Mills, J, S. Woodrome. J. E. 

The revenue collected by the Division of 
Posts, Cu.stoms and Revenues in the Canal 
Zone in August amounted to ,'»;13,655.50. Of 
this amount the fees from money orders 
were Si, 822. 06; di.stillation licen.ses,'$]20.25; 
miscellaneous bills, .>1,3.58.18; district li- 
censes, taxes, rents, etc., .$8,643,46; fines, 
costs, etc., in the district courts, ,^^1,711.55. 



Mr. William H. Wagner, injured by a 
Panama railroad train near Gatun, died in 
the Gatun Hospital September 12. He was 
38 years old and had lived on the Isthmus 
three vears. He is survived bv his wife. 



Arrivals and departures at the port of Ancon dur- 
ing the week ending September 18, 190S: 

.Arrivals — September 12. Litiiari, from Valparaiso: 
September 17. Acapiifro; from San Francisco, 

Departures — September 14, /^itraina. to Valparaiso: 
September 16. 5fl« Jose, to San Francisco, 



COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT. 

COMMISSARY PRICES 

Fur week beginning September 21 : 
FRESH ME.'^TS, POULTRY AND COLD MEATS. 

Pi-ice. 

Beef— Sirloin roast per lb 29 

Rump roast per lb 29 

Porterhouse per lb 29 

Rib-roast, shortcut (not under 3V^ 

pounds) per lb 23 

Rib-roast, second cut (not under 3 

pounds) per lb 19 

.Soup per lb S 

Stew per lb 12 

Corned per lb., 12, 14, 16 

Suet peril) 4 

.Steaks— .Sirloin per lb 29 

Porterhouse per lb 29 

Rump per lb 29 

Tenderloin per lb 30 

Round per lb 23 

Veal— Cutlets per lb 23 

Short-cut chops per lb 23 

Loin per lb 22 

Entire forequarter (15 to 20 lbsl,...per lb 11 

IMutton— Stewing per lb 6 

Shoulder and neck (not under 

6 pounds) per lb 7 

Entire forequarter (not under 

10 pounds) per lb S 

Leg (8 to 10 pounds) per lb 16 

.Short-cut chops per lb 20 

Lamb — For stewing per lb 6 

Entire forequarter per lb 8 

Chops perlb 29 

Leg (6 to S pounds) perlb 27 

Pork— Cuts perlb 20 

Livers— Beef perlb 12'/2 

.Sausage— Pork per lb 19 

Sweet bread— Veal each 1.20 

Beef perlb 25 

Ox tongues each 90 

Eggs, fresh dozen 34 

Chickens— Dre-ssed (mijjc-fed) each 1..W 

Large each 1.65 

Capons each 2.40 

Broilers each 60 

Fowls, medium and large each, 80c. and 1.00 

Ducks, fatted (fancy) each 1.10 

.Suckling pigs each 4.90 

Turkeys perlb 30 

.Squabs each 45 

Bacon— Strips perlb 23 

English, breakfast sliced per lb §26 

Ham — Sugar-cured, sliced perlb §25 

One-half, for boiling per lb §21 

Westphalia per lb 45 

Ferris perlb 20 

Beef. Sidt. family per lb 16 

Salt pork perlb 13 

DAIRY PRODUCTS. 

Butter-Prints, prime quality perlb 33 

Cheese — Ro<iuefort perlb 45 

Nenfchatel each 6 

Yoinig America pel lb 22 

Swiss perlb 33 

Gonda,.. perlb M 

Edam .. each 1,05 

Camerabert perlb 28 

McLaren's jar 15 

Pinxter's tin 22 

French cheese in tins — Camembert, Roque- 
fort, Brie, Neufchatel tin 20 

Buttermilk quart 15 

Milk. Briarclilt quart 25 

VEGETABLES AND FRUITS, 

Tomatoes perlb 8 

Lettuce per lb 14 

White potatoes perlb 3V2 

Cabbage perlb 4 

Onions perlb 3V2 

Turnips perlb 3V2 

Beets per lb 3 

Squash (summer) perlb 3 

Alligator peari each 5 

Limes hundred 40 

Lemons dozen 24 

Oranges dozen 18 

(jrapefmit each 3 

Canteloupes each 10 

Watermelons each ■ 45 

Grapes per lb 10 

.\pples perlb 6 

Peaches perlb 12 

Pears psr lb 12 



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS. . 

The following is a list of the sailings of the Pan- 
ama Railroad Ste.imship Company, of the Royal 
Mail Steam Packet Company, of the Hamburg- 
.\merican Line, and of the United Fruit Company's 
Line, the Panam.-i Railroad Company's dates being 
subject to change ; 

FROM NEW YORK TO COLON. 

Orinoco R,-M Saturday Sept, 19 

AUianca P. R. R, Monday Sept, 21 

Finance P. R. R.Saturday .Sept. 26 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Saturday Sept. 26 

Panama P. R. R.Thursday Oct. 1 

Atrato R.-M... .Saturday Oct. 3 

Colon P. R. R.Tuesday Oct. 6 

Prinz Aug. Wilhelra H.-A Saturday Oct. 10 

Trent R.-M .Saturday . . . .Oct. 17 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Saturday Oct. 24 

Tagus R.-M Saturday Oct. 31 

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm H.---V Saturday Nov. 7 

Magdalena R.-M Saturday Nov. 14 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Saturday Nov. 21 

Orinoco R.-M Saturday Nov. 28 

Atrato R.-M Saturday Dec. 12 

Trent R.-M Saturday Dec. 26 

All the steamers of the Hamburg-American and 
Royal Mail lines call at Kingston enroute to Colon. 

from colon to new YORK. 

Colon P. R. R.Wedne-sday Sept. 23 

Advance P. R. R.Monday .Sept. 28 

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm.. ..H.-.^... .Tuesday Sept. 29 

AUianca P. R. R. Saturday Oct. 3 

Clyde R.-M. ...Tuesday Oct. 6 

Finance P. R. R.Thursday Oct. 8 

Panama P. R. R.Tuesday Oct. 13 

Prinz Joachim H.-.\ Tuesday Oct. 13 

Colon P. R. R. Monday Oct. 19 

Tagus R.-M Tuesday Oct. 20 

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm.. ..H.-A Tuesday Oct. 27 

Magdalena R.-M:. ...Tuesday Nov. 3 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Tuesday Nov. 10 

Orinoco R.-M Tuesday Nov. 17 

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm. ...H.-A Tuesday Nov. 24 

Atrato R.-M Tuesday Dec 1 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Tuesday Dec. 8 

Trent R.-M Tuesday Dec. 15 

F'ROM NEW ORLEANS TO COLON. 

Pari.smina U.F.C.. Saturday Sept. 19 

Heridla U.F.C.. Saturday Sept. 26 

Cartago U.F.C.. Saturday Oct. 3 

Parismina U.F.C.. Saturday Oct. 10 

Heridia U.F.C.. Saturday Oct. 17 

CarUigo U.F.C.. Saturday Oct. 24 

Parismina U.F.C.. Saturday Oct. 31 

Heridia U.F.C... Saturday Nov. 7 

Cartago U.F.C. .Saturday Nov. 14 

Parismina U.F.C. Saturday Nov. 21 

Heridia U.F.C. .Saturday Nov. 28 

FROM COLON TO NEW ORLEANS. 

Pari.smina U.F.C. .Tuesday Sept. 29 

Heridia U.F.C. Tuesday Oct. 6 

Cartago U.F.C. .Tuesday Oct. 13 

Parismina U.F.C. Tuesday Oct. 20 

Heridia U.F.C. .Tuesday Oct. 27 

Cartago U.F.C. .Tuesday Nov. 3 

Parismina U.F.C. .Tuesday Nov. 10 

Heridia U.F.C. .Tuesday Nov. 17 

Cartago U.F.C .Tue.sday Nor. 24 

Parismina U.F.C, .Tuesday Dec. 1 

FROM COLON TO BARF.^DOS. CALLINO AT TRINIDAD. 

Orinoco R.-M. ..Tuesday Sept. 29 

FROM COLON TO NEW ORLE.\NS VIA KINGSTON. 

Tampican Leyland Line. .Sunday Sept- 20 

William Cliff Leyland Linc.Tuesday Sept. 29 

The Panama railroad steamships sail at 3 p. m. 
from dock at Cristobal direct to New York. 

The Prinz steamers of the Hamburg-American line 
sail from Colon at 1 p. m. via Kingston. Jamaica, 
for New York. 

All Ro\;il .Mail steamers mentioned above leave early 
in the morning from Colon via Kingston. Jamaica, 
for New York, .-ill mail and passei'-gers should be 
on board early on day of sailing. 

The steamers of the United Fruit Company's line 
sail from New Orleans at 11 a. m.. and from Colon 
at 1., 30 p. m.. via Port Limon. for New Orleans. In 
addition to the above, the United Fruit Company 
dispatches a steamer about every ten days from 
Colon. \na Bocas del Toro, for New Orleans. 

Sailings of the French line CCie. G4n6rale Trans- 
atlantique) for Venezuelan ports. Martinique and 
Guadeloupe on the 3d and 20th of each month. 



§ Sold only from cold-storage and not from Com- 
missaries, 



The steamship Easlfields. from Gulfport. is due on 
September 24 with 974 piles for use in the relocation 
of the Panama railroad, and 327 pieces of white oak 
lumber for the Mechanical Division 



CANAL 




RECORD 



Volume II. 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1908. 



No. 5. 



The Canal Record 

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of the 
ISTHMIAN CANAL COMMISSION 



"The Canal Record" is issued J tw oj charge, one 
copy each, to all employes of the Comtnission and Pan- 
ama Railroad Company ivhose names are on the "sold" 
roll. Extra copies can be obtained from the news 
stands of the Panama Raihoad Company for Jive cents 
each 



Address all Communications 

THE CANAL RECORD 

Ancon, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama. 

No communication .either Jor publication o^ request- 
fns injonnation. will receive attention unless signed 
with the jull name and address of the writer. 

NOTES OF PROGRESS. 

A Correction. 

In the summary of the Chairman's report 
for the month of August, which appeared in 
The Canai, Rkcord of September 23, an 
error was made in giving the amount of ex- 
cavation from the Canal prism. The amount 
given, 1,375,991 cubic yards, is the amount 
excavated by dred'^es, and to this should be 
added 1,834,479 cubic yards taken out by 
steam shovels, the total excavation from the 
prism being 3,210,470 cubic yards. 



Supplies for the Commissary. 

Bids will be opened in New York within 
the next few days for food supplies for the 
Commissarj- up to January 1, 1909. The 
articles have been separated into classes; 
and on canned fruits and vegetables deli verb- 
is called for either at La Boca or at Colon, 
cost, insurance and freight to be paid In- 
the contractor, with inspection at the point 
of origin. It is thought that low prices will 
be secured on the Pacific coast for canned 
fruits and vegetables, to be delivered at La 
Boca. 

Washington has been eliminated as a 
point for opening bids for Commissary 
supplies on account of the lack of jobbers, 
and Chicago and St. Paul have been added, 
these being the milling and packing centers 
of the United States. The contracts call for 
delivery of packing-house products in car- 
load lots, cost, insurance and freight paid at 
Colon. It is thought that this arrangement 
will give cheaper prices on all packing-house 
products, as the manufacturer will be able to 
obtain the through export car-load rate from 
the point of origin. 

On some other articles, which are semi- 
perishable, such as beans, peas, rice, etc., 
the contracts will provide for either La Boca 
or Colon delivery, with inspection as to 
quality, at the point of origin, and inspection 
on the Isthmus as to condition on arrival. 



Proprietary articles handled by the Commis- 
sary have been taken out of the general 
classification and placed in a class by them- 
selves, to be delivered at either New York 
or New Orleans. The lack of a fast express 
refrigerator service on the Pacific coast 
makes it impossible to procure fresh fruits 
and vegetables from California. 



Family Quarters at Camp Diablo. 

Camp Diablo, on the line of the Panama 
railroad between Corozal and Panatna, will 
become a family settlement of gold employes 
as soon as the remodeling can be done 
which will convert the nine laborers' bar- 
racks at that place into family quarters. 
The barracks are one-story buildings, 68 feet 
by 35 feet, and two apartments will be parti- 
tioned off in each. These apartments will 
be 35 feet by 34 feet, and will be divided 
into a living room, dining room, two bed- 
rooms, kitchen, pantr\-, clothes closet, toilet, 
and bath. Each apartment will have a 
screened porch, the porches running across 
opposite ends of the building. 



Ancon Hill Reservoir. 

The site selected for the million-gallon 
concrete reservoir on .-Vncon Hill is on that 
portion of the hill now occupied by the high 
pressure water tank. The primary purpose 
of the reservoir is as reserve fire protection 
for La Boca, Ancon, and Panama, but the 
plan which contemplates its construction 
also includes the installation of a new unit 
in the filter plant, which will give filtered 
water to the quarters at .\ncon. Work will 
be begun as soon as reinforcing bars arrive 
on the Isthmus. 



Miraflores Tunnel. 

Work will be discontinued on the earth 
section of Miraflores tunnel until the dry 
season. On the night of September 21 the 
section of the tunnel where the earth joins 
the rock, about 130 feet from the ori.ginal 
south portal, and 230 feet from the portal as 
extended, caved in and approximately 3,000 
cubic yards of earth now block that part of 
the tunnel. The heavy rains of the oast two 
weeks have both loosened and added weight 
totheearth, andthe side of the hill iscrack- 
ingin a dozen places as the slide progresses. 

In the rock section of the tunnel the con- 
crete lining is about completed. The north 
portal will be extended 50 feet before the 
retaining wall for the approach is begun. 



Quartermaster's Price List. 

The Chief Quartermaster wishes to an- 
nounce that the publication of the price li t 
for all stores and supplies in the Can;.! 
Zone has been delayed, owing to the laclc 
of material in the printing offices at Panan.i 
and Cristobal. Every effort has been made 
to produce this price list on time, but it is 
now apparent that it will not be out by Oc- 



tober 1. Therefore, the Depot Quartermaster 
at Mount Hope has been instructed to insert 
prices on invoices of all materials and sup- 
plies issued from that depot until the price 
list is finished. 



Dispensing With Paper Work. 

In an effort to lessen the amount of cleri- 
cal work involved in the promotion of em- 
plo\-es of his department, the Chief Quarter- 
master, with the approval of the Chairman, 
has established a salary rating for the fifteen 
districts under his control. This rating pro- 
vides for all employes under the district 
quartermasters, and is in effect an authoriza- 
tion to each district quartermaster, the total 
of which constitutes a flat rate for the month- 
ly service in his district, beyond which the ex- 
penses of his district must not go. Changes 
in the salaries paid men on the gold roll will 
be referred, as heretofore, to the Chief Quar- 
termaster for the approval of the Chairman, 
but all wages on the silver rolls, within the 
ratings prescribed, are subject to chan.ge by 
the district quartermasters. 

Subject to the approval of the Chairman, 
an agreement has been made between the 
Chief Quartermaster and the -Subsistence 
Officer bj- which a flat rate will be paid 
monthly by the Subsistence Department for 
all services rendered it under the headings of 
commissary, subsistence, and transportation. 
This will avoid the clerical w-ork heretofore 
necessary in the monthly rendering of item- 
ized bills and adjustment of accounts. 



Hotels and Messes. 

On the recommendation of the Subsistence 
Officer, the Chairman has decided that Com- 
mission hotels shall hereafter be furnished 
by the Commission with fuel, light, fixtures, 
cookstoves, etc., which heretofore have been 
a charge against the meals. Fuel, light, 
and kitchen fixtures have been furnished 
with married quarters for some time past, 
and the new ruling is made to place the 
bachelors on an equal footing with the 
married men. 

The European laborers' mess in process 
of construction at Pedro Miguel is being ex- 
tended so that it will easily accommodate 450 
men. It w-ill be the largest mess on the 
Isthmus. The building will be one story in 
hei.ght, with ventilated roof, and of the 
type and construction of the Commission 
nies:. houses. A screened veranda will run 
u.ro'js the front. It will be 121 feet long, 
71 feet deep on one side where an extension 
is being made in the shape of an L, and 55 
feet 1 inches deep on the other side. The 
dining room will extend across the front 
ami will be 121 feet long and 30 feet 6 inches 
widf, and will also include the L, which will 
be 30 feet 6 inches by 34 feet. There will 
be 20 long tables, each accommodating twen- 
ty-four men without crowding. The back 
part of the building will ,be divided into a 



34 



THE CANAL RECORD 



NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



{Contin ttt'd) 



kitchen 56 feet by 18 feet, a cold storage 
space of 385 cubic feet, a storeroom, and a 
room and bath for the steward. The 
kitchen will be equipped with steam boilers 
and power-cooking machinery. 

The mess hall for European laborers at 
Miraflores is to be refitted and used as a 
Commission hotel, and the hotel now used 
will be turned over to the Quartermaster's 
Department. Anewmesshall for European 
laborers has been authorized. 

In the messes for common laborers the 
rice and sugar components of the rations 
will be increased. Some temporary mess 
houses, under canvas, for a few of the com- 
mon laborers' mess kitchens will be put up, 
and if they prove popular with the men it 
is possible that some permanent form of 
shelter will be provided. At present the 
common laborers take their food from the 
mess kitchen to their quarters, or elsewhere, 
no common mess hall being provided. 



Rain Causes Slides. 

Recent rains have caused several small 
land slides along the line of the Panama 
railroad. At Whitehouse \ard the roadbed 
has shown a teu<lency to slide into the Ca- 
macho diversion, and the two 200- foot 
stretches of the embankment at this place 
will be riprapped. A stretch 64 feet long 
has slipped so close to the northbound track 
that it has been deemed unsafe to use the 
track on this section of the road. A trestle 
will be built at this point under the north- 
bound track, and will be reinforced by- 
French rails, joining it with piles to be 
driven on the west side of the southbound 
track. At Empire and Paraiso small slides 
are being riprapped. 



Old French Dynamite. 

A steam shovel at work digging rock in 
Peninsula 2, between Matachin and Gorgona, 
a few weeks ago lifted out a quantity of d}-- 
namite, which is described as having been 
"a bushel." The explosive was in sticks 
% of an inch in diameter, and 5 inches long, 
and the cartridges bore the trademark of a 
French manufacturer of d3-naniite, and a 
date, which appeared to be November 29, 
1887. Unquestionably the dynamite was put 
in by the French and either failed to explode 
or was abandoned when the work ceased on 
that part of the old French canal. Although 
apparently in perfect condition, the dyna- 
mite could not be exploded. 



Hardvsrood Ties Cor Panama Railroad. 

A contract has been awarded to E. Clare 
& E. Clare, jr., of Panama, for $54,995 
worth of cross ties for use on the relocated 
Panama railroad. The ties must comply 
with the specifications published in recent 
issues of Thr Canal Record. They will 
be of black, or yellow guaiacum, commonlv 
called guayacan or lignum vitae. The suc- 
cessful bidders offered to deliver ties of the 
first-class for >1.10 a piece, and ties of the 
second-class for $\. The next lowest bidder 
offered ties at $1.25 a piece. 

The initial cost of these hardwood ties, as 
compared with the cost of ties purchased in 
the United States, is from 25 to 50 per cent 
greater, and for temporary work they might 
not be economical, but for use on the per- 



manent line of the Panama railroad their 
economy is apparent when it is known the.\- 
will last from four to five times as long as 
the ordinary tie. It is more expensive to lay a 
track with hardwood ties, because each tie 
must be bored in order that the spikes ma}- 
be driven, but this added expense is also 
overcome by the greater length of time that 
the hardwood ties can be used. 



New Superintendent of Schools. 

Prof. Henr\- Lester Smith, the new Superin- 
tendent of Schools, arrived on the Isthmus 
on September 22, and has assumed charge 
of the Division of Schools. 

Mr. Smith is a graduate of the Indiana 
State University, holding the degrees of 
A. B. and A. M. from that institution. He 
has been engaged in the teaching profession 
for the past ten years, and just prior to his 
coming to the Isthmus was Supervising 
Principal of one of the public school districts 
in the city of Indianapolis. 

Forage Requisition. 

Requisition has been made for 750 tons of 
hay and 450 tons of oats for use in the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission corrals, this being 
the amount of forage required for a six 
months' period. The bids will be asked for 
six mouths in advance of the time of award, 
and timoth\', w-heat, or oat hay will be ac- 
cepted. The long period given for submit- 
ting bids, and the option with regard to the 
kind of ha)' offered are an inducement to 
Pacific coast forage men to enter the compe- 
tition. Delivery will be accepted either at 
Colon or La Boca. 



Ne^T Commissaries. 

New commissaries have been authorized 
for Pedro Miguel, Porto Bello, and Gatun. 
Those at Pedro Miguel and Gatun will be 
of standard type, but the Porto Bello com- 
missary ■will be smaller. On account of the 
distance of Porto Bello from the cold stor- 
age plant and the bakery at Cristobal, a 
small refrigerator plant and bakery will be 
run in connection with the commissarv. 



Cargo of Foodstuffs Condemned. 

Because of some doubt as to the extent 
to which the cargo of foodstuffs, carried by 
the steamship Colon on her recent stormy 
voyage, was rendered unfit for use, the 
whole cargo has been condemned, and none 
of it will be delivered. This action was 
taken immediatel}-, and it has recentl)- been 
confirmed bj' a report of one of the Com- 
mission chemists. 



Opening of Schools. 

H. L. Smith, Superintendent of Schools, 
has issued the following: 

The schools of the Canal Zone will be 
opened at the places named below on Thurs- 
day, October 1, at 8 a. m. It is essential 
that all children be present on the first day, 
bringing with them the report cards issued 
to them at the close of school last June. 

Schools for white children w-ill be opened 
at the following places, in the buildings used 
for white schools last year: Ancon, Pedro 
Miguel, Paraiso, Culebra, Empire, Las Cas- 
cadas, Gorgona, Gatun, Cristobal, and Colon 
Beach . 

Colored schools will be opened at the fol- 
lowing places: La Boca, Las Sabannas, Pa- 
raiso, Culebra, Empire, Matachin, Cruces, 



Gorgona, San Pablo, Tabernilla, Bohio, 
Mount Hope, Cristobal, and Pleya del Flor. 
White children of school age living in 
towns in which no white schools are as yet 
establishe<l will be pro\ided w-itli free trans- 
portation to the most convenient white 
school already established. Responsibility-, 
however, for the transportation of pupils on 
the trains of the Panama railroad will rest 
entireh- with the parents. Parents to whom 
this paragraph applies should make request 
for transportation for their children to the 
Superintendent of Schools, Aucon, C. Z. 



Colon Arrives at Newr -york. 

The steamship Colon which sailed from 
Cristobal on Wednesday, September 2i, after 
undergoing temporary repairs of the dam- 
age she sustained in the hurricane on Sep- 
tember 12, arrived safely at New York on 
the morning of September 29. 



The electrical engineering department of 
the Panama railroad will be consolidated 
w-ith the telephone and telegraph depart- 
ment on October 1. This change is made 
because the electric light plant on the beach 
at Colon has been consolidated w-ith the 
plant run by the Subsistence Department at 
Cristobal. 



A contract for 60,000 pounds of charcoal 
has been let to Marcio Blanco, of Panama, at 
.''^1.25 per hundred pounds. This charcoal 
is made on the Isthmus, and mu.st be from 
mangle wood or some w-ood of equal vah e 
in making charcoal. 

Stag-es of the Chai^res. 
Maxiumm height of Chagres above low 
water for the week ending nudni;;ht, Sep- 
tember 26, 1908 : 





.Stations. 






3 




6 


H 




Tn 


K 


a 


s 


3 
















> 


< 


o 


n 


o 


Heigrht of low water 












above meau sea 












level, feet 


129 


92 


46 








Maximum height ab. 












low water, feet: 












Suuday. Sept. 20. ... 


3.80 


3.63 


4.30 


7.75 


3.1-1 


Mouda.v. Sept. 21.... 


3.85 


3.65 


5.20 


8.40 


2.; J 


Tuesday, Sept. 21... 


4.90 


4.30 


5.60 


8.58 


2.80 


Wedn'sday.Sept. 23 


2.70 


3.11 


5.45 


8.95 


2,S_i 


Thursday. Sept. 24. 


8.30 


6.50 


7.70 


8.,S5 


2,98 


Friday, Sept. 25 


4.80 


5.69 


9.00 


12.15 


4.50 


Saturday, Sept. 26., 


3.00 


3.41 


5.90 


9.:o 


3.40 


Maximum for week.. 


8.30 


6.50 


9.00 


12.15 


4.50 















Rainfall, September 1 to 26, 190S, Iti.-!;-.- 
sive. 

(midnight to midnight.) 

Maximum 

Stations. in Total, 
one day ' 

Atla}ilic Division — 

Cristobal 2,41 9,69 

Brazos Brook 1.10 8,10 

Gatun 1.26 7.88 

Bohio 1.65 8.15 

Central Division — 

Tabernilla 2.00 12.06 

.San Pablo 1.84 9.27 

Bas Obispo ,96 6.59 

Gamboa .80 6,13 

Empire 1.52 9.43 

Camacho 2,37 10.72 

Culebra 2.27 13.33 

RioGrande 3.26 14.76 

Pacific Division — 

Pedro Miguel 2,46 7.07 

La Boca LIS S.4S 

Ancon 1.39 5.59 

Upper Chasres. 

.Mh.ajuela 2.16 11.04 



THE CANAL RECORD 



35 



SAND FOR PACIFIC LOCKS. 

Deposits at Chame— Methods for Handling 
and Transporting. 

A million cubic j-ards of sand will be re- 
quired for the concrete work at Miraflores 
Locks and Dams, and the locks at Pedro 
Miguel. Good sand is not found in many 
places on the Isthmus. The Atlantic Divi- 
sion will bring its supply for the work at 
Gatuu from Nombre de Dios, a harbor thirty 
miles east of Colon, where a large deposit 
exists. To carry the amount needed at Mir- 
aflores and Pedro Miguel across the Isth- 
mus would be more expensive than han- 
dling it by water on the Pacific side, and on 
this account it has been decided to tow it in 
barges from Cham6 to La Boca and ship it 
from that point by railroad to Miraflores and 
Pedro Miguel. The sand deposits at Chor- 
rera, eighteen miles east of La Boca, were 
first considered, but an investigation showed 
that not enough could be supplied from 
that place, while the harbor, which is 
entered b}- a long narrow channel, made the 
problem of handling barges a ver\' annoying 
one. In August, 1907, a preliminary inves- 
tigation was made at Chame, where the sand 
is abundant, sharp, clean, and of good qual- 
ity, although not uniform. Three weeks ago 
a drill part.\- was sent up from La Boca for the 
purpose of further investigation in order that 
all preliminary work may be done by the 
time the Pacific Division is ready to have 
material delivered. 

Chame is the name of a native village and 
a little bay, in Panamanian territory, about 
twenty miles west of La Boca. At this place 
a bar of sand projects from the mountainous 
coast forming a peninsula about five miles 
long and tapering from the shoreline, where 
it is half a mile wide, to a point, where it 
ends in Panama Bay. Cham6 bay is well 
sheltered on two sides b}- the shore and the 
peninsula, and opposite the entrance, only 
a few miles to the eastward, is the island of 
Taboga. In the dry season the trade winds 
sweep over the bay, but leave the water in 
the lee of the peninsula little disturbed. The 
latest hydrographic survey was made over 
halfa century ago by British hydrographers. 
Soundings made recenth- give a depth of 
from two to si.x fathoms of water within two 
hundred yards of the shore. The native 
village is situated near the hills, and there 
is a hamlet of twenty bamboo huts about a 
mile from the point. Close to this hamlet 
the Commission boring party has pitched 
its camp. 

The whole peninsula is a sand spit over- 
lying a bed of blue cla}-. In the report on 
the investigation made last )-ear it was said: 

.\t a distance of 9.0110 feet from the point there is a 
mangrove swamp which extends over a mile be.vond 
the 9000-feet point and is of very irregular outline. 
In this swamp, and where its tidal inlets join the 
bay, the blue clay underlying the .sand comes to the 
surface. There is no trace of coral or any other rock. 
The formation seems to be simply a blanket of sand 
resting on blue clay. The surface of this clay 
dips as you proceed from the swamp towards the 
point and after one is within 6.000 feet of the point, 
borings 15 feet deep into the sand at both hi.gh and 
low tide, failed to reach the underl.\'iiig clay. 

It is estimated that between the point and 
the swamp there are approximately four 
million cubic yards of sand. The coarsest 
and better grade is that found on the beach, 
between high and low water. From this 
tidal belt, which is 200 j'ards wide, the sand 
for the Pacific locks and dams will be 
taken. Borings are being made along about 



two miles of beach. Private land titles in 
Panama run only to the high water line and 
as the sand to be taken out is on land owned 
by the Panamanian Government no remu- 
neration need be made for it. 

It is proposed t(b take the sea-going ladder 
dredge Gopher off the work in the Canal 
prism at La Boca and send it up to Cham^, 
where it can work on the ocean side of the 
peninsula in the trade wind season, and in- 
side in the rainy season. In this way the 
best sand from both sides of the peninsula 
can be obtained. This dredge can operate 
to a depth of 30 feet, and take out and dump 
on barges 2,500 cubic yards of sand a day. 
After the sand excavation is begun it is esti- 
mated that the Gopher \s\\\ spend about one- 
third of its time at Chame and two-thirds in 
the Canal prism near La Boca. In order 
that the excavation may not suffer by the 
withdrawal of the sea-going dredge, the old 
French ladder dredge. No. 21, is being re- 
built for the La Boca service. 

The single screw tug Katherine Moran, 
now known as Cocoli, was purchased for use 
in this service, and the tug La Boca can also 
be used if necessary. 

To act as a tender to the dredge at Cham^, 
in carrying supplies from La Boca and in 
hauling the barges from the dredge to a 
point where the tugs will take them in tow, 
the steam trawler Riversdale has been pur- 
chased. 

Ten barges of 500 yards capacity each have 
been ordered, six of them are already on the 
Isthmus, and two of them are on the wa>-s 
at La Boca. 

A dock 800 feet long will be constructed 
at La Boca for the purpose of handling the 
sand. It will be taken from the barges and 
loaded on cars for delivery at the Locks' sites, 
where it will be stored until needed. The 
storage capacity at the Locks' sites is about 
250,000 cubic vards. 



THE TOWING FLEETS. 

Tugs and Steamers for Service in Atlantic 
and Pacific Divisions. 

The tug M. E. Scully, with a tow of two 
barges of coal, arrived at Cristobal a few 
weeks ago. The addition of this tug com- 
pletes the Atlantic towing fleet, so far as 
present plans go. The fleet now consists of 
five tugs, and one stern-wheel steamboat on 
the ways. The tugs are in use in the Porto 
Bello and Nombre de Dios service and with 
the dredges in Fvimon Baj-. On the Pacific 
side are two tugs and the steam trawler 
Riversdale, for use in the sand service and 
in towing at La Boca. A few facts about 
each boat follow: 

.\TI,.\NTIC DIVISION. 

The Gatuu, loTmerly the H. B. Chamber- 
lain; purchased from Dailey & Ivins, deliv- 
ered at New York on June 1, 1906. Length 
over all, 102 feet; beam, 22 feet; depth of 
hold, 10 feet; draft, 9 feet; speed, 13 knots; 
bunker capacity, 90 tons; engines, 1500-horse 
power. 

The Porto Bello, formerly the Robert H. 
Smith, purchased at Baltimore in Septem- 
ber, 19U7; built in 1906. Length over all, 
126 feet, beam 23.5. feet; depth of hold, 18 
feet; draft, 14 feet; speed, 10.5 knots. 

The IMariner, purchased in United States, 
arrived at Cri,stobal .April 2, 190S. Length 
overall, 113 feet; beam, 25.5 feet; depth of 
hold, 13.5 feet; draft, 12 feet. 

The Bohio, formerly the yar.^ Twohy, pur- 



chased of Lamberts Point Towboat Company, 
June 8, 1908. Length over all, 104 feet; 
beam, 21.5 feet; depth, 11.2 feet; draft, 11 
feet. 

The Af. E. Scully was built in 1906 by 
John H. Dialogue & Co.", Camden, N. J., 
and purchased by the Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission at Newport News, in July, 1908. It 
has a steel hull; gross tonnage, 272; one 
triple expansion engine, cylinders 14 by 24 
by 40; stroke, 2 feet 6 inches; one boiler, 
10 feet long, 180 inches diameter; steam, 187 
pounds; length over all, 134 feet; beam, 25 
feet; draft, 13 feet 6 inches. 

The stern-wheel steamer is 108 feet 4 
inches long, 20 feet 10 inches wide, 5 feet 3 
inches deep, will draw 2 feet 8 inches and 
displace 100 tons. It will be driven by two 
tandem compound engines with cylinders 7 
inches by 14 inches, stroke of 4 feet, pres- 
sure 180 pounds. This steamer will be used 
in towing in the old French Canal between 
Cristobal and the handling dock at Gatuu. 

PACIFIC DIVISION. 

The La Boca is 118 feet long, 2i feet 
wide and 12 feet 6 inches deep. On the 
upper deck is the pilot house, and back of 
it the captain's room. On the second deck 
is a deckhouse, made of 3-16-inch iron, 
containing quarters for the engineers and 
mates, and a kitchen and messroom. The 
quarters for the sailors are in the fore- 
castle. This tug has triple expansion sur- 
face-condensing engines, with one cylindri- 
cal return tubular boiler, and has 600 
rated horse power. It is fitted with electric 
lights and searchlight. The La Boca was 
formerly the E. G. Reynolds, and was 
practically new when brought to the Isth- 
mus in 1907. 

The Cocoli is the rechristened Katherine 
Moran, which was built in 1904 at Phila- 
delphia. She is 96 feet long, 23 feet wide 
and 12 feet 4 inches deep, and is of 213 tons 
register. She is built of steel, and is pro- 
pelled by a single screw. 

The Riversdale was built at Hull, England, 
in 1899, and is a single screw, one deck, two 
mast, ketch rigged ship; 102 feet long, 20 
feet 6 inches broad, and 11 feet deep. One 
steel boiler of 160 pound? pressure, and thnee 
triple compound, 3-crank, inverted cylin- 
der engines supplj' power. The indicated 
horse power is 300, and the rated speed 10 
knots. The gross tonnage is 180.36 tons, 
and the registered tonnage 58.61 tons. 
The Riversdale came to Panama about five 
months ago, on her way to Cocas Island, 
where she was to hunt for treasure, said to 
be hidden there. 



Two steam shovels, buried in the mud at 
the Cucaracha slide b\-tlie rain of September 
14, were finally extricated September 21. 
Notwithstanding the loss of the work of 
these two shovels for the whole week, the 
excavation record for the Central Division, 
so far as car measurement maj- be relied 
upon, did not fall off. 



Three t3'pe 17 quarters are being con- 
structed at Corozal by contract. All mate- 
Tial will be furnished by the Commission. 
These are the first houses of this type, one- 
family married quarters, to be constructed 
by contract. Advertisement will be made 
for proposals as soon as the location is deter- 
mined and specifications prepared. 



36 



THE CANAL RECORD 



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE. 

Meeting of Federation of Women's Clubs, 
Cltib Work and Other Features. 

The third meeting of the Canal Zone Fed- 
eration of Woman's Clubs was held at Gor- 
gona, September 28. Special car.s attached 
to the rear of the trains from the terminals 
of the Panama railroad brought the dele- 
gates, who were met by the members of the 
entertaining club. .\t noon the various Fed- 
eration committees had their sittings in the 
clubhouse, and at 1 o'clock a special lunch 
was served at the Commission hotel on deco- 
rated tables, fifty-three covers being laid. 

The business meeting, which was held in 
the clubroom over the dining room, was 
called to order by the president, Mrs. Lorin 
C. Collins at 2 o'clock. Mrs. E. S. Calvit, 
president of the Gorgona club welcomed the 
delegates and visiting women. The regular 
reports were read and adopted. Owing to 
removals and resignations committee va- 
cancies were filled as follows: /\rt and litera- 
ture, Mrs. E. Lewis Baker; educational, 
Mrs. Louise Hanson; library extension, 
Mrs. Charles Boxer; nominating, Mrs. H. R. 
Trask. 

Owing to the vacation period, there were 
few reports from the presidents. Two of the 
clubs outlined the work to be taken up for 
the coming year. The interesting reports 
were those of the delegates to the ' 'biennial' ' 
held in Boston in June. The chairman of the 
delegation, Mrs. Thomas E. Brown, Jr., 
gave an admirable survey of the business 
sessions with excerpts from the addresses of 
the president and others. The social side of 
the convention was dealt with in the report 
by Mrs. E. E. Quimby, which was read, in 
the absence of the delegate, by Mrs. Boxer. 
At the conclusion of these reports votes of 
thanks were tendered to the delegates. A 
discussion of club work lead b)- Miss Beattie, 
Mrs. J. J. Jackson and Mrs. Hanson followed. 

A discussion regarding transfer from one 
club to another and the regulation of dues 
in such event, resulted in a resolution that 
a member in good standing may transfer 
without further payment of dues until the 
annual meeting of the club into which she 
is transferred takes place. The design for 
a Federation badge was submitted, and one 
sent by Tiffany was selected. It consists of 
a shield-shaped pin, with a design of laurel 
leaves encircling it and the letters " C. Z. 
F." engraved in the center. 

The Federation accepted the invitation of 
the Ancon Woman's Club to hold the Janu- 
ary meeting with that organization. An in- 
vitation will be extended to Mrs. Philip N. 
Moore, president of the general Federation, 
to be the guest of the Federation for the 
convention. 

The meeting authorized votes of thanks 
to the officials of the Panama railroad for 
their courtesy to the clubwomen, and thanks 
were also extended to the entertaining club 
for its generous hospitality. 

The social meeting was held in the enter- 
tainment hall of the clubhouse, which was 
beautifull}- decorated for the occasion. Re- 
freshments were served at small tables, where 
the guests gathered informally. A large 
number of guests were present and the re- 
ception was marked by entire informality. 
Mrs. Adolph Faure gave a number of songs. 

This meeting, although devoted to club 
matters and business, committee conferences 



and reports, was one of the most satisfac- 
torv that the Federation has held. It dem- 
onstrated more forcibly than anything else 
has done the interest in the movement and 
the real club spirit that has awakened in the 
women of the Zone. 

At the close of a recent meeting of the 
Gorgona Woman's Club the organization 
made a presentation of a set of souvenir 
spoons to the retiring secretary, Mrs. D. E. 
Hayes, in recognition of her faithful and self- 
sacrificing service during her term of office. 
The receipts from the recent entertainment 
given by the club amounted to over $100. 

The educational department of the Cris- 
tobal Woman's Club has organized a .sewing 
class for young girls, which meets at the 
residence of the chairman, Mrs. E. P. 
Eppelsheimer. Practical sewing and needle- 
work are taught. The class has at present 
14 members, all of whom are enthusiastic 
about their work. At the close of the club 
year it is proposed to give an exhibition of 
the work. During the sewing there is read- 
ing, which is considered an important part 
of the class work. 

The Cristobal club will resume its meet- 
ings the first Wednesday in October. The 
departments have been preparing their 
programs for the year. The art and litera- 
ture, and educational departments have the 
year's work read}'. The work of thephilaii- 
thropy department is also well in hand. 

The Pedro Miguel Woman's Club has re- 
sumed regular meetings, which are held at 
the residences of the different members. 
The opening session, at the home of the 
president, Mrs. Frank R. Roberts, on Sep- 
tember 16, was well attended. The Pedro 
Miguel Social and Recreative Club has asked 
the woman's club to cooperate with them in 
the purchase of a piano for the club room, 
and in response to this request a social even- 
ing has been arranged for October 1. Home- 
made refreshments will be sold, and simple 
entertainments provided. The Woman's 
club will hold its annual meeting with elec- 
tion of officers October 5. 

The Ancon Woman's Club met at the 
Hotel Tivoli on Wednesday, September 16, 
with an average attendance. The library 
committee reported through its chairman, 
Mrs. A. R. Bennet, the arrival of the books 
ordered. Through the courtesy of the 
Commission, these books were delivered free 
of all transportation charges. A special set 
of rules governing the librar}' will be drawn 
up and presented b)' the chairman at the 
next meeting, at which time the regular 
librarian will be appointed. The work of 
soliciting names for the Ancon Library 
Association is going on through a committee 
with one of the club women as chairman. 
Extensive plans are being made for the 
furtherance of the movement. The annual 
meeting will be held October 7. Owing to 
the absence of Dr. Van Kueber from the 
city, the lecture on the San Bias Indians 
was not given, but it is expected that he 
will give it later. 

The Gorgona club of the Daughters of 
Rebekah, the woman's auxiliary to the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, has been 
holding preparatory meetings for the com- 
pletioji of arraugements for the regular in- 
stitution which will be held October 10, at 
Fraternity Hall, Gorgona. There are nine 
card members, and there are thirty-one ap- 
plications for membership. 

The regular meeting of Trinitv Church 



Woman's Guild, Culebra, ^\'ill be held in the 
Commission Chapel, on Tuesday afternoon, 
October 6, at 3 o'clock. 



PERSONAL. 



Among the arrivals from the States on 
the Advance, on September 22, were Maj. 
Chester Harding, Mrs. Harding and three 
children. 

Among the passengers returning to the 
Isthmus on the AUianca on September 27 
were Mrs. H. J. Slifer, two daughters and 
son, of Colon, and Dr. G. H. Crabtree and 
family, of Culebra. 

Mr. Thomas L. Clear, of Chicago, formerly 
employed in the Washington office of the 
Isthmian Canal Commission, and more re- 
cently in the office of the Secretary of the 
Treasury, has been appointed Chief Clerk 
of the Division of Examiner of Accounts 
and has reported for duty on the Isthmus. 

Messrs. W. P. Ramsey, W. S. Dewhurst, 
W. C. Elridge, J. S. Wilmeth, and F. B. 
Warwick, of Washington, are on the Isthmus 
representing the Treasury Department in 
the transfer of the accounts and funds from 
the Disbursing Officer to the Canal Zone 
Treasurer. 

R. Yung has resigned as land agent of 
the Panama railroad, and since September 
23, all land matters have been handled in 
the office of the General Manager, where the 
land business will be transacted from this 
time forth. 



Obituary. 

Mr. Edwin Townsend, of St. Louis, Mo., 
died September 21, 1908, as a result of an 
accidental discharge of a rifle which he was 
cleaning in his room at Tabernilla, Septem- 
ber 21, 1908. He was thirty-three years of 
age, and had been on the Isthmus nineteen 
months. 



Examination for Stenograplier. 

An examination for the position of stenog- 
rapher in the service of the Isthmian Canal 
Commission will be held at Culebra, Canal 
Zone, in the office of the Chairman, on Sun- 
da)', October 25, beginning at 9 a.m. The 
application form and the pamphlet describ- 
ing the examination may be had upon ap- 
plication to John K. Baxter, Secretary, Isth- 
mian Civil Service Board, Culebra, Canal 
Zone. 



Information Wanted. 

A letter addres.sed to Emile Napoleon by 
his sister, a nun in Jerusalem, is held at the 
office of the Chairman. This man was em- 
ployed in the Department of Labor, Quarters 
and Subsistence up to September, 1906, but 
there is no record of his subsequent eniploj'- 
ment. An3one who knows of his where- 
abouts should communicate with The Canal 
Record. 

Rev. Henry Collins, Commission Chaplain, 
will speak in the Roman Catholic Church at 
Empire, at 9.30 o'clock, Sunday morning 
October 4, in the interest of the Church of 
the Holy Redeemer, Culebra. 



Lost— In Panama Sunday, September 20, 
pair of gold-bowed spectacles. Name of 
makers, A. J. Lloyd & Co., Boston, Mass., 
on case. Reward for return to D. F. Pyne, 
Gatun, C. Z. Possibly lost on beach North 
of P. R. R. station. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



37 



PSEOICTi .G FRESHETS. 

System by Whic'-i Danx^'i- from Cliagres 
Floods Is Aniicipated. 

The fact that most of the work from Mat- 
achiii to Gatuu, on the line of the Canal, is 
belo^v high stages of the Chagres River has 
made necessarj- the construction of dykes, as 
descrilied in The Canal Record of June 24, 
1908. Since the dykes are not high enough 
to protect the low areas against extreme 
floods, the Division of Meteorology and 
River Hydraulics was instructed to institute 
a system of predicting high water in order 
that opportunity might be given to remove 
any machinerj- that seemed to be in danger. 
It was important not only to give warning 
of floods, but also to avoid giving false 
alarm that might cause expensive delaj^s in 
the Canal work. 

Were it possible to estimate from a storm's 
rainfall the height to be reached in the river 
channel, twenty-four hours' warning might 
be given, but so manj' conditions affect the 
relation between rainfall and run-off that 
only a rough approximation of the probable 
height of a freshet can be predicted from the 
previous rainfall. 

The elements affecting the results are: 
The amount of rain, the rate of precipita- 
tion, the di.stribution of rain, the rate of 
run-off before the storm, and the previous 
degree of saturation of ground. It is clear 
that any system taking cognizance of all 
these elements must be complicated, even 
though the data were available to define 
them. The rainfall stations are not so lo- 
cated as to give a fair estimate of the rainfall 
over the whole basin, the area of the water- 
shed is only approximately known, and there 
are no means at hand of tracing the path of 
a storm. 

Frequently freshets come down the river 
without any previous warning in the shape 
of rainfall within the measured area; at other 
times what appears to be an alarming amount 
of rain \\'ill cause little or no rise in the 
river, showing that either the rain was 
above normal in the measured section and 
deficient in the unmeasured section, or that 
the ground was so dry as to absorb promptly 
the rain and retard its delivery to the river. 
The establishment of more rain gauges in 
the upper part of the valley would be a 
costly and impracticable undertaking, inas- 
much as each would have to be connected 
with headquarters by telephone, and would 
result in little good, for whatever system is 
used must be based on past records, and by 
the time enough records were collected" from 
the new gauges the need of this service 
would probably no longer exist. 

In view of these facts it is clear that the 
only basis from which a prediction can be 
made is the river itself. The rate of travel 
of a freshet wave depends on the location of 
the heaviest rain. Frequently the rise com- 
mences simultaneously at all stations, at 
other times the rise begins later at the 
lower stations, but the crest always passes 
the upper stations first at various intervals 
as shown below, making it possible to pre- 



dict high water at Gamboa, riT'.:'.:) 
several hours in advance. 



d Gatiin 



Station. 


■ Hours since 

crest passed 

El Vit'ia. 


i)!s'.ance 
from sea 
1 miles) . 


El Vi^ia 


u 


frt 




2 to 4 


54 


Gamboa 

Bohio 


5 to 7 

11 to 13 

1 1 7 to 19 


43 
16 

4 









It has been found that there are well de- 
fined relations between the rises at the sev- 
eral stations, as follows: 

Gamboa rise^l.3 X Alhajuela rise. 

Bohio rise=1.35 X Alhaiuela rise wheu Alhajuela 
is less than 11.5 feet. 

Bohio rise^Alhajuela rise -|- 4 feet when .Alhajuela 
is greater than 12.5 feet. 

Bohio rise=Gamboa rise when Gamboa is less than 
16.2 feet. 

Bohio rise=O.S X Gamboa rise -\- 4 feet when Gam- 
boa is greater than 16.2 feet. 

The xalues thus obtained give the number 
of feet the river will rise above the level 
at which it stood immediately preceeding the 
rise, and to refer to mean sea-level it is 
necessary to add them to the height at that 
time. It is believed that these results are 
sufficiently accurate for the purpose desired, 
as it rarely happens that the error is more 
than two orthree feet. Should the tributaries 
contribute an excessive amount of water the 
actual height will be greater than the pre- 
dicted height. If, on the other hand, they 
are less than norm.il, the predicted height 
will be too large. The formulas given above 
represent mean conditions and it is some- 
times possible to correct them bj- noting the 
distribution of rainfall. 

The table below shows the heights, actual 
and predicted, at Alhajuela, Gamboa, and 
Bohio during freshets of 1904, 1905, 1906, 
1907, and an idea of the accuracy of the 
method maj- be had therefrom. The El Vigia 
station has been established too recentlj- to be 
of much service this year, so it is not in- 
cluded in the table. With the 1908 records 
this station will be of great service next year 
in lengthening the time of warning. 



These two cases would not, in fact, have 
had errors so large as indicated in the ta- 
ble, for the Bohio prediction would have 
been corrected as the crest passed Gamboa, 
as follows in No. 5. The first prediction 
for Bohio is that the water will rise 10.1 
feet. Later as the crest passes Gamboa, the 
finst prediction is cancelled, and it is pre- 
dicted that the rise at Bohio will equal the 
rise at Gamboa, 14 feet. The actual height 
finally reached is 16.4 feet, the predicted 
height being in error 2.4 feet. 

The following table shows concisely the 
errors encountered in the use of the method 
just explained. 



Gamboa. 



Predic- 
tions in 

error j „ , „ . r I ^^ 

more ' Num- , Per cent of ' Num- 

than I ber. i all freshets. I ber. 



Per cent of 
all freshets. 



5 feet.... 

4 feet...., 2 

3 feet.... 2 

2 feet....' 5 

1 foot....! 13 
feet....! 



6.5 per cent 
6.5 per cent 
16.1 per cent 
42.0 per cent 
31 ' 100.0 per cent 



6 
10 
14 



6.5 per cent 

6.5 per cent 

19.4 per cent 

32.3 per cent 

45.2 iier cent 



31 I 100.0 per cent 



Having predicted the probable height of 
the river at the lower station it remains to 
determine at what hour the maximum will 
occur. The rate of travel of a freshet wave 
varies greatly even in those of the same 
magnitude. There seems, however, to be 
a relation between the duration of a rise at 
one station and that at another which rela- 
tion permits the time of the maximum to 
be estimated. 

I Gamboa duration— 1,5 X Alhajuela dura- 
. , ) tion. 
Kougniy j Bohio duratiou=1.5 X Gamboa duration 
\ =2.25 X Alhajuela duration. 

But the time of passage of crest is never 
less than 3 hours from Alhajuela to Gam- 
boa and 5 hours from Gamboa to Bohio, 
and should the time intervals as calculated 
bj- the above formulas be less, 3 and 5 should 
be used instead. To get the probable time 
the maximum will occur at Gamlx)a, it is 
only necessary to add the calculated dura- 



RISES AT ALHAJUELA, GAMBOA AND BOHIO— ACTUAL AND PREDICTED. 



Alha- 

jnELA. ' 



Bohio. 



1 
2 
3 
4 

5 
6 

7 
S 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
IS 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
25 
29 
3D 
31 



Rise. ; Actual I ^f^^ 



September 4, 1904 

September 5-6, 1904... 
September 9-10. 1904... 

November 6-7 , 1904 

June 9-10, 1905 

May 21-22. 1905 

October 20-21. 1905 

October 29-30. 1905 

December 3-4-5. 1906.. 

Mav 9-10. 1907 

May 24-25, 1907 

June7-S, 1907 

June 20-21, 1907 

June 21-22. 1907 

June 22-23, 1907 

July 12-13, 1907 

July 13-14. 1907 

August JO-21, 1907 

August 21-22. 1907 . . . . 
September 3-4. 1907... 
September 20, 1907.... 
September 21-22. 1907 . 

September 25. 1907 

September 30. 1907 

October 5-6. 1907 

October 11-12. 1907.... 
October 15-16. 1907.... 

October 17, 1907 

October 19-20, 1907.... 
November 12-13, 1907.. 
December 7, 1907 



7.3 
7.5 
2.7 

13.0 
7.5 
8.2 
7.0 
9.0 

24.5 
S.9 
6.5 
8.3 
4.1 
5.1 
2.8 
5.5 
9.0 
3.9 
5.4 
5.1 
6.5 
2.9 
8.1 
2.0 
4.3 
4.6 
3.9 
5.0 
2.8 
8.6 

12.4 



Error. 



Rise. 



Error. 



_ Actual ' ^?^^\ 
dieted I 



8.1 


9.5 


9.7 


9.8 


6.5 


3.5 


16.5 


16.9 


14.0 


9.8 


11.3 


10.7 


13.4 


9.1 


8.8 


11.1 


31.4 


31.8 


10.2 


11.6 


7.6 


8.4 


S.6 


10.8 


4.6 


5.3 


6.8 


6.6 


3.7 


3.6 


6.0 


7.2 


13.1 


11.7 


4.1 


5.1 


8.6 


7.0 


6.0 


6.6 


9.6 


8.4 


3.9 


3.8 


9.4 


10.5 


3.4 


2.6 


6.2 


5.6 


6.4 


6.0 


4.7 


IS.l 


7.6 


6.5 


4.1 


3.6 


10.6 


11.2 


16.4 


16.1 



1.4 
0.1 



2.3 
0.4 
1.4 
0.8 
2.2 
0.7 



1.0 
' 0.6 ' 



1.1 



4.2 
0.6 
4.3 



0.2 
0.1 



1.2 
0.1 

' o.s' 

0.6 
0.4 

"I'.i' 
0.5 



0.3 



9.9 


9.8 


8.7 


10.1 


7.6 1 


3.6 


17.4 


17.0 


16.4 i 


10. 1 


11.9 , 


11.1 


15.6 


9.4 


8.5 


12.1 


29.5 


28.5 


10.3 


12.0 


8.3 


8.8 


8.0 


11.2 


5.1 


5.5 


7.0 


6.9 


3.9 


3.8 


6.0 


7.4 


13.0 


12.1 


4.4 


5.3 


9.7 


7.3 


6.4 


6.9 


10.4 


8.8 


3.8 


3.9 


S.7 


11.0 


5.4 


2.7 


5.0 


5.8 


5.8 


6.1 


3.2 


5.3 


7.3 


6.8 


4.8 


3.8 


8.4 


11.6 


17.0 


16.7 



+ 


- 




0.1 


1.4 






4.0 




0.4 




6.3 




0.8 




6.2 


3.6 






1.6 


1.7 




0.5 




3.2 




0.4 






0.1 




0.1 


1.4 






0.9 


0.9 




2.4 


0.5 






1.6 


0.1 




2.3 






2.7 


0.8 


1 


:o.3 




2.1 


1 .... 




.0.5 




1.0 


3.2 






0.3 



It will be seen that, with the exception of 
Nos. 5 and 7 at Bohio, there are no errors 
large enough to be of much importance. 



tion to the time the rise commenced at Gam- 
boa. 

The following brief example (Freshet No. 



38 



THE CANAL RECORD 



19, August 21-22, 1907) will perhaps make 
more clear the use of this method. The 
arithmetical processes are shown in paren- 
theses, and are not included in the predict- 
ing message. 

Phoue ines.saije from .\lhajuela al s ji. in.; 

"River now 99.S. Cre.st. Rose from 94.1 since .^ 
p. ni." 

Phone message from Gamboa at 8 p. m.: 

" River now 50.5. Rising". Rose from 4S.3 since 5 
p. m." 

Prediction at .S.IO p. m.: 

" RivnR WILL RISK .-VT C.AMnOA (5.4X1.3) 7 FEET. 
RK.VLHI-N-i; ST.\r,H (48..1-f7.0) 55.3. at ABOUT U p. M." 

In predicting the time it was found that 
the calculated duration at Gamboa added to 
the time the rise began would make the 
crest less than three hours later than the 
crest at Alhajuela, so the calculated duration 
was rejected and the time of maximum was 
assumed as three hours later than Alhajuela. 
The actual rise at Gamboa was 8.6 feet, 
reaching stage 56.9 at midnight, the pre- 
dicted height being 1.6 feet too low, and 
the predicted time of maximum one hour 
too soon. The effective time of warnin,g was 
2 hours and 50 minutes. For larger freshets 
the time of warning will be materially 
greater. Freshet No. 19 was not large 
enough to cause an}' damage. 

At each station an electric gong, so ad- 
justed as to sound whenever the river rises 
above a certain point, has been installed in 
the sleeping quarters of the observer. A 
continuous record of the river heights is kept 
by means of automatic registers and these 
curves afford very complete data, so far as the 
main stream is concerned, from which to 
study the freshets. The errors in results 
obtained by this system could be materially 
reduced were the tributaries to be observed. 
It is doubtful if the extra expense would be 
justified as it would very rarely happen that 
an error in prediction of three feet would 
have any effect on the precautionary mea- 
sures. 

The system herein described is largely a 
matter of experiment and some modification 
of the formulas used may result from fur- 
ther data. No literature on the subject in 
the English language was available. A 
paper in the "Annales des Fonts et Chaus- 
s6es," of May, 1889, by M. Allard, a French 
engineer, was found and was of great assist- 
ance. His system is similar to the above, 
but more elaborate. By means of the heights 
of the various tributaries and the relations 
the}' had to each other, he was able to pre- 
dict with surprising accuracy the flood 
heights of the River Seine at Paris. 



Gold Hill and Balboa Hill. 

The Canal Record: 

Will you kindly advise, either by letter or 
through the The Canal Record, the height 
of Balboa Hill, opposite Gorgona, and Gold 
Hill at Culebra, and what is the highest 
point in the Zone? 

Very truly yours, 

J. E. Crutcher. 
Cristobal, September 11, 1908. 

[According to recent surveys Gold Hill is 
607 feet high. According to the map and 
profile prepared for the Panama railroad b\' 
George M. Totten, in 1855, based on the 
survey by Thomas Harrison, Crown surveyor 
of Jamaica, Balboa Hill (Cerro Grande) is 
1,000 feet high. There is no map, or survey 
so far as is known, that gives information as 
to what is the highest point in the Zone]. 



LETTERS FROM THE LINE. 

An Open Letter. 

Ancon, September 22, 1908. 
To the Employes of the Division of Meteoyolosy and 
River Hydraulics : 

Although, as far as you are personally 
concerned, I feel that it is unnecessary for 
me to express in words the high regard 
in which I hold each and everyone of you, 
for the loyal support I have received from 
you during the time I have been at the 
head of the Division of Meteorology and 
River Hydraulics, I deem it my duty to do 
so publicly, so that it may be known that 
whatever degree of success or efficiency the 
■work under my charge has attained has been 
primarily due to the close unity existing be- 
tween us and to the intelligence and faith- 
fulness displayed by each of you in the work 
under your immediate care. 

Of the heads of the three sections into 
which our work is divided, I must say that 
in all my engineering practice I have never 
found such loyalty, con.sistent support, in- 
terest in the -work and desire to advance its 
progress, as they have shown me, entailing, 
consequentlv, the full confidence of our su- 
periors in the -H'ork entrusted to our care. 
These faithful companions I shall always 
hold in my memory with respect and grati- 
tude. 

My interest in our work will not disap- 
pear with my separation frotn the service, 
and I feel confidetit that I will see by its 
continued success that you are rendering to 
my successor the same loyal support jou 
have always given me. 

I desire here to express my high apprecia- 
tion of the moral support and encourage- 
ment I have always received from the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission in the orgafiization 
and execution of the work of this division; 
al.so of the kind and generous assistance 
rendered me b}- Gen. Henry L. Abbot during 
the entire time I have been in charge of this 
work. 

In closing these lines, I must say that it 
has been most painful to me to be obliged, 
on account of ni}- health, to sever my con- 
nection with the work of the Isthmiati Ca- 
nal Commission, a work iti which I have 
spent my best energies, and in the ultimate 
success of which, under the American flag, 
my faith has never left me for a moment, 
even in the days of greatest doubt. 

Ricardo M. Arango, 

Division Engineer. 



Civic Pride Hindrances. 

The Canal Record: 

At the conclusion of the work of the com- 
mittee sent from the United States to report 
upon economic and social conditions exist- 
ing in the Canal Zone, one of its members 
addressed a public gathering at the Com- 
mission clubhouse, Cristobal. In the course 
of his remarks he took occasion to remind 
the sojourners of the "Atlantic City," upon 
whom the Government of the United 
States is conferring many benefits in the 
way of homes and equipment and furnish- 
ings, that .some little duty seemed but nat- 
ural in return in the way of assuming civic 
pride, citing in particular the need of set- 
tees for the water front along Palm avenue. 
While there has been no concerted action 



looking to the accomplishment of this sug- 
gestion, there are those among the Govern- 
ment's beneficiaries who are endeavoring to 
do their part toward making the city as at- 
tractive and beautiful as their individual ef- 
forts will bring about. 

On five separate occasions the writer has 
planted a flower bed about the door \'ard of 
the quarters assigned him. 

Thrice these flowers have been destroyed 
by .goats that are allowed the privileges of 
"The Cabbage Patch," as the section has 
been designated. 

Once a good soul, a lover of flowers who 
would etnbellish his own surroundings at 
little effort and expense, came to the flo-wer 
bed in the dark hours of the night, carry- 
ing awa}' with him every plant— root and 
bratich. 

The good soul who helped himself is 
more than welcome if he will only add 
something of grace to his heart, as it is 
hoped he may do in the way of adorning 
his flower garden. 

Once the ants and goats together de- 
vastated the garden. 

Thrice the goats have been reported to 
the Police Department. 

These are serious hindrances to civic 
pride, not alone from a monetary stand- 
point, but they tend to take the vim out of one, 
especially when he has to tramp long miles 
after the beauties of the woods and swamps 
and cliffs. 

The bed has again been planted. Now, 
how am I to depend upon results against 
such odds as ravenous goats, hoarding ants, 
and the dark man ? 

Civic Pride. 

Cristobal, September 5, 1908. 



Bmpire Christian League, 

To All Concerned : 

At the regular business meeting of the 
Empire Christian League the follomng 
action was taken and resolutions adopted : 

Whereas, The people of Empire, realizing 
the necessity of having a church home, pe- 
titioned the Chairman and Chief Engineer 
of the Isthmian Canal Commission for the 
provision of same, therefore, be it 

Resolved, That a vote of thanks be ex- 
tended to the Chairman and Chief Engineer 
for the prompt action in and having erected 
such a building ; therefore, be it further 

Resolved, That copies of same be for- 
warded to the Chairman and Chief Engi- 
neer, The Canal Record, the press, and 
spread on the minutes of the League. 
Very respectfull}', 

J. FoRJiAN, President, 
F. W. Conner, Secretary, 

Committee on Resolutions. 

Empire, September 28, 1908. 

A Hose Company Race. 

The Canal Record: 

Gatun volunteer company. No. 1, of the 
Canal Zone Fire Department, challenges 
any volunteer company of the Zone to a 
"hub to hub" contest to be held at Cristo- 
bal. Arrangements relative to rules, date, 
prizes, etc. , to be made by a committee rep- 
resenting cotitestants. 

Kindly address all conmiunications to 
Chas. Willett, 
Foreman Gatun l^olunteer Company. 

Gatun, September 23, 1908. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



39 



OFnC[AL CIRCULARS. 

Depot Qaartemiaster. 

CuLEBRA. September IS. 19ns. 
Circular No. 211. 

Capt. Courtland Nixon, havitig^ reported for duty, 
is hereby assigned as Depot Quartermaster at Mount 
Hope, reporting to Maj. C, A. Devol, Chief Quarter- 
master. 

Geo. W. Goethals. 

Chairman. 

Board of Survey and Appraisal Abolished. 

CuLEBRA, September 12. 19ns. 
Circular No. 210. 

In accordance with the resolution adopted by tlie 
Commission at its 147th meeting, the Board of Sur- 
vey and Appraisal is hereby abolished. 

All records and unfinished business of the Board of 
Survey and Appraisal will be transferred to the Sur- 
vey Officer for the Isthmian Canal Commission. 

Tlie duties of the Survc.\- Officer will hereafter be 
performed in accordance with the provisions of Cir- 
cular No. 1, Quartermaster's Department, and he 
will forward iiis reports direct to this office for ..c- 
tion. 

H. F. Hodges. 
Acting Ckaiffnan and Chief Ensinecr. 



Storehouses at La Boca aud Cristobal. 

CuLEBRA, September 28, 190S. 
Circular No. 212. 

On October 1. 190S. the storehouse now operated by 
the Quartermaster's Department at La Boca will be 
turned over to the Division Engineer of the Pacific 
Division, with all supplies contained therein, and 
necessary forces. 

Effective the same date : The storehou.se operated 
by the Quartermasters Department at the Dry Dock 
at Cristobal will be turned over to the Division Kn- 
e^ineer of the Atlantic Division, with all supplies con- 
l.iined therein, and necessary forces. 

H. F. Hodges, 
Acting Ckaifinan and Chief Engineer. 



Tei.p.i;»ie Calls, Chief Quartermaster's 
Office. 

Culebra, September 22, 19U8. 
To All Concerned : 

You are informed that a private telephone switch- 
board has been installed in this office, connecting 
telephones as follows : 

Maj. C. A. Devol, Chief Quartermaster. 

Lieut. R. E- Wood. Assistant Chief Quartermaster. 

C. H. Mann. Chief Clerk. 

Max Dyer, in general charge of matters pertaining 
to material and supplies. 

Harry Leonard, in charge of United States requisi- 
tions. 

H. T. Bosse, Chief Timekeeper. 

M. B. Huff, in charge of contract laborers' records 
and vouchers. 

D. H. Beaman. in charge of property returns. 
H. S. Farish, Acting Surveying Officer. 

C. C. Cameron. Chief File Clerk. 

C. S. Todd, Accountant. 

In calling the office of the Chief Quartermaster, 
after connection has been secured with operator of 
private switchboard, name of person with whom it 
is desired to speak should be given. If it is not 
known wl o has charge of tlie particular business re- 
garding v. liich call is made, the nature of the busi- 
ness should be stated to the operator, who will make 
the propc^^r connection. 

C. A. Devol, 
Chief O'tctrterfnaster. 



Hxaminatlon oi Accounts. 

Empire. September 22, 1908. 
Circular No. 4. 

The following instructions, in order to carry into 
effect the pro\'isions of the Chairman s Circular No. 
lS3ii,of August 27, 1908. are issued for the informa- 
tion of all departments and divisions : 

Pay-rolh — Pay-rolls for serWces rendered in the 
month of September will be sent to the Examiner of 
Accounts in the form they have heretofore been sent 
.o the Disbursing Officer — that is, one copy of the 
li.:ie and pay-roll aud one copy of the pay-roll, ac- 
c.i:ipanicd by the unsigned pay receipts. These 
pa: c.s si'ould be sent on the first day of October, or 
as soo;: ll.creafter as practicable, and in no case later 
than ti.e fifth. The Examiner of Accounts and Dis- 
bursii. ,' :.Tu"ei will retain the pay receipts of each 
department and division until all pay receipts, in- 
cluding bctii t'o'd aud silver rolls of that department 
or division, a.e ready for issue. 

Bepint.ii.g with October 1, 190S. each time-keeping 
office will keep for its office record the present form 
of Xinie and pay-roll, and will make an original and 
dupl.c-ileof the pay-roll. These original and dupli- 



cate pay-rolls will, on November 1, 190.S, and each 
month thereafter, be sent with the pay receipts, to 
the Examiner of Accoiuits. 

Bunds — Beginning October 1, 1908. all surety bonds 
of employes of the Isthmi;in Canal Commission, ex- 
cept employes of the Department of Disbursements 
who handle money for which the Disbursing Officer 
is responsible, will run in favor of the I'nited States. 
Such emplo>'es as timekeepers, custodian of cou- 
pon books for issue to employes, those bonded for 
the purpose of witnessing signatures to pay receipts, 
etc.. will be transferred to the schedule bond in f;ivor 
of the United States. This change from one bond to 
another will be made by the Examiner of Accounts, 
and no action on the part of other Departments or 
Divisions will b? necessary. All records will be 
kept by the Examiner and all correspondence relat- 
ing to this .subject should be addressed to him. Sub- 
sequent to the above date, heads of Departments and 
Divisions should report at the close of each month 
all changes in the status or location of bonded em- 
ployes, during the month, and in case of separations 
from the service should state whetlier or not the 
employe satisfactorily accounted for all money or 
property. Prompt advice should be given to the 
Examiner of any suspected irregularity or shortage 
in the accounts of any bonded emplo.\e. Application 
forms for employes whom it is desired to bond will be 
furnished by the Examiner on request. 

Coupon Bonks — Timekeepers and others charged 
with thecustody and issue of coupon books and meal 
tickets, will make requisition therefor upon the 
Examiner of Accounts. When the requisition has 
been entered and approved in the Examiner's office, 
it will be sent to the Disbursing Officer, who will 
issue the coupon books and meal tickets As re- 
quired by Circular No. 183h. paragraph 5. time- 
keepers and others receivitig such books and tickets 
will render a monthly account therefor to the Ex- 
aminer. 

Misceilaneous Reports — The general books of the 
Commission will be kept in the Examiner's office, 
wliere all accounting work involving expenditures of 
money and the checking of reports, will be done. 
All reports affecting the accounts heretofore sent to 
the Disbursing Officer will be sent to the Examiner, 
and all correspondence had with the Examiners 
office, except in the case of questions involving act- 
ual payments of accounts or the deposit of moneys 
belonging to the Commission. 

Bilis /?eceiz'ad/f-—A.s provided by Circular No. 1S3h. 
bills issued by all Departments aud Divisions will be 
sent to the Examiner of Accounts. The list of such 
claims heretofore sent to the Examiner may be dis- 
continued. 

W. W. Warwick. 
Examiner (ifAcconnt.s, 

Approved: 
Geo. W. Goethals. 
Chaijynan. 



Notice to P. R. R. Tenants, Colon, R. P. 

Colon. September 22. 190S. 

The Committee appointed by the Chairman of the 
Commission to consider the complaints made by the 
various lessees of lots in the city of Colon, will again 
resume their meetings on or about November 2. Due 
notice of the meeting will be issued. 

H. J. Slifer. 
General Manager. 



UNCLAIMED PACKAGES. 



The following is a list of packages that 
have been forwarded from New York to 
Isthmian Canal Commission and Panama 
railroad employes, and that are waiting to 
be claimed at the freight house at Colon. 
The owners of these packages will have to 
make application for free customs entry in 
connection with Circular No. 85, or iti the 
alternative, pay duty to the Panama Gov- 
ernment customs on the value of the con- 
tents of the packages, before delivery can 

be effected: ^, 

Charges 
to colled. 

No. 7232— J. W. 1-oulks. Colon. 1 parcel, cr 
Dnnottai Castle: September 30. 1907 prepaid 

No. 7622— Frederick White. Cristobal. 1 par- 
cel, ex Advance: May 16. 1908 prepaid 

No. 7564 — Mayer Unterberg. Panama. 1 par- 
cel, ex Esfieranza : April 13 190S prepaid 

No: 7723— W. D. Wallman (or Waltman). 
Cristobal, 1 parcel, e.v Panama: July 9. 190S. prepaid 

No. 7762— Richard F. Bowlby (or Boidelbuy) . 
Gorgona, 1 i>iirce\. ex Allianca : August 9. 
1908 prepaid 



COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES. 

Activities of the Youag Men's Christian 
Association. 

REPORT FOR AUGUST, 1908. 

Total membership j ^^g 

Totiil number of bowling Karnes 4 943 

Total number pool and billiard games 13.U0S 

Number conlej^tants in pool tonrnaments t.5 

ToUil income from soda fountain 51.678 04 

Number of different men using g-ymnasium... " 104 
Number of men enrolled in systematic gym- 
nasium class work 5^ 

Number basketball games 5 

Number enrolled in chess and checker clubs... 78 

Number che.ss contests 5 

Number enrolled in glee clubs 30 

Number enrolled in dramatic and minstrel 

clubs .0 

Number enrolled in orchestras 14 * 

Number enrolled in Bible class 12 

Number enrolled in educational classes t4 

Number of members of library (^5 

Total number of books withdrawn 1,331 

Number of imported entertainments 10 

Attendance j 7_^,j 

Number of local entertainments """ 6 

Attendance occ 

Number of functions outside Association man- 
agement... ^,, 

Attendance ^^q 

Number of afternoons for women 26 

Attendance ,"^4 

Number of evening functions to which women 

were i n\'i ted 32 

Attendance , 152 

Number of letters written at public tables 5!670 

Total attendance at building 36.245 

Average attendance per day I'l^g 

BOYS- DEPARTMENT (aGES 10 TO 16). 

Numberof members 4^ 

Number afternoons open to boys S2 

Totiil attendance 4^5 

Attendance at gymnasium exercises 395 

EMPIRE. 
Empire defeated Gorgona at bowling on Saturday 
evening. September 19. on the Gorgona alleys with a 
score of 2tol. Pin fall— Empire. 854. S12 875- Gor- 
gona. 827. S27. SOS. 

The landscape gardener is engaged in beautifying 
the grounds about the clubhou.se. 

Fifty new b,-w)ks have just been ordered for the 
library and are e.vpected to arrive in about three 
weeks. Alterations are being made in the office for 
the accommodation of the entire library which, when 
completed, will consi.st of about l.O(X) volumes. The 
number now is 700, 



Concert by the I. C. C. Band. 

HOTEI^ TrV0I,I. ANCON. 

Sunday. October 4. 190S. at 7.30 p. m.: 

PROGRAM. 

1 March— .S(7«^^(z^(? Flynn Morse 

2 Overture— Art.s7,v^c// Kehir Bela 

3 \\ii\tz~.\roonlight on the Hudson Herman 

4 C -S". Army Lancers Tobani 

5 Medley Selection— (^/'o. IVashington. /r.. ..Cohan 

6 Barytone Ao\o~ Let all Obey teach 

D. E, NORCROSS. 

( a VoW^a—yyornfiifie Smith 

7 t> Schottische— £c/ A/e Be Your Umou 

' (^oon Allen 

S Selection— r/ff >?crf Mill Herbert 

9 Descriptive— /«(f/(zw War Dance Bell.stedt 

10 Galop— yi-Zc/HatVi/zj Ben net 

Chas. E. jKSTi ly gs. Musical Director. 
A concert will be given at Empire. C. Z.. Sunday. 
October 1 1 . ___^__ 

Misdirected Letters. 

Division of Dead I^etters. 
Ancon, C. 7... September 30. 1S»08. 

The following insufficiently addressed letters, origi- 
nating in the United States and its pos.sessions. have 
been received in the office of the Director of Posts, 
and may be obtained on request of addressee: 
Bealler, Archie McNulty, Louis 

Bentley. E. A. O'Dea. William 

Bnigham. J. Robinson. A, I,. 

Daley. Tom Roguebert. l^urent 

Davis. John S. Root. William F. S. 

<;oulstone. Arthur Rowe. A. 

Hunt. Emma Schroeder. H. F 

I.ohing. J. G. Sheakley. Fred E- 

Mackie, Samuel Wallace. Joe 

Michelbaugh. Bernard Waterworth. C. E. 
Murling. Dai. 



40 



THE CANAL RECORD 



COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT. 
NOTICE. 

Cristobal, C. Z., September 29, 1908. 
Effective October 1 : All coininunicatioiis 
intended for either the Subsistence Depart- 
ment, I. C. C. or the Commissary Depart- 
ment, P. R. R., should be addressed to the 
Subsistence OfEcer, Cristobal, C. Z. 

Mai. Eugene T. Wii^on, 

.Sii/'.^rsfCTia' OjTifrr. 
COMMISSARY PRICES 

I'or wt-ek bcidnuiiig September 29 : 
I'RESH MEATS. 

P>iif. 

ilmtuii — .Stewiiifi: per lb 6 

Shoulder and neck (not under 

6 pounds) perlh 7 

Entire forecjnarter (not under 

10 pound.s) per lb S 

I^K (s to 111 pounds) per lb 16 

Short-cut chops per lb 20 

Umib— StemuK r. per lb 6 

Entire forequarter per lb S 

I.ei; (6to8pouuds) per lb 27 

Chops per lb 29 

Ve.-il— Stewing- per lb 10 

Entire forequarter (15 to 20 lbs). ...per lb 11 

I.oin per lb 22 

Short-cut chops per lb 23 

Cutlets per lb 23 

Pork— Cuts per lb 20 

Beef— Suet per lb 4 

Soup per lb 8 

Stew per lb 12 

Conied per lb., 12. 14. 16 

Rib-roast, second cut (not under 3 

pounds) per lb 19 

Kih-roast. short cut (not under V/2 

pounds) per lb 23 

Sirloin roast per lb 29 

Rump roa.st per lb 29 

Porterhou.se roast per lb 29 

Steak, round per lb 23 

Rib per lb 24 

Sirloin iier lb 29 

Porterhouse per lb 29 

Rump per lb 29 

Tenderloin per lb 30 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Livers— Beef "■ per lb Wi 

Calf ■ each 60 

Sansaiie- Pork per lb 19 

Frankfurter per lb 13 

I.,eberwurst per lb 15 

Bologna per lb 15 

Sweet bread— Veal each 1.20 

• Beef perlb 25 

Ox tonjrues e.ach 90 

Pies' feet, pickled per lb 11 

PiKs' tonirues, pickled per lb 15 

Eggs, fresh dozen M 

POULTRY AND GAME. 

Chicken.s— Dressed (milk-fed) each l.,30 

I/irse I milk-fed) each 1.65 

Capons each 2.40 

Broilers each ■ 60 

Fowls, medium and large each. 80c. and 1.00 

Ducks, fatted I fancy) e.ach 1.10 

Suckling i>igs each 4.90 

Turkeys perlb .30 

.Squabs each 45 

CURED AND PICKLED MEATS. 

B,acou— Strips perlb 23 

English, breakfast .sliced per lb §26 

Ilatn — Sugar-cured, sliced perlb §25 

One-half, for boiling per lb §21 

Westphalia per lb 45 

Ferris perlb 20 

Beef, salt, family perlb 16 

Salt pork perlb 13 

D.'VIRY PRODUCTS. 

Butter — Prints. i)rime iiuality perlb 3i 

Cheese — Roquefort perlb 45 

Yo\mg .America perlb 22 

Swiss per lb 33 

Edam each 1.05 

Camembert per lb 2S 

Mcl^ren's... jar 15 

Pinxler's tin 22 

French cheese in tins — Camembcrl, Roque- 
fort, Brie, Neufchatel tin 20 

Buttermilk quart 15 

Milk, Briarcliff quart 25 



VEGETABLES AND FRUITS. 

Tomatoes (local only) ner lb 

Lettuce per lb 

White potatoes perlh 

Sweet potjitoes ...i)er lb 

Cabbage per lb 

Onions — ^ per lb 

Cucumbers per lb 

S<iuash (summer) iier lb 

Green com dozen 

Limes hundred 

Lemons dozen 

Oranges dozen 

Cantelonpes each 

Grapes per- lb 



2V2 
4 

31/= 
6 
3 
26 
40 
24 
IS 
10 
10 



§ Sold only fioiii cold-storage and not from Coni- 
luissaries 

NEW ARTICLES. 

frrce. 

Mats, cocoa. <loor, 22x36-inch.... each $2.00 

Berry bowls. S-inch each 25 

Glasses, cocktail each 8 

Plates, T-inch each 12 

Parasols each 1.50 

Beds. iron, single. No. 365 each 2.50 

lleds. iron, double. No. 360 each 3.50 

Beds, iron, double. No. 295 e;ich 6.75 

Shoe.s — Velour calf , Christy ties pair 5.50 

:\Iilwaukee kid, Eng. oxf pair 5.50 

Glazed kid, bals pair 5.75 

Pat. Cold Yale lies pair 6.00 

Pat. calf pumps pair 5.50 



Soldiers, Sailors, and Marines. 

All ex-soldiers, sailors, and marines, regu- 
lars and volunteers, now residing on the 
the Isthmus, are requested to send in their 
names, to lie included in the roster, or di- 
rectory of ex-service men on the Isthmus of 
Panama, which is being compiled by Birt S. 
Sturtevant Garrison, No. 41. Regular Army 
and Navy Union, U. S. \. Full name, date 
of enlistment, date of discharge, name of 
organization in which service was rendered. 
Isthmian address and home address should 
be furnished. 

Paul D. May, Commander. 

Sojourners' Lodge, No. 874, A. F. and A. 
M., will meet at its hall in Colon, on Satur- 
day, Octobers, 1908, at 7.30 p. m., in or- 
dinary communication. Masons in good 
standing are fraternally invited to be present. 

The United Fruit Company's third new 
ship, Heridia, will arrive in Colon in time 
to sail for New Orleans on October 6, at 
1.30 o'clock in the afternoon. The Heridia 
is a sister ship to the Cartago and Paris- 
Diiim, and is equipped with a modern wire- 
less outfit. 



.\ coal tre.stle is being constructed in tlie 
Panama railroad yard at Panama to aid in 
the rapid coaling of locomotives. Coal will 
be dumped from the cars through the trestle, 
and from the pile beneath the trestle will be 
loaded upon the tenders by a crane assigned 
to this work. 



Trains on the Panama railroad will enter 
Gatun by the old line from Mindi, and will 
stop at the old station, for a few weeks, un- 
til the trestle on the relocated line has been 
filled. From the old station at Gatun trains 
will run on to the relocated line at the north 
end of the Gatuncillo fill by a cross-over 
track recently completed. 



-■Ml but one mile of the roadbed on the 
relocation of the Panama railroad, between 
Barbacoas and Gamboa bridges, a distance 
of seven miles, has been completed, and tres- 
tles now being driven are rapidly closing 
up the gap. This section of the work has 
been done within a year by a comparatively 
small force of men. 



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS. 

'fhe following is a list of the sailings of the Pnn- 
^'ina Railroad Steamshii) Company, of the Royal 
Mail Steam Packet Company, of the Hamburg- 
.\incrican Line, and of the United Fruit Company's 
Line, the Panama Railroad Company's dates being 
subject to change : 

I'RUM XKW YORK TO COLON. 

Einance P. R. R.Saturday Sept. 26 

Prinzjoachim H.-.\ S.aturday ....Sept. 26 

Esperanza P. R. R. Thursday Oct. 1 

.Atrato R.-M Saturday Oct. 3 

Advance P. U. R.Wednesday ..Oct. 7 

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm...H.-A .Saturday Oct. 10 

Colon P. R. R.Monday Oct. 12 

Trent R.-M .Saturday Oct. 17 

Prinz Joac'.iim .'...11. -A Saturday Oct. 24 

Tagus R.-M Saturdaj' Oct. 31 

Prinz .\ug. V,' '.helm.. .H. -A Saturday Nov. 7 

Magdalena R.-M S,aturday Nov. 14 

Piinz Joachi H.-A Saturday Nov. 21 

Orinoco R.-M Saturday Nov. 28 

Atrato R.-JI Saturday Dec. 12 

Trent R.-M Saturday Dec. 26 

All the steamers of the Hamburg- .\merican and 
Royal Mail lines call at Kingston enroute to Colon. 

FROM COLON' TO NEW YORK. 



2) 



13 
13 
19 
20 
27 
3 
10 
17 
24 



Prinz .^ug. \Vilhelm...II.-.\ ... -Tuesday Sept. 

AUianca P. R. R. Saturday Oct. 

Clyde R.-M. . . .Tuesday Oct. 

Fin.ance P. R. R.Thursday .. ..Oct, 

P.anama P. R. R. Tuesday Oct. 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Tuesday ....Oct. 

Advance P. R. R.Monday Oct. 

T.agns R.-,\I Tuesday Oct. 

Prinz Aug. WiIhelni...H.-A Tuesday Oct. 

Magdalena R.-M:. ...Tuesday Nov. 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Tuesday Nov. 

Orinoco R.-M Tuesday Nov. 

Prinz Aug. Willielm...H.-.'^ Tuesday Nov. 

Atrato R.-M Tuesday Dec. 1 

Prinzjoachim H.-A Tuesday Dec. 8 

Trent R.-M Tuesday ....Dec. 15 

I.-ROM yV.W ORLE.\NS TO COLON. 

Heridia U.F.C.. Saturday Sept. 26 

Cartago U.F.C.. Saturday Oct. 3 

Parismina U.F.C.. Saturday Oct. 10 

Heridia U.F.C.. Saturday Oct. 17 

Cartago ; U.F.C.. Saturday Oct. 24 

Pari.smina U.F.C.. Saturday Oct. 31 

Heridia U.F.C.. Saturday Nov. 7 

Cartago U.F.C... Saturday Nov. 14 

Parismina U.F.C. ..Saturday Nov. 21 

Heridia U.F.C. ..Saturday Nov. 28 

FROM COLON TO NEW ORLEANS. 

Heridia U.F.C. .Tuesday Oct. 6 

Cartago U.F.C. .Tuesday ....Oct. 13 

Parismina U.F.C. Tuesday Oct. 20 

Heridia U.F.C. .Tuesday Oct. 27 

Cartago U.F.C. .Tuesday Nov. 3 

Parismina U.F.C. .Tuesday ....Nov. 10 

Heridia U.F.C. .Tuesday Nov. 17 

Cartago U.F.C. .Tuesday Nov. 24 

Parismina U.F.C, .Tuesday Dec. 1 

The Panama railroad steamships sail at 3 p. m 
from dock at Cristobal direct to New York. 

The Prinz steamers of the Hamlrarg-.\meiican line 
.sail from Colon at 1 p, m. via Kingston, Jamaica, 
for New York. 

.All Royal :\Iailsteamers meiitionedabove leave early 
in the morning from Colon via Kingston, Jamaica, 
for New "S-ork. All mail and passengers should be 
on board early on day of sailing. 

The steamers of the United Fruit Company's line 
sail from New Orleans at 11 a. m.. and from Colon 
at 1.30 p. m.. via Port Limon, for New Orleans, In 
addition to the above, the United Fniit Company 
dispatches a steamer about every ten days from 
Colon, via IJocas del Toro, for New Orleans. 

Sailings of the French line (Cie. G^n^rale Trans- 
atlantique) for Venezuelan ports, Martinique and 
f'.uadeloupe on the 3d and 20th of e;ich month. 



The following steamers have recently arrived at La 
Boca: September 19, California, from Valparaiso: 
September 20, Quito, from Buenaventura ; September 
25, San Juan, from San Francisco. Departures were : 
September 19, Ecnadoy. for Buenaventura ; ,Septem- 
ber22, Limari, for Valparaiso: September 26, .Aca- 
pulco. for San Francisco. 



Two turnstiles will be added to the two 
now provided at the Panama railroad station 
in Panama, as exits for first class passen- 
gers. 



CANAL 




RECORD 



Volume II. 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1908. 



No. 6. 



The Canal Record 



Published weekly under the authority and supervision of the 
ISTHMIAN CANAL COMMISSION 

"The Canal Record" is issued Jree oj charge, one 
copy each, to all employes of the Commission and Pan- 
ama Railroad Company whose 7iames areon the" gold" 
roll. Extra copies can be obtained from the neius 
stands ef the Panama Raihoad Company for fve cents 
each 

Address all Communications 

THE CANAL RECORD 

Ancon, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama. 

No communication , either Jor publication or request- 
i)tg injormation, will receive attention unless signed 
with tlw /ull tzame and address of the writer. 

NOTES OF PROGRESS. 

Canal Record lode*. 

.\n alphabetical index of Vol. I, of The 
Canal Record has been compiled and 
printed in form suitable for binding wnth 
the issues of the paper for the year. A lim- 
ited number of copies is available for per- 
sons who desire to preserve The Record in 
book form. Application, stating full name 
and position in the service, should be made 
at the office of The Canal Record. 



Lock Excavation Belovr Sea-K-vel. 

One of the shovels at work in the lock 
site at Gatun is below sea-level, making a 
ciit at — 6. This is in the lowest of the three 
locks. Little trouble has been experienced 
from seepage, and the 12-inch pump recently 
installed is able to keep the water below the 
point where it would interfere with the 
shovel. Two additional 12-inch pvimps are 
at hand in case they are needed, as they 
probably will be later. The excavation in 
the lower locks will go down to — 55.67. 
The excavation from the lock site is being 
used in the fill of the high trestle on the re- 
located line of the Panama railroad at Gatun. 



Chame Sand Deposits. 

Borings along the beach at Cham6 are 
about half finished. Holes have been sunk 
along the inner side of the peninsula 1,000 
feet apart and 50 feet below mean tide. At 
this depth the sand is apparently of the 
same grade as at the surface, and the amount 
that can be obtained at this place is, there- 
fore, greater than was estimated. Borings 
are now being made along the outside shore 
of the peninsula. 



New Shovel Records. 

The largest daily record for steam shovel 
excavation in the Central Division was made 
on September 30, when 52 shovels took out 
63,418 cubic yards of material. The best 
previous record was made on July 9, when 



55 shovels excavated 63,049 cubic yards. 
On September 28. shovel 209, working- at 
Pedro Miguel, took out 3,100 cubic yards, 
which is the best record for a single shovel 
in 1908. The best record for a single shovel 
was made in 1907 by shovel 226, which took 
out 3,750 cubic yards on November 18. 

September Excavation. 

The grand total of excavation during the 
month of September was 3,158,886 cubic 
yards. All of this except 69,035 cubic yards 
was taken from the Canal prism. This is 
93,620 cubic yards less than the record for 
.August, and 321,384 cubic yards less than 
the highest record, that of March, 1908. 
There were 25 working days in September, 
one less than in .\ugust, and one less than 
in March. Of the grand total of September 
excavation 1,374,856 cubic yards were taken 
out by dredges and the remainder was dry 
excavation. The average rainfall for Sep- 
tember for the territory in which excavation 
is in progress was 9.72 inches, as compared 
with 11.91 inches in .August. 

The excavation for September, 1908, as 
compared with that for the same month in 
1907, is over twice as large, while the rain- 
fall in September, 1907, was 11.55. In making 
such a comparison, however, it should be 
borne in mind that the work has developed 
.greath- all along the line within a year, and 
that in September, 1907, the excavation at 
the lock sites at Miraflores and Pedro Mi- 
guel had not been begun, while the sea- 
going suction dredge now at work on the 
Pacific end had not arrived on the Isthmus. 
In the Atlantic Division the excavation 
was 802.878 cubic yards, of which 104,780 
cubic yards were from the site of the locks. 
32,112 cubic yards from the prism at Mindi, 
and 41,210 cubic yards from the spillway of 
Gatun Dam. The dredges working in the 
prism in Limon Bay took out 624,776 cubic 
yards. 

In the Central Division the excavation was 
1,459.808 cubic yards, of which all but 
27,241 cubic ^-ards was in the Canal prism. 
This excavation was entirely by steam 
shovels. As compared with .August the ex- 
cavation in the Central Division fell off 
70,802 cubic yards, and as compared with 
July it was 2,726 3ards larger. In the Cu- 
lebra section, or Culebra Cut, the total exca- 
vation was 1,122,860 cubic yards, of which 
27,241 cubic yards were from the Obispo Di- 
version, which is not in the Canal prism. 
On this section of the work the rainfall in 
September was slightly heavier than in .Au- 
gust, and the record was also influenced by 
the temporary burying of three shovels at 
Cucaracha slide, and by the fact that the 
month was one working day shorter than the 
month of August. On the other hand, in 
spite of the heavier rainfall the dumps at 
both ends of the Cut were in unusually good 
condition, the experience of past rainy sea- 



sons having been used to advantage in keep- 
ing up the tracks and handling the spoil. 

In the Pacific Division all previous records 
were broken by an excavation of 885,200 
cubic yards, all but 584 cubic j'ards of which 
was taken from the Canal prism. The 
dredges, took out 750,080 cubic yards. The 
dry excavation amounted to 136,120 cubic 
yards. 

.A detailed statement of the excavation in 
the three divisions follows: 

ATLANTIC DIVISION. 



Locality. 



From Outside Total 
Canal Canal , excava- 
Prisra I Prism ' tion 



Dry excavation-' 
Gitun spillway... 

G.Ttuii Locks 

Mindi 



CH. yds. 



104.780 
32.112 



cu. yds. cu. yds. 
41,210 



41.210 
104,780 
32.112 



Total . 



136.892 I 41.210 



ll'et excavation- 
Colon dredging. . . 



Total wet and dry 
excavation 



41.210 



624,776 



802.878 



CENTRAL DIVISION. 



All dry excavation — 

Chagres section 346.948 

Culebra section l 1,095,619 



27,241 



346.948 
1.122.860 



Total I 1.442.567 



27,241 1 1.469,808 



PACIFIC DIVISION. 



Dry excovation— 

Miraflores I,ocks 

Pedro Miguel l,ocks.... 


88.605 
28.750 
18.181 


501 
83 


89.106 
28.833 
18,181 








ToUll 

It^et excavation — 


135,536 
750.080 


584 


136.120 
750.080 








Total wet and dry 
exc.nvatiou 


885.616 


584 


886.200 



TOTAL EXCAV.^TION, ENTIRE CANAL. 



Dry excavation 

Wet excavation 



1 1,714,995 69,035 i 1,784.030 
1.374.856 • 1,374,856 



Total 3,089.851 



69,035 I 3,158,886 



Mean rainfall along Canal (eleven stations), 9.72 
inches. 

Figures of monthl)- excavation are based 
upon telephone reports from the Division 
Engineers, and are subject to slight alter- 
ations when the official reports are received. 



Po-st-office at Miraflores. 

.A post-office was opened at Miraflores on 
October 1. It is a money order office and 
is located in a remodeled l^uilding near the 
railroad station. This addition brings the 
nu;;il)er of post-offices in the Canal Zone up 
to eighteen. 

La Boca Shlpways. 

The old French ladder dredge Mole, for- 
merly dredge A-2, was taken from the ways 
at Iva Boca, September 30, and within a week 
will resume work in the harbor. This is the 
dredge that worked five years without un- 
dergoing general repairs, and now that 



42 



THE CANAL RECORD 



NOTES OF PROGRESS, 



(.Continued) 



extensive repairs have been made it is be- 
lieved to be in as good condition as ever. 

Tlie steam trawler Riversdale has been 
rechristened the Chame. She is undergoing 
repairs and being fitted with an oil tank and 
oil burning apparatus at the La Boca ship- 
yards. A refrigerator plant will probably be 
installed before the ship is set at work as a 
tensler in the Chamd sand service. 

September Rainfall for Two Years. 

I, • Total Total Station 

Stations— 5 1 Sept., Sept.. average 

aajs. jgyj ,q|^, for month. 

Atlandc Slope— 

Cri.stobal 26 11.72 11.57 12.48 

Brazos Brook 26 13.02 12.05 13.23 

Gatnn 26 8.03 8.52 10.4S 

Bohio 27 13.63 8.74 14.07 

Tabemilla 23 12.51 12.85 12.68 

San Pablo 24 13 39 9.42 11.40 

Central Section— 

Bas Obispo 25 14.71 6.70 11.78 

Gainboa 26 14.01 6.28 10.65 

Empire 26 10.86 9.76 7.87 

Camacho 26 13.47 12.33 10.64 

Culebra 28 11.38 13.74 11.58 

Rio Grande 27 U.99 15.32 11.58 

Pacific Slofn — 

Pedro Migiiel 24 7.56 

LaBoca 21 9.99 3.93 6.71 

Ancon 20 11.15 5.93 8.02 

UPt>€r Ckasres — 

Alh.njuela 24 11.88 13.44 11.80 

Atlantic Coast — 

PortoBello 22 8.59 

Clerical Work of Mechanical Division. 

The keeping of "time," the records of 
lahor distribution, and the work on distribu- 
tion of charges for material in the Mechani- 
cal Division will be done hereafter at the 
shops instead of in the office at Culebra. 
Each master mechanic will make up the pay- 
roll for his shop. This involves the trans- 
fer of clerks heretofore employed at Cule- 
bra to the shops. The change is made in 
order that the clerical work involved in 
keepin,g these records ma}- be consolidated 
in the shops, thereby giving the master me- 
chanic a better grasp of the work entrusted 
to him. 



September "with tiie Dredges. 

The dredges at work in the .\tlantic and 
Pacific Divisions excavated 1,437,885 cubic 
yards of earth and rock in September. This 
total does not agree with that given in the 
table of September excavation, 1,374,856, 
because the latter amount includes onl^- ex- 
cavation from the Canal prism, and does not 
take into consideration the 63,029 cubic 
j'ards excavated by suction dredge No. 82, 
and the 16-inch suction dredge in the Atlan- 
tic Division. 

During the month dredge No. 83, which 
was undergoing repairs at the Cristobal Axy- 
dock, was set at work and excavated 33,841 
cubic yards. The dipper dredge Chagres 
made the remarkably high record of 25,179 
cubic yards, working in rock in the prism 
on the shore of Limon Bay. 

In the Pacific Division the dredging fleet 
was strengthened by the addition of the 20- 
incli suction dredge Sandpiper, and the dip- 
per dredge. The Sandpiper was undergoing 
her first month's test, and the amount ex- 
cavated is no indication of her capacity. All 
of the dredges in the Pacific Division, ex- 
cept the Culebra, are working inside the 
harbor. The sea-going ladder dredge Go- 
pher struck a ledge of rock at elevation 
— 26 during the last week of September. 



The dipper dredge was set at work on Sep- 
tember 16. All the other dredges worked 
the full month. 

\ statement of the amount and nature of 
material excavated by each dredge follows: 
ATLANTIC Division. 



Name and class of 
Dredge. 


Excava- 
tion. 
Cu. yds. 


Material. 


.\ncon (sea-going: suc- 
tion). 
No. 1 (French ladder).... 
No. 6 (French ladder).... 

Mindi (dipper) 

Chagres (dipper) 


350,310 

152,727 
43,942 
18,777 
25,179 
14,055 
48,974 
33,841 


Earth. 

Earth. 

Earth and rock. 

Rock. 

Rock. 

Coral. 


No. 82 (20-inch suction). 
No. 83 (20-inch suction). 


Earth and rock. 
Earth. 


Total 


687,805 





Pacific Division. 



Culebra (sea-going sue- 432,312 

tion). 

Gopher (sea-going lad- 138,757 

der. French). 

No. 14 (ladder, French) .' 129,608 

Dipper 1 21,.309 

Sandpiper (20-inch sue- [ 28,094 

tion). 

Total I 750,080 

Grand total 1 ,437,885 



Earth. 

Earth. 

Earth. 
Earth. 
Earth. 



Canal Zone Scliools. 

A meeting of the teachers of the Canal 
Zone schools was held in the office of the 
Superintendent of Schools at Ancon on Tues- 
day, September 29. The white teachers met 
in the morning and the colored teachers in 
the afternoon. Matters in connection with 
the opening of the schools on October 1 
were discussed and assignment of teachers 
made. The teachers in the white schools 
are as follows: 

Ancon — Miss Catharine Bailey, principal, Miss 
HelenX. Danforth, and Mrs. Winifred C. Ewing. 

Pedro Miguel — Mrs. W. E. Maxon. 

Paraiso — Miss Margaret E. Kyte. 

Culebra — Mrs. Mamie Miracle, principal, Mrs. C. H. 
Ellsworth, Miss Gertrude L. Bliss, and Miss Jessie S. 
Wilson. 

Empire — Miss Jessie J. Heller, principal, Miss Ida 
Keys, and Mrs. Eugene G. Argraves. 

Las Cascadas — Mrs. Fay Calvert Berry, 

Gorgoua — Mrs. Edith C. Bristol, principal. Miss 
Florence O'Connor, and Miss D. Vera Sabsovich. 

Gatnn — Miss Ida Altstaetter, principal, and Mrs. 
A. B. Shippee. 

Cristobal — Mrs. Edward J. Corcoran, principal. 
Mi.ss Odina J. h. Frost, Miss Grace Yarboroitgh. and 
Miss Edith Slifer. 

Colon Beach — Miss Margaret B. .Slifer. principal, 
and Miss Cherry Robb. 

Owing to the small number of children 
attending school at L,a Boca last year that 
school has been aljolished and the children 
at La Boca will be transported to and from 
the school at Ancon in a wagonette. 

On the opening day of school there were 
43 teachers employed, 24 white and 19 col- 
ored. The number of children enrolled on 
the first day was 396 white and 264 colored. 
There is no available record of the first 
day's attendance for last year, but accord- 



ing to a report made out shortly after the 
first week of school, there were enrolled 299 
white children and 638 colored children. 
The white schools are opening this year, 
therefore, with an enrollment on the first 
day of 97 more than there had been enrolled 
by the end of the first week last year. The 
children of the colored schools are coming 
in slowly. From inquiries made on the sec- 
ond day the indication is that they will en- 
ter rapidlv during the coming week. 

High school work is being carried on at 
Cristobal and Culebra. .\t the latter place 
there are several high school pupils, and 
both first and second \ear work is being done. 

Depth of Water at Locks. 

The Canal Record: 

I would like to ask whether the dilTerence 
between the specific gravity of salt water 
and that of fresh water will interfere with 
the passage through Sosa Lake of vessels 
which are loaded for salt water voyages? 
J. M. Gallion. 

Chica.go, 111., September 12, 1908. 

[There will be no Sosa Lake, since under 
the change of plan, adopted in December, 
1907, two of the locks at the Pacific end of 
the Canal will be placed at Miraflores instead 
of at La Boca. The channel from the Pa- 
cific to Miraflores Locks will be 45 feet deep 
below mean tide, and the channel at the 
Atlantic entrance to Gatun Locks will be 41 
feet deep, below mean tide. This difference 
in the depth of water between the Atlantic 
and Pacific entrances is due to the difference 
in tidal oscillations in the two oceans. 

The controlling element, so far as naviga- 
tion is concerned, will not be the depth of 
water in Gatun Lake, or other body of water, 
but the depth over mitre sills of the locks. 
The depth over mitre sills of the locks was 
fixed by resolution of the Isthmian Canal 
Commission on November 20, 1905, after- 
ward approved b}- the President, and is to 
be not less than 40 feet in salt and 4I1/3 feet 
in fresh water. Consequently the difference 
in draft of vessels, due to the difference in 
specific gra\-ity of fresh and salt water, will 
be provided for]. 



New Observation To-wer. 

A new observation tower for the Division 
of Meteorology and River Hydraulics is being 
built iir the rear of the new building of the 
Division at .\ncon. The elevation of the 
ground at the Ijase of the tower is 97 feet, 
and the platform is to be 50 feet above the 
ground, which will give an elevation of 147 
feet above mean sea-level. The instru- 
ments, which will include an anemometer 
and a sunshine and cloud recorder, will be 
IS feet above the platform, which will put 
them well above the roofs of the surround- 
ing l5uildings. The advisabilit5- of having 
a time ball also is being considered. 



WEATHER CONDITIONS, CANAL ZONE, SEPTEMBER, 1908. 




THE CANAL RECORD 



43 



FROM TABERNILLA TO GAMBOA. 

Old Chagres Division Work Neariug Com- 
pletion. 

At the time of the organisation of the 
Chagres Division, August 1, 1907, it was es- 
timated that about twelve million cubic 
yards of material were to be excavated, of 
which 7,000,000 were to be by steam shovel 
and the remaining 5,000,000 cubic yards 
by suction dredge. This division e.Ktended 
from Gatun to the beginning of Culebra Cut 
at Bas Obispo. 

A study of the maps available at that time 
showed that these quantities could be mate- 
rially reduced. By December of 1907, the 
engineers were able to present a new plan 
of Canal location in which nearly the entire 
line from Gatun to Bas Obispo was changed, 
and by which, without increasing the curva- 
ture, a saving of 1,750,000 cubic yards 
would be made. 

In the reorganization of July 1, 1908, the 
Tabernillaaud Gorgona Districts of the Cen- 
tral Division were created to comprise that 
part of the old Chagres Division which ex- 
tends from Tabernilla to the beginning of 
Culebra Cut. No work had been done on 
that part of the old Chagres Division ex- 
tending from Tabernilla to Gatun, now in- 
cluded in the Atlantic Division. 

The amount to be excavated in the Taber- 
nilla and Gorgona Districts, including the 
work from Tabernilla to Gamboa, was esti- 
mated at 3,459, 132 cubic yards and 2,965,309 
cubic yards, respectively, to be taken out by 
steam shovels, and a total of 4,500,000 cubic 
yards by suction dredges in both districts. 
A careful estimate just completed gives the 
amount of material to be removed after Sep- 
tember 1, 1908, as 8,033,684 cubic yards, of 
which 6,325, 700 cubic yards are earth, 1.709,- 
984 are rock, and 22,000 cubic yards have 
been added to allojv for possible slides. The 
French excavated 2,538,265 cubic yards in 
this territory. 

Work in the Tabernilla District was be- 
gun in September, 1907, and up to Septem- 
ber 1, of this year, 1,585,816 cubic yards 
had been removed, the work therefore being 
45 per cent completed. The present plant 
consists of five 70-ton Bucyrus shovels and 
two Model-91 Marion shovels. Both Bel- 
gian and American locomotives, and French 
and Oliver dump cars are used in hauling 
away the spoil. The shovels that are seen 
at work in front of the village of San Pablo 
are working at grade. At San Pablo the Ca- 
nal is to be 800 feet in width, and it will em- 
brace that part of the present roadbed of 
the Panama railroad lying between the post- 
office and a point about 750 feet south of 
the Panama railroad bridge spanning the 
old French canal. Before this section may 
be completed it will be necessary to throw 
the railroad line in toward the river so that 
it may lie clear of the prism, or to wait 
until the relocated line of the railroad from 
Barbacoas to Gamboa can be used. 

The prosecution of the Caimito work de- 
veloped a peculiar state of affairs. The 
present location of the Canal lies just south 
and clear of the old French canal at this 
point. It is estimated that the French ex- 
cavated in one deep cut at this location 
1,000,000 cubic j-ards of rock. In the work 
that has been going on the past year it has 
been found necessary to move several hun- 
dred thousand yards of this French exca- 



vation, which had been dumped where the 
Canal prism is now located, and to dump it 
back into the old French canal cut, which 
incidentally made a very convenient dump- 
ing ground. 

Between Caimito and Matachin the line of 
the Canal follows closely the Chagres River. 
In this territory some 4,500,000 cubic yards 
of material, practically all earth, are to be 
taken out. It is proposed to excavate this 
material by suction dredge, the work to be 
begun when the water in Gatun Lake 
reachesan elevation of approximately 55 feet. 
It is possible that the old French dredge now 
at Mamei may be overhauled, made into a 
hydraulic dredge, and used for a part of this 
work. Part of this section lies in the Taber- 
nilla and part in the Gorgona districts. 

The Gorgona District comprises also what 
is known as the Santa Cruz and Matachin 
work, the excivation to be mide originally 
being 1,247,652 cubic yards and 1,717,657 
cubic yards respectively. This work is at 
present about 35 per cent completed and 
should be finished before August, 1909. 

The work iu the Gorgona District is vi- 
tally concerned with the waters of the Chag- 
res River, the grade of the Canal being 
lower than the river at its low water stage. 
Earth dams were constructed and two 
pumping plants were installed each consist- 
ing of two 10-inch centrifugal pumps, one 
plant being driven by compressed air and 
the other using steam. These pumps are 
operated after a heavy rain or during a rise 
of the river, and no trouble is experienced 
in keeping the low level drained. With the 
completion of the shovel excavation the river 
will be turned through the completed Canal, 
thus allowing the railroad to straighten its 
relocated line, and eliminate the tortuous 
curves lying in the first mile north of the 
Gamboa bridge. 



The Manual of Examinations, containing all 
necessary information and .\pplication Form, 
may be obtained from the Secretary of the 
Isthmian Civil Service Board, office of the 
Chairman, Culebra. Canal Zone. 



Official Addresses In the States. 

The Washington office of the Isthmian 
Canal Commission requests that whenever 
officials of the Commission are iu the States 
they notify that office of their address. At 
times the Washington office has occasion to 
communicate with such officials, and fre- 
quently mail is sent in care of that office, 
which can not be forwarded because of the 
lack of definite information as to addresses. 



Culebra Brake Service Discontinued 

The Chief Quartermaster announces that 
the brake service at Culebra will be discon- 
tinued, effective Saturday, October 10, until 
further notice, owing to the necessity for 
making general repairs to the brake. 



Stages of the Chagres. 

Maximum height of Chagres above low 
water for the week ending midnight, Oc- 
tober 3, 1908 : 



Central Division Magazines. 

A service magazine, with a capacity of a 
carload of dynamite, has been built on the 
east side of the Canal at Cucaracha. It is 
constructed of concrete blocks. The old 
storage magazine at Bas Obispo has been 
taken down and rebuilt at the end of Mamei 
dump, and is now in use. It has a capacity 
of 500,000 pounds, aud is under the manage- 
ment of the Quartermaster's Department. 





Stations. 






s 


1 


d 








a 


* 


3 
















> 


5 





pa 


6 


Height of low w.lter 












above mean sea 












level, feet 


129 


92 


46 








Maximum height ab. 












low water, feet: 












Sunday, Sept. 27. ... 


7.55 


6.25 


9.53 


11.50 


5.15 


Monday, Sept. 2S.... 


4.10 


4.80 


9.60 


13.75 


5.84 


Tuesday. Sept. 29... 


5.10 


4.50 


6.25 


10.55 


5.00 


Wedn'sday.Sept. 30 


1,80 


2.28 


3.60 


8.55 


4.00 


Thursday, Oct. 1.... 


1.45 


2.03 


3.90 


7.75 


2.60 


Friday, Oct. 2 


3.60 


3.57 


4,15 


8.42 


2.90 


Saturday, Oct. 3 


2.40 


3.42 


5.00 


9.45 


3.70 


Maximum for week.. 


7.55 


6.25 


9.60 1 13.75 1 5.84 



Bids for the construction by contract of 
two type 17 houses, to be erected at Corozal, 
will be opened at the Mount Hope Depot on 
October 13. Plans may be procured at the 
Mount Hope Depot, or seen at the Office of 
the Chairman at Culebra. 



OFTICIAL CIRCULARS. 

Addition to Quartermaster Worlc. 

Culebra. September 29. 1908. 
Circular No. 183F-1. 

Effective Jctoberl. 1908: The work performed by 
the Quartermaster's Department uudei- the provi- 
sions of Circular No. 1S3F. is extended to include the 
territories of Mount Hope and Cristobal. 

H. F. Hodges, 
Acting Chairman and Chief Engineer. 

Storehouse at G*tuti. 

Culebra, September 30, 1908. 
ClRCUL-^R No. 213. 

On October 1, 1908, the storehouse and lumber yard 
at Gatun. now operated by the Quartermasters De- 
partment, will be transferred to the Division Engi- 
neer of the Atlantic Division, with all material and 
supplies on hand, and necessary forces. 

H. F. Hodges, 
Acting Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Malingerers to Be Dismissed. 

CULEBRA, October 2, 1908, 
Circular No. 214. 

A number of cases of malingering have recently 
been reported. If any employe is too ill to work he 
is expected either to go to the hospital or to remain 
in quarters, ex-ept for such time as may be necessary 
to consult a physician or to go to a dispensary. In 
future, any employe found loafing or loitering on any 
day for which he presents a sick certificate will be 
dismissed from the servnce. 

H. F Hodges, 
Acting Chairman . 



Acting Chief Clerk. 

ANCON, September 29. 1908. 
Heads of Dep.\rtments; 

Effective this date : Mr. John S, Walker will act as 
Chief Clerk during the absence on leave of Mr, Har- 
ry E, Bovay. 

By direction of the Chief Sanitary Officer. 

C, C. MCCOLLOCH, JR,. 
Acting Executive Officer. 



Examination for Physician. 

A local examination for the position of 
phjsician in the service of the Isthmian Ca- 
nal Commission, entrance salary $1,800 per 
annum, %vill be held October 14, 1908, at 9 
a. m. in the office of the Chairman, Culebra. 



NOTICE. 

Panama Railroad Company and 
Panama Railroad Steamship Line, 
Colon, R, P., October 2. 1908, 
Gambling and other violations of the Panamanian 
laws on Panama Railroad leased property are pro- 
hibited. 

Hiram J, Slifer, 
Genei al Manager. 



44 



THE CANAL RECORD 



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THE CANAL RECuKD 



45 



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE. 

Wotnea*s Clubs and Other Features. 

The Gatun Woman's Club held its open- 
ing meeting on Friday, September 25, the 
president, Mrs. C. D. Corp, in the chair. 
The meeting was informal and was devoted 
to discussions of club work and the best 
means of accomplishing the aims of the 
organization. Owing to the number of 
club members removed from Gatun and the 
absence of others on vacation, it was decided 
to defer the annual meeting with election of 
officers until the first Friday in November. 
In the meantime, the organization w-iU meet 
regularly. 

The Gorgona Woman's Club held its reg- 
ular meeting on Thursdaj-, October 1, with 
the president in the chair. After a few in- 
formal remarks on items of interest from the 
recent Federation meeting, committees were 
appointed for the ensuing half year, as fol- 
lows: Philanthropic, Mrs. F. Morrison, Mrs. 
J. Cockett, Mrs. Toberer; home, Mrs. Phil- 
lips, Mrs. Bergstrom, Mrs. Varen Kamp; 
music, Mrs. Swain, Mrs. Beatham, Mrs. 
Hudson; art, Mrs. Bromley, Mrs. Hinkle, 
Mrs. Sweet; literary, Mrs. Everist, Mrs. 
Texter, Mrs. Strock. Mrs. Ament, who sailed 
for the States on October 6, after a visit of 
two months with her sister, Mrs. Morrison, 
was given a rising vote of thanks for her 
assistance in club matters, and on Friday 
evening the club presented her with a cen- 
terpiece as a token of appreciation. 

The monthly business meeting of the I^as 
Cascadas Woman's Club was held at the 
residence of Mrs. J. P. Do\le, October 1. 
The committees appointed were: Social, 
Mrs .\lbrecht, chairman, Mrs. Green, Mrs. 
Thompson, and Mrs. Grimmison; visiting, 
Mrs. Doyle and Mrs. Hutton. The next 
meeting will be held October 8, at the resi- 
dence of Mrs. Albrecht. The first anniver- 
sary of the organization of the L,as Casca- 
das club will occur on October 17. The 
purposes of the club have been the pro- 
motion of social life, and municipal im- 
provements, and the organization has been 
a factor in the community life that has 
been greatly appreciated. Several pub- 
lic improvements made in the town are due 
to the efforts and influence of the club. 
The division of the commissary for whites 
and negroes, better accommodations at the 
post-ofSce, and improvement in the bridges 
and sidewalks being among them. The 
weekly social meetings tend to make life in 
the town pleasauter and to draw the women 
together. A sewing class has been started 
for young girls which meets regularly. 

The Empire Woman's Club gave a recep- 
tion to its president, Mrs. F. W. Miracle, 
on Tuesday, September 30, a large number 
of club members and guests attending. Re- 
freshments were served by a committee at 
tables decorated with flowers and plants. 
Mrs. H. C. Ball presided at a short business 
meeting before the reception. Reports from 
the various Federation committees were 
read and a discussion on the subject of the 
reading course which the club expects to take 
up was held. A paper on the etiquette of 
Japanese tea was read by Mrs. J. H Helmer, 
and violin and piano selections were given 
by the Misses Sophia and May Johnson. 
The president gave an account of her expe- 
rience during the hurricane on the recent trip 
of the Colon . 

The Culebra Woman's Club had a well at- 



tended meeting on Thursday, October 1. Re- 
ports from the Federation meeting were 
rendered. Master Arthur Howard gave pi- 
ano selections. There were several guests 
for the afternoon including Mrs. Frank Mir- 
acle of Empire. 

.•\lfaretta Council No. 1. Degree of Poca- 
hantas, of the Improved Order of Red Men, 
will give a grand box social, followed by a 
dance and entertainment, Tuesday evening, 
October 13, at the Fraternal Hall, Culebra. 
All friends are cordially invited to be 
present. 

The Paraiso Social Club gave a dance last 
week which was attended by a number of 
visitor? from Pedro Miguel and Culebra. 

The Pedro Miguel Woman's Club gave an 
entertainment on Thursday evening, Octo- 
ber 1, for the purpose of assisting the Social 
and Recreative Club in the purchase of a 
piano. There was a good attendance and a 
pleasant evening was spent in games, dan- 
cing and other amusements. Home-made 
refreshments were sold. Mrs. H. C. Shick, 
secretary of the club from its organization, 
left Monday, October 5, to spend the winter 
in California. She e.xpects to return to the 
Isthmus in the spring. 

Mrs. Lorin C. Collins, president of the 
Canal Zone Federation of Women's Clulis 
and of the Cristobal Woman's Club, sailed 
on the Allianca, October 3, for a three 
months' visit to the United States. During 
her absence Mrs. E. Lewis Baker, vice-presi- 
dent, will preside at the meetings of the Cris- 
tobal club. 



Notice to Odd Fellows. 

B. F. Sisson, District Deputy Grand Sire, 
I. O. O. F., will institute Isthmian Canal 
Rebekah lyodge No. 1 in the lodge hall at 
Gorgona, on Saturday evening, October 10, 
1908. All members of the Rebekah degree 
on the Isthmus are requested to be present 
and any one who is eligible and wishes to 
become a member is invited to send in an 
application. 

Tivoli Club Notice. 

The regular Tivoli Club dance will be 
given on Saturday evening, October 10, at 
Hotel Tivoli. Notice has been sent to each 
member. 

As it is now generally known that the 
club dances are held on the second and fourth 
Saturday of eacli month, the secretary an- 
nounces that no individual notices will be 
sent out in future except in case of special 
dances. A general notice will be printed in 
The Canai, Record, and the daily news- 
papers. 



Ancon Library Association. 

A meeting was held at Hotel Tivoli on the 
night of August 28, to form a library asso- 
ciation in Ancon, notice of which had been 
given through The Canal Record. 

It was the sense of the meeting that the 
interest in the library indicated by the at- 
tendance was not sufficient to justify a pre- 
liminary organization, and it was decided to 
canvass Ancon, La Boca and Corozal, and 
ascertain how many would be willing to be- 
come members of such an association and 
pay for the support of a reading room the sum 
of two dollars per year, payable semi-an- 
nually. 

It is intended to have a circulating library 
of at least one thousand volumes, and all 



current newspapers and periodicals on file 
in the reading room. 

The association if formed hf s been prom- 
ised by the Chairman of the Isthmian Canal 
Commission the use of the ro^ms formerly 
occupied by the Chief Sanitary Inspector, 
over the present offices of the District Quar- 
te#naster. 

If a sufficient number of persons agree to 
become members, another meeting will be 
called, adequate notice of which will be 
given through The Canai, Record, and 
an organization will be effected. 

.\ny names sent to The Canal Record 
will be placed upon the list. 



PERSONAL. 



W. G. Comber, resident ergineer at La 
Boca, left on the Heridia, C'ctober 6, for 
Costa Rica, where he will spend his annual 
leave. 

Capt. T. C. Lyster, Medical Corps, U. S.A., 
of Ancon Hospital, sailed for the States on 
the Advance, September 28, having been 
ordered to Washington for examination for 
promotion . 

Obituarv. 

Paul Vanderstop, of Chicago, 111., died 
at Ancon Hospital on September 20, of ma- 
laria. He came to the Isthmu; in February, 
1907, and had been living recently at East 
La Boca. His brother, Peter Vanderstop, 
lives at 291 Revnolds street, Rc^chester, N. Y. 



Civic Pride Hindrances, 

The C,\nal Record : 

The letter signed Civic Pride, which ap- 
peared in your issue of September 30, 
attracted my attention because of the apparent 
reflection it contained on tht- work of the 
Canal Zone police. The writer does the 
police department at Cristoba'. an injustice 
whenhe insinuates that little effort is made to 
keep stray animals off the streets and lawns 
of this village. It is not po!^sible to keep 
the animals that strav- from Ceylon into Cris- 
tobal entirely out of the American settle- 
ment, but an effort is made, and I believe 
it is attended with remarkable success, to 
impound such animals as soon as they are 
detected. In September, for instance, the 
police department at Cristob.il impounded 
7 horses, 2 mules, 4 goats, and 1 cow. I do 
not like to have Cristobal, or any part of it 
referred to as a "cabbage patch," because it 
is m^- home, and because civic pride can not 
be stimulated by the use of slurring epi- 
thets. Please publish this in justice to the 
police of Cristobal. 

Respectfulh', 

A Resident. 

Cristobal, October 3, 1908. 

Misdirected Letters. 

Division of Deid Letters. 
Ancon. C. Z.. Ociober 6. 1908. 
The following insufficiently -addressed letters, orixti- 
nating in the United States and its t os.sessions. have 
been received in the office of the Lirector of Posts, 
and may be obtained on reqnest of addressee: 
Bowcn. A. S. Karsner. ; . Walter 

Brown, Geo. (Engineer) Koch. Cart- F. 



Dailey, John 
Delacroix, Clem 
Dickinson- Wni. K- 
Edu'ards, Howard 
Kiirtune- H- D- 
Graham, Mrs- W- H- 
Holt, X. D- 
Howell Corljoral 
Irwin. Mrs. Don E. 
Jones. Parker A. 



Leach, .-^rthnr 
Locken- K- O. 
MacDeviti- John 
Maynard, Miss B- I- 
Neely. P. John 
O'Brien- Mrs- N- O- 
Schultz. V.'alter 
Swinehart , Robt- 
Taylor, Mrs. Jennie 



Piles are being driven for the handling 
docks and cement storehouse at Gatun Locks. 



46 



THE CANAL RECORD 



A MOSQUI ro HUNT. 

How the Malaria Rate at Corozal Was 
Reduced. 

Durini; the latter part of June, tl-.e tiiala- 
ria rate at Coro/^al suddenl\- took a jump 
upward. No further indication was needed 
to assure the Department of Sanitation tliat 
the anopheles mosquito had found a new 
breeding place in that vicinity, undiscovered 
b)- the district inspector. 

Unable to account for the rise, at his re- 
quest a special inspector was .sent to his as- 
sistance. The Chief Sanitary Inspector, not 
being satisfied with the report, sent out a 
second inspector, and finally a third. The 
recommendations of all were carried out, 
and the rate fell steadily, but not to the nor- 
mal, and the returns for each week were re- 
.i-arded with dissatisfaction. 

About the middle of August, the rate sud- 
denly shot up higher than ever. Two in- 
spectors were sent to the district inspector 
with orders that the three cover every foot 
of the ground. This w-as accomplished in 
two days by hard work and late hours. Two 
reported that the breeding place of the mos- 
quitoes was 700 yards from the nearest camp, 
and the third inspector stated that the in- 
fection was from the aggregate of small 
breeding places in which the larva; had since 
been destroyed by oilings. One of the char- 
acteristics of the anopheles mosquito is that 
it is not likely to fly at one time a distance 
of more than 200 yards from its breeding- 
place, and that it is seldom found more than 
this distance from its home. 

Comparatively little of the life-halnt of the 
anopheles is accurately known, but the legit- 
imate inference deducted from the known 
facts are sufficient to establish a working 
basis, viz: 

(1) That the female anopheles has the 
hoverin.g instinct for raising her family, anal- 
agous to the fish. 

(2) That after her eg.gs are fertilized she 
is impelled to seek the blood of animals or 
human beings in order to develop her e.g.gs 
to perfection. 

(3) That after obtaining the necessary 
blood she seeks her own birth place to de- 
posit her eggs. 

Herein lies the weakness of the anopheles 
female of which man takes advanta.ge. Her 
home ties hold her from any such migra- 
tions as the culex often makes, and being 
fatally susceptible to the sunlight a clearing 
of all grass and brush for 200 yards from her 
home is sufficient to accomplish her destruc- 
tion. 

Hence the breeding place 700 yards dis- 
tant could not be accepted, although it was 
destroyed as a precautionary measure. A 
third inspector was sent to Corozal, with or- 
ders not to consult with the others, but to 
remain there until he could positively lo- 
cate the point of infection. He began b}- 
searchin.g each building for adult anopheles. 
From the building in which he captured the 
greatest number he started early in the 
morning when the grass was wet and the 
mosquitoes were lying low. He followed a 
zigzag course, turning from point to point 
as he found the number lessening. This 
led him to a salt marsh 280 \'ards from 
the buildings. But anopheles do not breed 
in salt water, and moreover the edges of 
the swamp were well oiled where fresh wa- 
ter would collect and no larvte were found. 

He kept on, and penetrating the jungle 



300 yards, came upon a few larv:e and pupa. 
The district inspector appeared on the oppo- 
site bank with a machete in hand, .saying 
that he believed the breeding place was in 
the middle of the swamp, and that he had 
determined to go in. Go in he did, to his 
waist, in water and mire, laboriou.sly cutting 
his way throu.gh the branches to the middle 
of the swamp, where he found the larvte 
thick enough to blacken the comparatively 
fresh water. Half a mile awa)- a culvert 
was found so obstructed that the salt water 
did not have free access to the swamp dur- 
ing high tide, and the outflow was blocked 
at low tide. In consequence of the heavy 
rains the salt marsh had been gradually con- 
verted into a fresh water marsh, and as it 
was filled with rank vegetation, the anoph- 
eles were proviiled an ideal place for life and 
lireeding. 

Planks were thrown out into the marsh, 
lanes were cut in the vegetation and the oil- 
ers were set at work. The number of adult 
anopheles found in the camps began to 
dwindle at once, and the malaria rate soon 
fell to normal. 

This is only one instance of manj- similar 
ones, and it is cited to show the difficulties 
attendin.g mo.squito extermination and the 
maintenance of .good health in the Canal 
Zone. 

Cost of Municipal Improvements. 

Municipal improvements made by Ameri- 
cans in Panama, Colon and the Canal Zone, 
up to the close of the fiscal year 1908, cost 
55,770,750.87. distributed as follows: 

Panain.T water works and sewers SS53.849.23 

Colon water works and sewers. 601.043.91 

Zone water works and sewers 2,358,840.44 

P.aviug, Panama 489,007.77 

Paving-. Colon 293.231.26 

Zone roadways 1,174.778.26 

Total $5,770,750.87 

The work done in the cities of Panama 
and Colon was in accordance with Article 7 
of the Treaty between the United States and 
the Republic of Panama, in which the Uni- 
ted States was given the right to construct, 
maintain, and operate "all works of sanita- 
tion, collection and disposition of sewage, 
and the distribution of water in the cities of 
Panama and Colon" as "maybe necessarj- 
and convenient for the construction, main- 
tenance, operation, sanitation, and protec- 
tion" of the Panama Canal and Panama 
railroad. The municipal works in the cities 
of Colon and Panama are to be paid for, 
with interest, within the period of fifty 
years, by water and sewerage rates imposed 
and collected b}- the United States, and 
when paid for are to become the property 
of the Panamanian Government. 

In the prosecution of this work the old 
Division of Municipal Engineering, from 
the time of its organization, July 19, 1904, 
up to the end of the fiscal year, had laid 
60,469 feet of -water pipe in the city of Pan- 
ama, and 69,280 feet in the city of Colon. 
In Panama 67,925 feet of sewer -were laid 
and in Colon 37,896 feet. The paving done 
in the city of Panama amounts to 66,365 
square yards of brick, 19,116 square yards of 
concrete, 3,572 square yards of macadam, 
51,401 linear feet of concrete curb. In Colon 
62,621 .square yards of macadam pavement, 
6,410 square yards of brick, 41,267 linear 
feet of concrete curb, and 1,923 linear feet 
of basket gutter have been laid. Water for 
Colon is supplied by a Canal Zone reservoir 



located at Brazos Brook, and for Panama 
from a reservoir in the Rio Grande valley, 
near Culebra. These reservoirs also supply 
the neighboring American settlements, and 
the settlements in the interior of the Zone 
are supplied by reservoirs at Rmpire and 
Gorgona, and by pumping stations. 

In the Canal Zone nearly 98 per cent of 
all quarters constructed by the Commission, 
as well as office buildings and shops have 
been connected with the Zone sewer sj-s- 
tems. .\t the close of the fiscal year, 217,- 
975 feet of sewer had been laid and 2,162 
house connections had been made; and 292,- 
633 square yards of macadam road, 1,000 
square yard of brick pavement, and 9,266 
.square yards of paths had l)een constructed 
in the Zone. The great majority of the road- 
building done thus far has been confined to 
the .\merican settlements and has been 
made necessary by the construction of office 
buildings and quarters. 



Death of a Sailor. 

Charles Rand, boatswain mate, first-class, 
United States Navy, acting chief boatswain 
mate on the U. S. S. Buffalo, died at Ancon 
hospital on September 30, 1908, of periton- 
itis, caused by a knife wound in the abdomen 
inflicted liy a Panamanian. He was 34 years 
old and lived at Orange, N. J.; was serving 
his third enlistment in the Navy; had been a 
gun pointer on the U. S. S. Raleigh on a 
previous cruise, and had been given a good 
conduct medal for meritorious service. He 
was not of a quarrelsome disposition, and 
was considered by the officers of the Buffalo 
one of the most efficient and well behaved 
men aboard ship. His assailant has been ar- 
rested and is awaiting trial in Panama courts. 

Barbadian Found Dead. 

Charles Best, a Barbadian negro employed 
by the Panama Railroad Company, was 
found dead in some bushes between the In- 
.sane A.syluni and the railroad track at Ancon 
on the morning of September 23. His skull 
had been fractured and his throat cut. It is 
believed that he was murdered, and from 
the fact that his pockets were turned in- 
side out, that the reason for the murder 
was robbery. Charles Samuels and Ruth 
White, both colored, have been arrested and 
are being held pending investigation. 



.A new \-ard for bad-order cars has been 
authorized for the Central Division and will 
be located at Pedro Miguel. At present the 
construction trains run back from the dumps 
and are held up on the main line until the 
"bad orders" are taken out. Three new 
tracks, two extensions, and several cross- 
overs will be added to the yard in order that 
delays consequent on using the main track 
mav be avoided. 



The Assistant Chief Engineer, the Divi- 
sion Engineer of the Central Division, and 
the Assistant to the Chief Engineer, have 
been appointed a i;oinmittee to make rec- 
ommendations with regard to the construc- 
tion of a breakwater in Limon Bay for the 
harbor of Colon. 



Three I^idgerwood unloaders, working on 
the Iva Boca dumps, unloaded 652 trains, in 
all 10,432 cars of 20 yards to a car in August. 
In the same period the four unloaders work- 
ing at Tabernilla unloaded 1,199 trains of 
sixteen 20-yard cars. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



47 



COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES. 

Activities of the Young Men's Christian 
Association. 

The stamliiij? of the bowling league to October 3 
follows : 

Played II 'vn Loif H-trt-ii/. 

Empire 48 27 :i .545 

Cristobal 48 27 21 545 

Culebra 42 IS 2.s .420 

Gorgona 42 16 26 .372 

CORGONA. 

Friday eveninjj. Octocer 2. the GorKOiia Y. M. C. A, 
extended the privileges of ■' open house " to tlie peo- 
ple of Santa Cruz. A special feature of the evening 
was a kinetoscope entertainment. A special train 
convejed the people to Gorgona and back home. 

The Cnlebra bowlers visited Gorgona Saturday even- 
ing. October 3. The Gorgona team took three straight 
games. 

An exciting ping pong tounuiment was a feature 
of last Saturday evening. There were ten entries: 
eacn man played each of the other the best three out 
of five sets. 

Sunday afternoon. October 4. an Association Sing 
was held in the clubhouse. 

CRISTOBAL. 

A new corduro.v cover for the wrestling mat has 
been received, and wrestling practice will be engaged 
in every Friday night. 

The Cristobal billiard and pool team will play at 
Gorgona on Saturday. October 10. and will play re- 
turn games with the Grogoiia team at the Cristobal 
clubhouse on Saturday, October 17. 

Two mo%'ing picture entertainments were given 
during the past week. 

The orchestra from ihe ship Priz Aujiiii/ ll'i/he/in 
will give a concert at the Cristobal clubhouse on 
Monday night, October 19. 

The following schedule has been adopted for the 
the boys' department: 

Tuesdays — 3.30 to 5 p. m.. gymnasium and bowling. 

Thursdays — 3.30 to 5 p.m.. gymnasium and bowling. 

Saturdays — 9 to 11 a. m.. gymnasium and outdoor 
sports. 

The reading room is opened to boys every day until 
5 o'clock. Boys are not allowed in the building after 
5 p. m.. except to attend regular match games or 
other public entertainments. 

The games bowled at Cristobal Octotier 3. resulted 
as follows: 

CRtSTOHAL. 

First Second I'll it U Ai'C/agi- 

Robertson 199 171 164 17S 

Thomas 173 112 .... 142V2 

Strong 169 132 171 154 

Mccormick 167 170 148 161 

Gilraartin 173 16° 167 169% 

Nelson ■ . - ■ 170 170 

Total SSI 754 S20 818 

EMPIRIi. 

Brown 163 1S5 123 157 

Bardelson 147 146 114 135% 

Durand 206 151 183 ISO 

Edwards 179 191 168 179y3 

Dougherty .... 125 155 190 156^^3 

Total 820 82S 788 812 



Concert by the I. C. C. Band. 

EMPIRE. C. Z.. 

Sunday. October 11. 1908. at 2.30 p. m.: 

PROGRAM. 

1 March — U'aski?iston Grays Graf ulla 

2 Selection— 77?^ .ffrrf MiJl Herbert 

3 V^oXiz— Pans it's for Tkoiishi Blyu 

I a Tone Poem— Z,z7flcj Roberts 
b ^choXXiscYift— Lei Me Br Vour Lemon 
Coon Allen 

5 Comet Solo — A Man, a Maid, a Moon. 

a Boat Harris 

CHAS. E. JENNINGS. 

6 Medley ^&\QQi\oi\— Mill's Merry Melodies....'SV\\\^ 

7 Morceau — Dawn of Love Beudix 

S Overture — If I Were Kin^ Adam 

9 Descriptive— r/it* Racket af Gi/liscan's DeWitl 

Synopsis — The guests gather at GiUigan's : after their 

arrival Gilligan sings a song, which is followed by 
a covmtry dance. The star singer then renders a 
touching ballad, after which the bagpipes strike 
up. " Are yes all ready ?" shouts Gilligan. "Yis. 
"Then fire away." A regular "welt the floor" 
and " slip ' time follows. A sand jig conies next, 
and the festivities closed by all singing "Saint 
Patrick's Day in the Morning." 

10 GaXop—Teiemachus Bennet 

Chas. E. i'E'SHi'SG'in, Musical Director. 
A concert will be given at Paratso. C Z.. Sunday, 
October 18. 



COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT. 

NOTICE. 

Cristobal, C. Z., September 29, 19U.S. 
Effective October 1 : All coinnmuications 
intended for either the Subsistence Depart- 
ment, I. C. C, or the Commissary Depart- 
ment, P. R. R.. should be addressed to the 
Subsistence Officer, Cristobal, C. Z. 

El'GRNK T. WlUSON, 

Subsistence (\tfii.et 

COMMISSARY PRICES 

I'or week beginning October 6 : 

FRKSH MEATS. 

Price. 

Mutton— Stewing per lb h 

Shoulder and neck (not xnider 

6 pounds) per lb 7 

Entire forequarter (not under 

10 pounds) per 1I> S 

I.eg (8 to 10 pounds) per 11) 16 

Short-cut chops per lb 20 

Uamb— Stewing per lb t^ 

Kntire forequarter per lb S 

I.eg (6 to S pounds) per lb 27 

Chops per lb 2M 

Veal— Stewing per lb 10 

Entire forequarter I,15 to 20 lbs'....per lb 11 

Loin per lb 22 

Short-cut chops per lb 23 

Cutlets per lb 2.^ 

Pork— Cuts per lb 2f^ 

Beef— Suet per lb 4 

Soup per lb s 

Stew per lb 12 

rnnipd per lb.. 12. 14, \f^ 

Rib-roast, second cut (not under 3 

pounds) per lb 1^ 

Rib-roast, short cut (not under iVa 

pounds) per lb 25 

.Sirloin roast : per lb 29 

Rump roast per lb 29 

Porterhouse roast per lb 29 

Steak, round per lb 2.> 

Rib per lb 24 

Sirloin per lb 29 

Porterhouse per lb 29 

Rump peril) 29 

Tenderloin I>cr lb .^i' 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Livers— Beef per lb 12'.;: 

Calf each 65 

Sausage— Pork per lb 19 

Frankfurter per lb 17 

Lelierwurst per lb 17 

Bologna per lb 17 

Sweet lirtad- Veal each 1.2U 

Beef ■ per lb 25 

Ox tongues each 90 

Pigs' feet, pickled per lb 14 

Pigs' tongues, pickled per lb 15 

Eggs, fresh dozen M 

POULTRY AND GAME- 

Chickens— Dressed (milk-fed) each 1.30 

Large (milk-fed) each 1.50 

Capons each 2.40 

Broilers each 60 

Fowls, medium and large each. 80c. and 1.00 

Ducks, fatted (fancy) each 1.10 

Suckling pigs each 4.90 

Turkeys per lb 30 

Squabs each 45 

CURED AND PICKLED MEATS. 

Bacon— Strips per lb 23 

English, breakfast sliced per lb §26 

Ham— Sugar-cured, sliced per lb §25 

One-half, for boiling per lb §21 

Westphalia per lb 45 

Ferris per lb 20 

Beef, salt, family per lb 16 

Siilt pork per lb 13 

DAIRY PRODUCTS. 

Butter— Prints, prime quality per lb 35 

Cheese— Roquefort per lb 45 

Neufcliatel each 6 

Young America per lb 11 

Swiss per lb 33 

PMam...... each 1.05 

Camembert per lb 2S 

Mcl^iren's jar 15 

Pinxter's tin 22 

French cheese in tins— Camembert, Roque- 
fort. Brie, Nenfchatel tin 20 

Buttermilk quart 15 

Milk. Briarcliff quart 25 



VEGETABLES AND FRUITS. 

Tomatoes (local only) per lb 3 

Lettuce per lb 14 

Cauliflower per lb 10 

White potatoes per lb 3V'j 

Sweet potatoes per lb 2V2 

Cabbage per lb 4 

Onions per lb 3^ 

Cucumbers per lb S 

Parsnips per lb 3 

Lima Beans per lb 8 

Squash (summer) per lb 3 

Beets per lb 3 

Celery bunch 18 

Green com dozen 36 

Carrots per lb 3 

Turnips per lb IV2 

Onions ^Spanish) per lb 5 

Limes hundred 40 

Lemons dozen 24 

Oranges dozen 18 

Canteloupes each 

Grapes per lb s 

Peaches per lb 15 

Pears psr lb S 

§ Sold only from cold-storage and not from Coni- 
mis-saries 

UNCLAIMED PACKAGES, 



The following is a list of packages that 
have been forwarded from New York to 
Isthmian Canal Commission and Panama 
railroad employes, and that are waiting to 
be claimed at the freight house at Colon. 
The owners of these packages will have to 
make application for free customs entry in 
connection with Circular No. 85, or in the 
alternative, pay dut\' to the Panama Gov- 
ernment customs on the value of the con- 
tents of the packages, before delivery can 
be effected: 

W. S. Clements. Colon. 1 box. Aavance. Julj- 6. 

J. V. Mentero, Panai;.a, 2 cases instrument boxes 
Allianea. July 15. 

J. F. Dempsey. Colon, 1 box cloth. Allianea, July 15. 

J. R. Cocoran. Empire, 2 boxes leather. Esperama. 
August 10 : 2 crates bicycles. 1 case C material. 1 ca.se 
oil stove. 1 case S dressing. Finance. August 14. 

S. Chennalloy. Colon. 1 parcel (No. 7656). Advance. 
Jvme 10. 

C. Thomas. Cristobal. 1 parcel (No. 777S). Espe- 
ranza, August IS. 

J. B. Marsh. Gorgona, 1 seal press. Colon. August 23. 

A. \V. Ingram. Colon, 1 bundle wall paper. Finance. 
Septembers. 

H. H. Rickers, Camp Elliott, 1 box personal effects, 
Fspcranza, September 11. 

Arthur E. Rex. Ancon. 1 box musical instruments. 
Esperanza. September 11. 

C. H. Hamy. Gorgona. 1 box musical instruments. 
Esperanza, Sertember 11. 

Jas. A. Utis. Corozal. 1 box musical instruments, 
Esperanza, September 11. 

District Physician, San Pablo. 1 parcel (No. 7813), 
Esperanza, September 11. 

J. O. Gonzalez. Colon, 1 case hardware. Colon. Sep- 
tember IS. 

Tug- Service Porto BtUo and Nombre de 
Dies. 

Effective. August 6. 1908: The following is the 
schedule for tug service between Cristobal, Porto 
Bello and Nombre de Dios: 

Sunday: I,eave Cristobal 6.3C p. ni. for Porto Bello 
only; returning same day. 

Monday: Leave Cristobal after Train 2 for Porto 
Bello and Nombre de Dios: returning sjinie day. 

Tuesday; l^e.ive Cristobal after Train 3 without 
tow. for Porto Bello only; returning, leave Porto 
Bello 2.15 p. m.. without tow. 

Wednesday: I^eave Cristobal after Train 2 for 
Porto Bello and Nombre de Dios; returning same 
day, 

Friday: L,eave Cristobal after Train 2 for Porto 
Bello and Nombre de Dios: returning same day. 

Saturday: Leave Cristobal after Train 2 for Porto 
Bello only; returning, leave Porto Bello 5.30 p. m. 

The following steamers have recently arrived at La 
Boca : September 27. Tueapcl . from Valparaiso ; Sep- 
tember, 2S. Guatemala, from Valparaiso, and U. S. 
cruiser ^;</?a/('. from the north. Departures were: 
September 2b, ,^ca^«/c(7. to San Francisco: Septem- 
ber 28. California, to Valparaiso; September 30. Qui- 
to, to Buenaventura. 



48 



THE CANAL RECORD 



CANAL DIRECTORY. 

ISTHMIAN CANAL COMMISSION. 

\\' Goethals, U. S. A. 



Lieut. -Col. Geo 

Culebra. 
Lieut. -Col. H. F. Hodges, U 

bra. 
Maj. D. D. GaillariT, U. S. A. 
Maj. Wm. h. Sibert, U. S. A, 
Civil Engineer H. H. Rousseau 

Culebra. 
Mr. Jo C. S. Blackburn, Ancon. 
Col. W. C. Go.-gas, U. S. A., Ancon. 
Mr. Joseph Bucklin Bishop, 

Secretary, Ancon. 



S. A., Culc- 

Knipire. 
Gatun. 
U. S. N.. 



DEPARTMKNTS. 

Construction and Engineering. 

HL-adquarters. Culebra. 
Lieut. -Col. Geo. W. Goethals. Chairman 
and Chief r;ngineer. 

M. B. DePutron. Assistant to the Chairman. 
W. H. May. Secretary to the Chairman. 
C. A. Mcllvaine. Chief Clerk. 
Caleb M. Sa-.-ille. Assistant Engineer. 

Lieut. -Col. H. F. Hodges, Assistant Chief 
Engineer. 

C. O. Carlson, Secretary. 
Kdward Schildhaner. Electrical and Mechanical 

Engineer. 
I,. D. Cornish. H. K. Tucker. Henry Goldmark 
and David Molitor, Designing Engineers. 

Civil Engineer H. H. Rousseau, Assistant 
to the Chief Engineer. 

J. C. Parsons, Secretary. 
A. B. Nichols. Office Engineer. 
P. O. Wright. Architect. 



Ci'ntrai Division. 

Heidquartcrs, Empire. 
Maj. D. D. Gaillard, Division Engineer. 
A. E. Bronk. Chief Clerk. 
Louis K. Ro irke. Assistant Division Engineer. 
A. S. Zinn. liesident Engineer. 
Mark W. Tenny. Assistant Engineer. 
K. W. Hebi.rd. Assistant Engineer. 
W. L- 'rhonipsan, 'Assistant Engineer 
Ceo. H. Knuules, Assistant Engineer, 

Atlaniic Division. 

Headquarters, Gntuu. 
Maj. Wni. L. Sibert, Division Engineer. 
K. M. Si.nds. Chief Clerk. 
Maj. Chester Harding, U. S. A.. Assistant Di\'i- 

sion E.ngineer. 
Maj. Edgar J ad win. U. S, A.. Resident Engineer. 
Maj. J. P. Jen'ey, U. S. A., Resident Engineer. 
Capt. G. M. Hoffman. V. S. A., Assistant En- 
gineer. 
Capt. Horton W. Stickle, U. S. A.. Assistant En- 
gineer. 
U. G- Thorn, As'sistant Engineer. 
V. C. Stanton. Assistant Engineer. 
R. B, Smith. Superintendent of Dredging. 

Pacific Division. 

Headquarters. Corozal. 
S. R. Williamson, Division Engineer. 

E. A. I.e^Iay, Chief Clerk. 

W. G. Comb;rr. Resident Engineer. 
G. B. Strick^er. Resident Engineer. 
Wm. F. M. Achesou, Assistant Engineer, 
James Mach'arlane. Superintendent of Dredg- 
ing. 

Mechanlcnl Division. 

Headquarters, Culebra. 
Mr. Geo, D. Brooke. Superintendent of Mo- 
tive Power and Machinery. 

F. W. Doly. Chief Clerk' 

Earle J. Banta, Mechanical Engineer. 
A. I^. RobinHon, Electrical F.ngineer. 

Divisldnof Mfti eoroloe^y&River Hydraulics 

Headquarters, Ancon. 
Civil Engineer H. H. Rousseau, Acting Di- 
vision Engineer. 

D. W.^MacCormack. Chief Clerk. 



Quartermaster's, 

Ile.idquarters, Culebra. 
Maj. C. A. Devol, U. S. A.. Chief Quarter- 
master. 

C. H. Mann. Chief Clerk. 
I.ieut. K. F. Wood. U.S.A.. Assistant Chief 

0"-irIermf.';lfr 
Capt. Conrt],"nd Nixon. U. S. A.. Depot Qu.ir- 
terniastei , Mount Hope. 
C. I.. Parker. C. C. McColley, Inspectors. 
H. S. Fa.'ish, Acting Sun-ey Officer. 



District QuartertnastPrs. 

Ira A. Miles. Cristobal. 

R. R. Waison (acting), Gatun. 

J. M, Kiu'-r. Tabernilla. 

J. H. Humphreys. San Pablo. 

K. C. Shady. Gorgona. 

M. R. Currie. Bas Obispo. 

I). J. Shannon, L,as Cascadas. 

J. B. JefTries. Eninire. 

C. P. Allen. Culebra. 

Harry Dundas (actin^^). Paraiso. 

Otto Marstrand, Pedro Miguel. 

A. R. Bennct, Corozal. 

B. C. Poole, Ancon. 
W. H. South, I,a Boca. 

C. E- Heisey, Porto Bello. 

Subsistence, 

Headquarters. Cristobal. 
Maj. EugeneT. Wilson. U. S. A.. Subsistence 
Officer. 

\V. F. Shipley. Chief Clerk. 



Civil Admitiistration. 

Headquarters. Ancon. 

Jo C. S. Klackbitrn, Head of the Department. 

II. D. Reed, Executive Secretary. Ancon. 

G. A. Ninas. Chief Clerk. Ancon. 
Tom M. Cooke, Chief. Division of Posts. Cus- 
toms and Revenues, Ancon. 
Herman A. Gudger, Deputy Collector, Ancon. 
E. I,ewis Baker. I^eputy Collector, Cristobal. 
George M. Shontz, Prosecuting Attorney. Ancon, 
George R. Slianton, Chief of Police. Ancon. 

D. E. McDonald. Chief Clerk. 
C. E- Weidman, Chief. Fire Department. Cris- 
tobal. 
Geo. h- Campen, Supt of Public Works. Ancon. 

C. R. Sargent. Chief Clerk. 
J. J. Reidy. Asst. Supt. Public Works, Cristobal. 
H. I,. Smith. Superintendent of Schools. Ancon 
II. A. A. Smith. Treasurer of Canal Zone, Em- 
pire. 

Canal Zone Jndieiary. 

Ileadtiuarters, Ancon. 
Supreme Court — Dr. F. Mutis Durdn, Chitf 
Justice. 

Walter Emery, Clerk. Ancon. 
H. A. Gudger, Associate Justice, F)mpire. 
Lorin C. Collins. Associate Justice. Cristobal. 
Circuit Court. First Circuit— Dr. F. Mutis 
Durdn. Judge, Ancon. 
Walter Emery, Clerk, Ancon. 
Circuit Court. Second Circuit — H. A. Gudger, 
Judge, Empire. 
Elbert M. Goolsby, Clerk. Empire. 
Circuit Court. Third Circuit— IvOrin C. Collins, 
Judge. Cristobal. 

Nelson R. Johnson, Clerk. Cristobal. 
M. C. Rerdell, Senior District Judge, Cristobfil. 
S. E. Rlackbum, District Judge. Ancon. 
Edgar S. Garrison. District Judge. Empire, 
J. B. March, District Judge, Gorgona. 
Thomas T\. Brown, Jr., District Judge, Cristo- 
I«il. 

La-w. 

Headtiuarters. Washington, D. C, 
Richard Reid Rogers, General Counsel. 
Washington, D. C. 

George M. Shontz, Attorney for Isthmian Canal 
Commission and Panama Railroad Company. 
Ancon. 

George H. Bartholomew. Assistant Attorney. 

Sanitation. 

Headquarters, Ancon. 
Col. W. C. Gorgas. Chief Sanitary Officer. 
Capt. Robert E. Noble U. S. A.. Kxecvitive Officer. 
Harry E. Bovay. Chief Clerk. 

H. R. Carter, Director of Hospitals, Ancon. 

Surgeon. J. C. Perry. P. H. and M. H. S.. Chief 
Quarantine Officer. Ancon. 

Maj. John L,. Phillips. U. S. A.. Superintendent 
Ancon Hospital, Ancon. 

Capt. Alexander Murray, U. .S. A., Assistant to 
Superintendent. 

Maj. C. C. McCulloch. jr., U. S. A., General In- 
spector, Ancon. 

J. F. IvCys. U. S. N., Superintendent Colon 
Hospital, Colon. 

Surgeon Claude C Pierce. P. H. and M. H. S. 
Quarantine Officer. Colon. 

Dr. Fleetwood Gruver. P. H.and M.H.S.. Quar- 
antine Officer, Panama. 

Dr. John H. Purnell, Health Officer, Panama. 

Dr. M. E. Connor, Health Officer, Colon. 

Joseph A. I.ePrince. Chief .Sanitary Inspector, 
Ancon. 

Disbursements, 

Headquarters. F'mpire. 
Edward J. Williams, Disbursing Officer. 
Wm. M. Wood, Assistant Di.sbursing Officer. 

Examination of- Accounts, 

Headquarters, Empire, 

W, W, Warwick, Examiner of Accounts. 
Thomas I,. Clear, Chief Clerk. 



Purchasing Department. 

Headquarters, Washington, D. C. 
Capt. F. C. Boggs, U. S. A., General Pur- 
chasing Officer. 

C. H. Dole. Chief Clerk. 

Ca])t. Courtland Nixon. Purchasing Agent on 
the Isthmus. 

Maj. Wendell L. Simpson. U. S. A.. Purchas- 
ing Agent, 24 State Street, New York City. 

F. C. Nord.siek. Assistant Purchasing Agent, 24 
State street, New York City. 

S. V,. Redfem, Assistant Purchasing Agent, 
Custom House. New Orleans. I,a. 



Panama Railroad Company, 

Headquarters. Colon, 
(New York office. 24 State Street.) 
H. J. Slifcr, Assistant to the President, and 
General Manager, Colon. 
G. E- Cieer, Assistant to the C.eneral Manager. 
R. Budd. Chief Engineer. 
J. A. Smith, Suiierintendent. 

MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSEJLS. 

The following is a list of the sailings of the Pan- 
ama Railroad Steamship Company, of the Royal 
Mail Steam Packet Company, of the Hamburg- 
American Line, and of the United Fruit Company's 
I,ine. the Panama Railroad Company's dates being 
subject to change : 

FROM NEW YORK TO COLON. 

Finance P. R. R.Saturday Sept. 26 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Saturday — Sept. 26 

Esperanza P. R. R.Thursday Oct. 1 

Atrato R.-M Saturday Oct. 3 

Advance P. R. R.Wednesday ..Oct. 7 

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm,..H.-A .Saturday Oct. 10 

AUianca P. R. R.Tuesday Oct. 13 

Trent R.-M Saturday Oct. 17 

Colon P. R. R.Saturday ....Oct. 17 

Esperanza P. R. R.Thursday Oct. 22 

Prinz Joachim H,-A Saturday Oct. 24 

Finance P. R^ R.Tuesday Oct. 27 

All the steamers of the Hnmbnrg-American and 
Royal Mail lines call at Kingston enroute to Colon. 

FROM COLON TO NHW YORK. 

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm...H.-A.,. .Tuesday ....Sept. 29 

Allianca P. R. R.Saturd.iy Oct. 3 

Clyde R.-M. .. .Tuesday Oct. 6 

Finance P. R. R.Thursday .. ..Oct. S 

Panama P. R. R.Tuesday Oct. 13 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Tuesday Oct. 13 

Advance P. R. R.Monday Oct. 19 

FROM NEW ORLKANS TO COLON. 

Heridia U.F.C.. Saturday Sept. 26 

Cartago IT.l-'.C.. Saturday Oct. 3 

Parismina U.F.C.. Saturday Oct. 10 

Heridia U.F.C.. Saturday Oct. 17 

Cartago U.F.C.. Saturday Oct. 24 

Parismina U.F.C. Saturday Oct. 31 

Heridia U.F.C.. Saturday Nov. 7 

Cartago U.F.C. .Saturday Nov. 14 

FROM COLON TO NF-W ORLEANS. 

Heridia U.F.C. .Tuesday ....Oct. 6 

Cartago U.F.C. .Tuesday . . . .Oct, 13 

Parismina U.F.C. Tuesday Oct. 20 

Heridia U.F.C. .Tuesday Oct. 27 

Cartago U.F.C. .Tuesday Nov, 3 

Parismina U.F.C. Tuesday Nov. 10 

Heridia U.F.C. Tuesday Nov. 17 

Cartago U.F.C.Tuesday Nov. 24 

Parismina. U.F.C.Tuesday Dec. 1 

FROM COLON TO BARBADOS. CALLING AT TRINIDAD. 

Atrato R.-M Tuesday Oct. 13 

Trent R.-M Tuesday . . . .Oct, 27 

Tagus R.-M Tuesday Nov. 10 

FROM COLON TO NEW ORLEANS VIA KINGSTON. 

Median I.,eyland Ijne about. .Oct. 20 

Mexican I^eyland Line about.. Oct. 31 

The Panama railroad steamships sail at 3 p. m 
from dock at Cristobal direct to New York. 

The Prinz steamers of the Hamburg-American line 
.sail from Colon at 1 p. m. via Kingston. Jamaica, 
for New York. 

All Royal Mailsleamers mentionedabove leave early 
in the morning from Colon via Kingston. Jamaica, 
for New York. All mail and passengers should be 
on board early on day of sailing. 

The steamers of the United Fruit Company's line 
sail from New Orleans at U a. m.. and from Colon 
at 1.30 p. m., via Port Linion. for New Orleans. In 
addition to the above, the ITuited Fruit Company 
dispatches a steamer about every ten days from 
Colon, %-ia Bocas del Toro. for New Orleans. 

Sailings of the French line (Cie, Gen^rale Trans- 
atlantiqne) for Venezuelan ports. Martinique and 
Guadeloupe on the 3d and 20th of each month. 



CANAL 




RECORD 



Volume II. 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, W'EDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1908. 



No. 7. 



The Canal Record 



Published weekly under the authority and supervision of the 
ISTHMIAN CANAL COMMISSION 

"The Canal Recot-d'" is issued J t-ee of ckafge, one 
copy each, to all employes of the Commission and Pan- 
ama Railroad Company whose names are on the "sold" 
roll. Extra copies can be obtained from the ne?i'S 
stands of the Panama Raihoad Company for five cents 
each 

Address all Communications 

THE CANAL RECORD 

Ancon, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama. 

No cojnmunication.eitherjor Publication or reg nest- 
ing injormation, will receive attention unless signed 
with the Juli name and address of the writer. 

NOTES OF PROGRESS. 

Work on the Pacific Locks. 

The hill near the northern end of the 
lock site at Miraflores has entirely disap- 
peared, the last cut of the steam shovels 
having brought it to the level of the remain- 
der of the lock site. Four shovels are at 
work continuing the excavation, and the 
material taken out is placed in the dam 
across the Cocoli River, or in the dyke on 
the east side of the lock site. This dyke is 
being built to form basins into which mate- 
rial will be pumped later by dredges. The 
suction dredge Sandpiper has been moved 
to the south end of the lock site, and it is 
expected that dredging will be begun at this 
point in a few daj-s. 

At the site of the Pedro Miguel Locks the 
excavation in the north approach is down to 
grade 40, which is the depth required for 
this approach, and is practically finished. 
In the lock site proper, one of the shovels 
is making a cut at the 25-foot level, which 
is 15 feet above the grade required at this 
point. Another shovel is working on the 
18-foot level, which is only 8 feet above the 
grade required. An additional shovel was 
set at work last week, and the force now 
consists of two 95-ton and one 75-ton shov- 
els, served b}' five American locomotives 
and trains of Oliver and Western dump 
cars. The amount of material to be exca- 
vated from the lock site and approaches at 
Pedro Miguel has been estimated at 2,742,- 
804 cubic yards, of which amount 1,593,553 
cubic yards have already been excavated. 
The Central Division has excavated 1,517,- 
804 cubic yards from the northern approach, 
and the Pacific Division, up to the first of 
October, had taken out 75,749 cubic yards 
from the lock site, and 11,177 cubic jards 
from the accessory works. The work in the 
lock site began in June, 1908. 

The dyke from Diablo along the prism of 
the Canal to Miraflores, under construction 



for the purpose of retaining the material 
dredged from the channel, is uearing com- 
pletion. It runs along the east side of the 
prism to the lower end of the lock. Sand 
and stone will be transported from La Boca 
over a railroad line running upon the em- 
bankment originally built as the west toe 
of the Sosa-Corozal dam, to Diablo, and 
from Diablo over the Panama railroad tracks 
to Riley's spur, which leads into the Mira- 
flores lock site at the south end, where the 
line will branch off on both sides of the lock 
site, until it reaches the northern end of 
the locks. From that point the road will 
run as a single track to Pedro Miguel. The 
storage bins for material will be located on 
the branches of the railroad track on both 
sides of the locks. A considerable amount 
of the excavation from the lock site at 
Pedro Jlig-uel has been used in building the 
roadbed for this railroad, and a dump has 
been opened alongside the tracks in which 
all of the excavation can be deposited. 

The Canal Medals. 

A ton of copper pipe collected from old 
French excavators and locomotives, some 
bronze bearings taken from cars, locomotives 
and excavators, and 200 pounds of tin found 
in one of the old French warehouses, have 
been collected and will be sent to the Phila- 
delphia Mint, to be used in casting the 
bronze medals which are to be presented by 
the President to employes of the Commis- 
sion, who have served two years or more on 
the Isthmus. It is expected that the medals 
will be ready for distribution early in 1909. 
The design of the medals and the method of 
their distribution have not yet been deter- 
mined. 



Money Order Business. 

The report of the Chief of the Division of 
Posts, Customs and Revenues for the month 
of September shows that 14,822 money or- 
ders, amounting to $429,990.47, were issued, 
a decrease of .§18,228.28 from the amount 
reported for August, which was the largest 
month's business of record in the Zone, and 
amounted to ,<;448,218.7S. Of the ,?429,990.47 
in September there was drawn in orders 
payable in the United States and elsewhere 
,*»317,617.34, and in orders pavable in the 
Canal Zone $112,373.13. The fees collected 
amounted to ,$1, 826. 03, and the amount paid 
and repaid was $130,670.93. 

The largest number of orders, 2,805, was 
issued at Cristobal, and amounted to ,?82,- 
646.51. Empire was second with 2,007 or- 
ders, amounting to $55,912.31; Ancon was 
third in the number of orders issued, 1,503, 
but fourth in the amount, $38,348.45; Gor- 
gonawas fourth in orders issued, with!, 433, 
and third in the amount, $47,635.23; and 
Culebra fifth, with 1,307 orders, aggregating 
$38,253.99. The average amount of all the 
orders issued was $29.01. The largest aver- 



age for a single post-office was at Paraiso, 
with 575 orders, amounting to $19,750.35, 
an average of .'t;34.35 per order, and the 
smallest was at Bohio, where 42 orders were 
issued, aggregating $865.14, an average of 
$20.60. 

A comparative statement of the mone\- or- 
der business transacted at the Zone post- 
offices for the quarter endin.g .September 30, 
1907 and 1908 respectively, is as follows: 



Quarter ending .Sep- 
tember 30. 1908... 

Quarter ending- Sep- 
tember 30, 1907... 



Increase in 1908 

Percentage of incr'se 



Orders 
issued. 



43,494 
32,191 



11,303 
35 



Amount. 



Fees and 
Stamps. 



$1,320,011.73 $22,199.53 
992,086.14 20,228.17 



$327,925.59 
33 



$1,971.36 
9.75 



OfBce Bnildlng for Quartermaster's Depot. 

.\ permanent office building for the Quar- 
termaster's Depot at Mount Hope has been 
authorized. It will be 100 feet long by 75 
feet wide, of the Commission style of 
architecture, and connected with the store- 
house by a covered passageway. In the 
center of the roof will be a skylight and 
ventilator, 15 feet by 20 feet. A private 
office for the Depot Quartermaster, and a 
record room will be partitioned off in two 
corners of the building, and the remainder 
of the office will be a large open room. 



French and American Buildings. 

An inventory of the buildings in the Canal 
Zone on August 1. 190S, shows that there 
were 3,338 of all kinds. When the Ameri- 
cans took possession of the effects of the old 
French company, 2,149 buildings of various 
kinds were included in the sale. Of this 
number it was found profitable to repair 
and use 1,536. Either because they were so 
badly out of repair tint they were unsuited 
for any purpose or because the_\- were in the 
way, 304 of the French buildings have b?en 
demolished. There remain unrepaired 337, 
some of which will be utilized, while others 
will probably be torn down. The Commission 
has constructed 1,494 buildings, so that 
there are now in use in the Canal Zone more 
old French buildings than American struc- 
tures. This showing, however, is merely one 
of units. In general the buildings received 
from the French were small and ill-suited for 
other purposes than laborers' barracks, or 
storehouses. .Some of tlieiu, however, were in 
good condition. Of the 91 buildings left by 
the French at .-^ncon, 88 were repaired, and 
some of them are serving as hospital wards. 
At La Boca 52 out of 65 were worth repair- 
ing; at Culebra, 87 out of 113; at Empire, 86 
out of 92; at Cristobal, Colon, and Folks 
River, 159 out of 235. 

The buildings constructed by the Ameri- 
cans, although less in numlier, are more 
commodious than those left by the French. 
The Americans have built 561 quarters for 



50 



THE CANAL RECORD 



NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



{Continued) . 



gold employes, 93 being of miscellaneous 
types. Bachelor quarters, with 1,424 rooms, 
10+ buildings in all, and 360 quarters capa- 
ble of accommodating S4S families, comprise 
the bulk of the "gold" quarters. Many of 
the old French buildings have been turned 
into quarters for Europe.an and negro labor- 
ers, and in addition the Commission has 
built 192 quarters for silver employes. Of 
this number 141 are barracks for negro bach- 
elors, and some of them will accommodate 
80 laborers. There have been constructed 
741 buildings for miscellaneous occupancy 
and use. This number includes Commission 
hotels, clubhouses, commissaries, lodge 
rooms and chapels, all municipal buildings, 
mess halls and mess kitchens, range clos- 
ets, lavatories, wash houses, 34 office build- 
ings, 75 hospital buildings, 57 shop build- 
ings, and 88 buildings for storage purposes. 

Comtnission Dentists. 

.\t a meeting of the Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission on April 27, 1908, the following ac- 
tion was taken: 

The .Sanitary Departiuent is authorized to employ 
two competent dentists. Tliese dentists shall be em- 
ployes of the Commission, have all the pri\-ileges and 
alloTCaneesof an employe on the gold roll drawing 
$1,800 a year, he furnished by the Commission with 
suitable instr\iments and office furniture, but shall 
receive no salary in money. 

In return for these allowances said dentists shall 
be subject to all the rules and reHulations of the 
Commission, and shall do dental work for employes 
of the Commission and the Panama railroad and 
their families at a tariff fixed by the Chief Sanitary 
O.'Bcer. The dentists shall furnish all necessary ma- 
terial for doing dental work, with the exceptions 
above mentioned. 

In accordance with the above, two dentists 
have been appointed. One is Dr. J. E. 
Grant, who was graduated from the Ivouis- 
viUe (Ky.) College of Dentistry several 
years ago, and who has been practicing his 
profession for the past year at Gorgona. 
He will be .stationed there. The second is 
Dr. O. N. Ruben, who was graduated from 
the Atlanta (Ga.) Dental College in 1902, 
and practiced his profession for two years in 
Georgia. In 1904 he entered the Hospital 
Corps of the United States Army and served 
for several years as an assistant to the den- 
tal surgeons. Since he has been on the 
Isthmus he has practiced his profession in 
connection with his work in the dispensary 
at Empire. He will be stationed at Culebra. 



one year each, 1 for six months, 1 for sixty 
days, and 1 for thirty days, Eight convicts 
were discharged from the penitentiary dur- 
ing the month, leaving a total of 112 in the 
penitentiary on September 30. The num- 
ber of district prisoners on the same date 
was 220. The value of the work performed 
by convicts on roads, etc., amounted to 
§1,790.45. The total effective police force 
on September 30 was 144, and the pay roll 
amounted to §17. 773. 11. 

There were 18 violent deaths requiring ac- 
tion by the coroner during the month. Six of 
these deaths were caused by railroad acci- 
dents and 2 bv drowning. 



September Police Report. 

The September report of the Chief of 
Police shows that 539 persons, representing 
39 countries, were arrested in the Canal 
Zone during the month. This is an in- 
crease of 151 for the month, there having 
bean 488 arrests in August. Of the 639 
persons arrested, 599 were men, and 40 were 
women, and they were for 45 diflterent 
offenses. They were divided among the 
towns of the Zone as follows: Ancon 32, 
Ivas Sabanas 2, La Boca 25, Corozal 13, Mi- 
raflores 10, Pedro Miguel 7, Paraiso 19, Cu- 
lebra 64, Empire 87, Las Cascadas 75, Bas 
Obispo 13, Gorgona 98, San Pablo 16, Taber- 
nilla 24, Bohio 6, Gatun 48, Cristobal 100. 

Seventy-one cases were tried in the courts, 
14 of which were dismissed, 47 continued, 
and 10 in which convictions were procured. 
Of the 10 persons convicted, 5 were fined 
and 5 sentenced to the penitentiary, 2 for 



Commissiori Action. 

.\t the meeting of the Isthmian Canal 
Commission, held September 21, 1908, the 
following resolution was adopted: 

Resolved, That except for causes mani- 
festly bevond prevention by any action of the 
empiove. no exception will be made to the 
rule embodied in the General Conditions of 
Employment adopted at the 129th meeting 
of the Commission, providing that employes 
not reporting for duty within fifteen days 
after expiration of leave will forfeit the right 
to pay for leave period. Employes are ex- 
pected to report for dirty on the expiration 
of their authorized leave, the additional fif- 
teen davs, return within which will preserve 
their right to pay during leave, being in- 
tended to cover ail contingencies and not to 
be considered additional leave without pa}-. 

The rule referred to in the above resolu- 
tion is as follows: 

Employes not reporting for duty within 
fifteen days after expiration of leave will 
forfeit the right to pay for leave period. 



Transfer of Allotments. 

The division engineers have been informed 
that there will be no transfer of allotments 
between the three construction divisions of 
the Department of Construction and Engi- 
neering on account of work performed by one 
division for another. For work performed 
for the Department of Civil Administration 
and Sanitation tlie construction divisions will 
receive credit by transfer of appropriation. 
The construction divisions will not, how- 
ever, receive credit for work performed for 
the Quartermaster's Department such as the 
construction of corrals, storehouses and 
roads, as all of this work is paid for from 
the appropriatioix for the Department of 
Construction and Engineering. In dividing 
equally between the three construction di- 
visionsand the Quartermaster's Department 
the funds available during the present fiscal 
year for building construction and municipal 
improvements, it was the intention that 
these allotments should fix the amount of 
work of this character to be performed by 
each division, and consequently no transfer 
of allotment can be made. 

Flag Stops for Saaday Night Train. 

The General Manager of the Panama Rail- 
road Company announces that beginning 
Sunday, October 11, train No. 30, which 
leaves Panama at 10 p. m., will stop at any 
station in the Zone upon request to conduc- 
tor by a passenger holding a through ticket 
from Panama. Passengers boarding the 
train at a flag stop, holding tickets to a 
station that is not a scheduled stop, do so 
at their own risk as the train will stop at 
flag stations only for passengers from Pan- 
ama. 



HEALTH REPORT FOR SEPTEMBER. 

Comparison for Three Years. 

Ancon, C. Z., October 10, 1908. 
To the Acting Chairman and Cliii'f Engineer, Cule- 
bra, Canat Zone. 

Sir — I herewith forw-ard report of the San- 
itary Department for the month of Sep- 
tember. 

The health conditions continue, I think, 
to be all that could be expected. lam dis- 
appointed that the sick rate had not begun 
to fall this September as it had done in all 
previous years. The rates for the past three 
years, comparing .•\ugust and September, are 

as follows: 

,, .. ,. Constantly Rate per 

Month- I-orce. ^j^^ thousand. 

1906— August 29,935 1.260 42.67 

.September 2S.26.? 1.064 37.74 

1907— August 40,443 1,174 29.02 

September 41,062 1.141 27.78 

1903— August 44,225 1,116 25:24 

September 45.058 1,130 25.09 

However we had the satisfaction of seeing 
from this table that the rate for this Sep- 
tember is considerably less than the rate 
for the preceding September quoted. The 
sick rate for September, 1908, is nearly 12 
per thousand less than the sick rate for Sep- 
tember, 1906. This means, other conditions 
being the same, that we saved in September, 
1908, over September, 1906, in our working 
force, 16,200 days of sickness. 

Taking the death rate of our laboring 
force, the comparison is equally good: 

Month— Force. Deaths. Rate. . 

1905— September 19.6S5 65 33.52 

1905— September 28,264 135 57.34 

1907— September 41.062 98 28.63 

190i— September 45,058 48 12.78 

In our laboring force for the last six 
months the negro death rate has been almost 
as low, and in several months lower than the 
white. Up to three or four months ago the 
contrary had been the case, the negro death 
rate frequently being three or four times that 
of the whites. 

During the past month the white death 
rate in our force was more than twice as 
great as that of the negroes. For some rea- 
son the whites seem very much more exposed 
to death bv accident than do the negroes. 
Of the 19' deaths among the whites last 
month, 12 (more than half) were due to vio- 
lence; of the 29 deaths among negroes, 5 
were due to violence. 

The death rates among the whites and ne- 
groes for the month of September for the 
past three years has been as follows: 

1906. 

Force. Deaths. Rates. 

White. Colored. White. Colored. White. Colored. 

5.603 22.661 7 128 15 67.81 

1907. 
11.662 29,400 25 73 25.72 29.79 

1908. 
12,370 32,688 19 29 18.43 10.65 

In the three years, the negro death rate 
has fallen from 67 per thousand to 10 per 
thousand. 

Upon the whole, in our present condition, 
I would consider the number of cases of ma- 
laria as the best index of the conditions of 
our sanitation. In August, we admitted to 
our hospitals, among employes, 1,525 cases 
of malaria; in September, 1,410; a satisfac- 
tory improvement for this time of the year. 
In 'September, 1907, we admitted in hospi- 
tals 1,811 cases of malaria among employes, 
showing this year an improvement of 401 
cases, which 'indicates a considerable de- 
crease in malaria cases during the year. 

No case of yellow fever or bubonic plague 
has occurred in the Zone of the Canal within 
the past two years. Very respectfully, 

W. C. GORGAS, 

ChieJ Sanitary Officer 



THE CANAL RECORD 



51 



FATAL EXPLOSIONS OF DY NAMITfi. 

Thirty Casualties in Two Accidents. 

Twelve men are dead and eighteen are in- 
jured as a result of two explosions of dynamite 
that occurred on the Canal work last week. 
The first explosion was in Culebra Cut near 
Empire where five men were killed and 
eight injured, and the second was near 
Mindi where seven were killed, ten injured, 
and one is missing, but it is believed he be- 
came frightened and ran away. 

The explosion in Culebra Cut occurred 
about 1.15 o'clock in the afternoon of Octo- 
ber 8. Steam shovel 210 was making a cut 
through some material recently blasted and, 
it is believed, a shovel tooth struck the cap 
of an unexploded charge of dynamite. In 
the explosion David R. Davies, the steam 
shovel engineer, William Colburn, and Sam- 
uel Sobers, pitmen, were killed instantly. 
William Goodley, who was acting as crane- 
man, was so badly injured that he died 
shortly after the accident, and Joseph Carter, 
a laborer, died from his injuries on Octo- 
ber 10. Samuel Goddard, Thomas Trotman, 
Walter Archer, .\ubrey Lane, and Edward 
Clarke, pitmen; and Adolph Samuels, Wil- 
liam Christian, and John Benjamin, laborers, 
were injured, but it is believed they will re- 
cover. .A.11 the dead and injured were ne- 
groes except the engineer and thecraneman. 

David R. Davies was 32 years of age and 
unmarried. His home was in Girard, Ohio, 
and he had been working on the Canal 
since March 9, 1908. A brother, John L. 
Davies of Culebra, survives him. 

William Goodley, the craneman, was 21 
years of age, unmarried, and had been liv- 
ing on the Isthmus since February 2, 1907 . 
His home was at 2,544 Hope street, Phila- 
delphia, Pa., where his mother lives. His 
father, Robert L. Goodley, is an employe of 
the Commission and lives at Empire. 

The explosion near Mindi occurred about 
10.30 o'clock in the morning of October 10. 
The dredges that are making the channel 
from Limon Bay to Mindi have worked their 
way into the shore of the bay where the ma- 
terial encountered, blue mud and coral 
rock, is so hard that it must be blasted 
before it can be handled economically. 

During the morning the blasting party 
had practically completed its work of prepar- 
ing a blast of 24,650 pounds of 60 per cent 
dynamite. One hundred and fiftj'-four holes, 
15-foot centers, 50 feet deep in sand and 
rock, covering an area of 150 by 200 feet, 
were almost ready when a thunder shower 
came up. The men were ordered away and 
remained until after the shower, when they 
returned to complete their work. No con- 
nection had been made with the batter}^ al- 
though all the holes but two had been con- 
nected with the main wires. Withoui. an}' 
known cause the blast was exploded, and 
therefore it is ascribed to a bolt of lightning. 

Six negroes, Edward Lord, John Cyrus, 
Charles Henry, Sanmel Archer, Edward 
Price, and Herbert Sandiford, were killed 
almost instantly. Benjamin Prescott, also a 
negro laborer, died at Colon hospital on Oc- 
tober 12. One negro laborer, Samuel Brew- 
ster, is missing, but it is believed he was 
uninjured. Two white men. H.T. McCrabbe 
and J. A. Clark, were injured, but not seri- 
ously. Mr. Clark was thrown some dis- 
tance and his ankle was sprained. Brown 
Beckles, Garnet Graves, George Eason, 



Wesley White, Augustine Murphy, Richard 
Inniss, Henry Best, and William Brewster, 
negro laborers, were also injured, but will 
probably recover. 

The law providing compensation for em- 
ployes injured in the service of the Commis- 
sion was published in full in The Canai, 
Record of June 17, from which the follow- 
ing extract is taken: 

That when on or after August 1. 3905, any person 
in hazardous employment under the Isthmian Canal 
Commission is injured in the course of such employ- 
ment, such employe shall be entitled to receive for 
one year thereafter, unless such employe, in the 
opinion of the Secretary of Commerce and Labor be 
sooner able to resume work, the same pay as if lie 
continued to be employed, such payment to be made 
under such regulations, as the Secretary of Com- 
merce and Labor may prescribe: Provided. That no 
compensation shall be paid under this Act where the 
injury is due to the negligence or misconduct of the 
eluplo^■e injured, nor unless said injury shall con- 
tinue for more than fifteei. days. All questions of 
negligence or misconduct shall be determined by the 
Secretary of Commere and Labor. 

Sec. 2. Tliat if any artisan or laborer so employed 
shall die during the said year by reason of such 
injury received in the course of such employment, 
lea\'ing a witlow, or a child or children under sixteen 
years of age. or a dependent parent, such widow and 
child or children and dependent parent shall be en- 
titled to receive, in such portions and under such 
regulations as the Secretary of Commerce and Labor 
may prescribe, the same amount, for the remainder 
of thesaid year, that said artisan or laborer would be 
entitled to receive as pay if such employe were alive 
and continued to be eniploved: Provided. That if the 
widow shall die at any time during the said year her 
portion of said amount shall be added to the amount 
to be paid to the reiniining beneficiaries under the 
pro\isions of the section, if there be any. 

A decision of the Comptroller of the Treas- 
ury, published in The Canal Record of 
September 16, limits the benefit of this law 
to persons whose injuries "continue" fif- 
teen da}'s or more. 



Canal Zone Treasury. 

The Canal Zone Treasury was separated 
from the Disbursing Office on October 1, and 
all revenues from the postal service, the 
courts and regular taxes, such as license, 
land rents, and building permits, are now 
paid into the Treasur}'. These revenues 
amount to about $300,000 a year. Congress 
directed in the Sundry Civil Appropriation 
Act of May 27, 1903, that these revenues be 
expended as follows: 

The revenues derived from the postal service to the 
maintenance of that ser\'ice; the remaining revenues 
after setting aside a miscellaneous and contingent 
fund of ten thousand dollars, to the maintenance of 
the public school system in the Zone: to the con- 
struction and maintenance of public in'iprovements 
within the Zone: to the maintenance of the adminis- 
trative districts, including payment of salaries and 
wages incident thereto: to the maintenance of Canal 
Zone charity patients in the hospitals of the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission, and to the maintenance of 
administrative district prisoners. 



Inspection by Ne-rcspaper Men. 

The General Manager of the Panama rail- 
road took a part)' of Isthmian newspaper 
men and the local correspondents of the 
Associated Press and United Press, on a 
tour of inspection of the Canal and railroad 
relocation work on October 11. On each of 
the three construction divisions an engineer 
acquainted with the various phases of the 
work joined the party and assisted in ex- 
plaining the various features. 

The steamship Si/via. from Baltimore, arrived at 
Colon October? with 1,000.000 pounds of dynamite: 
300 tons of pipe and pipe fittings ; 400 cases and 600 
drums of gasolene: 1,2C0 tons of steel bars and 
plates : 350 kegs of track spikes: 36,577 pieces of drain 
tile, and an assorted cargo of furniture, oil and ma- 
chinery. 



LETTERS FROM THE LINE, 

{Cojnmiinicationsto tkiscolitmn nmst be signed in each 
instance "with the name and address o/ the zt/riter.) 

Memorial Resolutions. 

The Can.\l Record: 

Will you kindly publish the following res- 
olutions. 

E. M. PULLEN, 
President. Local No. S.A. U. of S. S. & D. 

Whereas, Our Heavenly Father has re- 
moved from our midst Brother David R. 
Davies; therefore be it 

Resolved, That Panama Local, No 5, As- 
sociated Union of Steam Shovel and Dredge- 
men has lost from its ranks a most worthy 
brother, respected and loved by his acquiint- 
ances and friends, and whose sterling 
qualities and noble character have endeared 
him to every member of our order; and be 
it further 

Resolved, That we extend our sincere and 
heartfelt sympathj' to his sorrowing relatives 
in their hour of bereavement; and be it 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions 
be spread upon the records of our order 
and copies sent to each of his relatives. 
Committee on Resolutions, 

Associated Union of Steam Shovel and Dredsetnen. 
Culebra, October 11, 1908. 

Card of Thanks. 

The C.iNAi, Record: 

I wish to thank the steam shovel engi- 
neers and cranemen who participated in the 
funeral of my son on October 9. 

R. L. Goodlev. 

Empire, C. Z., October 11, 1908. 



Notice to Steam Shovel Men. 

The C.^nal Record: 

President George Buchan, of Local No. 19, 
requests all members of the I. B. of S. S. 
and D. M. to attend a meeting on Sunday, 
October 18, at 2 p. m., at the Panazone, Pan- 
ama. 

vS. I. Lyons, 

Secretary- Treasurer. 
Empire C. Z., October 5, 190S. 



Ohio Clnb. 

The Canal Record: 

A temporary organization for an Ohio 
Club at Empire has been effected, and a 
meeting to form a permanent organization 
is called for Friday, October 16, 1908, at the 
Commission Clubhouse, at 8 p. m. Buck- 
eves turn out please. 

J. P. Mead, 

Temporary Chairman. 
Empire, C. Z., October 9, 1908. 

Notice to Kangaroos. 

All Kangaroos in good standing desiring 
to become charter members Ancon Court, 
No. 7, arerequested to meet on Sunda\', Octo- 
ber 18, at 1 p. m., in the hall over the office 
of the District Quartermaster in Ancon (near 
Hotel Tivoli), for the purpose of electing its 
officers. By order of 

Sam. B. Dannis. 



Where Is John Lomasney? 

The Canal Record: 

I want to know the whereabouts of John 
Lomasney, of New York city. When last 
beard from, one year ago, he was employed 
as a cook in the I. C. C. hotel in Empire. 
Will anyone, who may know of his where- 
abouts, communicate with the undersigned. 
A. O'Donnell. 

Tabernilla, C. Z., October 6, 1908. 



52 



THE CANAL RECORD 



THE WATER SUPPLY, 

Billion and a Half Galloas for the Dry 
Season. 

Water is flowing over the spillway at Rio 
Grande and Carabali, two of the four res- 
ervoirs that supply most of the settlements 
in the Canal Zone. That at Brazos Brook 
is almost full; and the fourth, Camacho, 
already contains 130,000,000 gallons. Until 
the end of the rainy season the daily con- 
sumption will be much less than the amount 
collected by the almost daily rains. The 
amount of water actuallj' impounded in the 
four big reservoirs at their capacity is 1,513,- 
537,000 gallons, and the average daily con- 
sumption in the fiscal year 1908, was 1,249, 625 
gallons. These reservoirs will be full at the 
beginning of the dry season, and on the 
basis of daily consumption remaining the 
same as it was in 1908, the supply will be 
twice as great as the consumption. 

Whenever the population is sufficient to 
justifj- or make necessary the maintenance 
of a reservoir, one has been built. The 
city of Panama and the group of American 
settlements near it, including Ancon, La 
Boca, East La Boca, Corozal, Miraflores, 
Pedro Miguel, Paraiso, and Culebra, are sup- 
plied from the Rio Grande reservoir, which 
is located between Culebra and Paraiso. Ca- 
macho reservoir, in the hills west of Empire, 
supplies Empire, Las Cascadas, and Bas 
Obispo. Carabali reservoir, near Gorgona, 
supplies Matachin, Bas Matachin, Gorgona, 
Juan Grande, and Mamei, From Mamei 
north to Gatun most o f the Canal prism lies in 
Gatun Lake, and no American settlements of 
sufficient size to require a reservoir supply 
of water are located in this territory. Colon, 
Cristobal, and Mount Hope, are supplied 
from Brazos Brook reservoir. Other .Amer- 
ican settlements, such as San Pablo, Taber- 
nilla, and Gatun, are supplied by water 
pumped from nearly streams. 

The water in the reservoirs is drawn from 
territory carefully watched by inspectors, 
who see that the basin is kept clean. Vege- 
tation is cut to the water's edge before the 
beginning of the rainy season, and a bacteri- 
ologist from the Bureau of Plant Industry in 
Washington keeps constant watch to dis- 
cover evidences of infection and to antici- 
pate any unpleasant odor, or taste, that 
might be given to the water by algae 
growth. 

Rio Grande reservoir is a lake 65 acres 
in area, formed by building a dam across 
the mountain stream known as the Rio 
Grande. It has a drainage area of 2,015 
acres and the surface of the water, when 
level with the spillway, is 238 feet above 
mean sea-level. Its storage capacity is 496,- 
670,000 gallons, and the average daily con- 
sumption from this source in the fiscal year 
1908 was 2,574,000 gallons. At the clos'e of 
the dry season, when the water had reached 
its lowest level, on May 1, 1908, there re- 
mained in this reservoir 228,423,000 gallons 
of water, an amount sufficient for three 
months more had the supply not been re- 
plenished by the heavy rains from that time 
forth. .Water from this reservoir is supplied 
by pumping to the higher levels in the vil- 
lages of Culebra, Paraiso, Cucaracha, and 



Ancon. A pressure filter located at Ancon 
filters the water that is supplied to the city 
of Panama, and an additional unit for this 
plant is contemplated in order that filtered 
water may be supplied to the -American set- 
tlements at .\ncon and La Boca. 

Camacho reservoir is formed by impound- 
ing the Camacho River, the spillway of the 
dam being at an elevation of 365 feet above 
mean sea-level. The watershed from which 
the supply is collected, is 592 acres in area, 
and the area of the reservoir at the eleva- 
tion of the spillway is 38.36 acres. The ca- 
pacity at this elevation is 295,867,000 gal- 
lons, all but about 16,000,000 of which is 
available for distribution through the main 
which taps the reservoir at elevation 325. 
The annual consumption from this reservoir 
in 1908, was 131, 765,000 gallons, and when 
the water was at its lowest point, at the close 
of the dry season, there remained a supply 
sufficient for 75 days. Water is supplied by 
gravity to all points except the higher levels 
of Empire, which are supplied b,v pumping. 

Carabali is the smallest of the Zone res- 
ervoirs, its capacity being only 80,000,000 
gallons. It is formed b}' a dam across Car- 
abali River, and the spillway is at elevation 
75.3. Its drainage area is 1,552 acres, and 
the area of the water at spillway eleva- 
tion is 23 acres. It is adequate to supply 
the present demands, but the growth of 
Gorgona and the hamlets near it has been so 
great that an additional reservoir has been 
located in the valley immediately above the 
present reservoir at an elevation of 110 feet. 
The new reservoir, if constructed, will have 
a capacity of 153,000,000 gallons. 

The reservoir which supplies Colon, Cris- 
tobal, and Mount Hope is located in the val- 
ley of Brazos Brook, near Mount Hope, at an 
elevation of 48.5 feet above mean sea-level. 
It has a drainage area of 640 acres and a lake 
area of 120 acres. The capacity is 641,000,000 
gallons, and the consumption for the fiscal 
year 1908 was 457,544,000 gallons. Water 
from this reservoir is filtered before being de- 
livered, and on account of the large amount 
of vegetable matter which it carries in sus- 
pension, it will be passed through a sedimen- 
tation basin before going to the filters. 

At Tabernilla a pumping station is main- 
tained, from which water taken from the 
Frijoles River, a hill-fed stream, is pumped 
to the hamlets between San Pablo and Fri- 
joles. A distillation plant at the pumping 
station furnishes 1,000 gallons of distilled 
water daily to the American residents at Ta- 
bernilla, and the pumping station supplies 
in all 500,000 gallons each day. A similar 
pumping station near Gatun supplies that 
village with water taken from the Gatun- 
cillo River, from which it is pumped to a 
tank located on oneofthe hills in the village. 

For general purposes it is sufiScient to say 
of the water that tests show it is healthful. 
For those who may inquire more deeply, 
the following chemical and bacteriological 
data show the differences in the chemical 
and bacterial content at the end of the wet 
and dry seasons. The data given for the 
end of the dry season 1908, are compiled 
from samples taken at Rio Grande, Camacho, 
and Carabali on May 20, and at Brazos 
Brook on May 21. The data for the end of 
the rainy season are for samples taken on 



November 16, 1907, at Rio Grande, Camacho, 
and Brazos Brook, and on November 20, at 
Carabali. 

PBRIOD OF GREATEST DILUTION— END OF 
WET SEASON. 





Parts per Million. 




Rio 
Grande 


Ca- 
macho. 


Cara- 
bali. 


Brazos 
Brook. 


Color 


30 
45 

1.0 

4.3 

0.047 
0.231 
None 

Trace 
103 

41 
3 


20 
54 

1.5 

3.8 

0.043 
0.214 
None 
Trace 
111 
46 
0.1 


25 
62 

3.0 

3.7 

0.028 
0.338 
None 

Trace 
1.^7 

47 
1 


23 


Alkalinity 


28 
3 5 


Chlorine 


O.xygen Cons 

Nitrogen As — 

Free Atiira 

Alb. Anxm 

Nitrites 


4.3 

0.027 
0.324 


Nitrates 




Total solids 


90 


Loss on igrnition 

1 ron 


43 
1 











PERIOD OF GREATEST CONCENTRATION- 
OF DRY SEASON. 



■END 



Color 

Alkalinity 

Chlorine 

Oxygen Cons 

Nilrog-en As- 
Free Anim 

Alb. Anira 

Nitrites 

Nitrates , 

Total solids 

Loss on ignition. 

Iron 



Parts pee 


Million. 


Rio 


Ca- 


Cara- 


Brazos 


Grande 


macho. 


bali. 


Brook. 


20 


15 


25 


100 


67 


73 


61 


30 


4.0 


4.0 


6.0 


5.5 


4.1 


4.2 


6.3 


5.3 


0.072 


0.064 


0,180 


0.292 


0.280 


0.403 


0.428 


0.456 


0.003 


Trace 


0.003 


0.001 


None 


None 


Trace 


Trace 


113 


115 


139 


89 


26 


29 


35 


37 


0.2 


0.3 


0.3 


2.0 



BACTERIOLOGICAL DATA. 



Date. 


Source. 


Bacteria 
per C. C. 


Nov. 16. 1907.... 


Rio Grande Reser\'oir 


950 


Nov. 16. 1907.... 


Camacho Resen'Oir 


1.900 


Nov. 20. 1907.... 


Carabali Resen-oir 


3.300 


Nov. 16, 1907.... 


Brazos Brook Reservoir... 


13,500 


May 20. 1908.... 


Rio Grande Reservoir 


130 


May 20. 1903.... 


Camacho Reser\'oir 


250 


May 20, 1908.... 


Carabali Reservoir 


300 


May 20. 1908.... 


Brazos Brook Reservoir... 


3,500 



University Clnb Election. 

The annual meeting for the election of 
officers of the University Club will be held 
in the clubhouse, Panama, on Sunday, Oc- 
tober 18. The ballot box will be open from 
9 a. m. to 3 p. m., Panama railroad time. 
On Saturday evening, October 17, a smoker 
will be given in the clubhouse, and a special 
train for the free use of members along the 
line of the Canal will leave Colon at 5.50 p. 
m., stopping at Gatun, Bohio, Tabernilla, 
San Pablo, Gorgona, Bas Obispo, Las Cas- 
cadas, Empire, Culebra, Pedro Miguel, Mira- 
flores, and Corozal. This train will not re- 
turn from Panama on Saturday night, in- 
asmuch as the annual meeting occurs on 
the following day, and it is thought that 
members who attend the smoker will desire 
to remain over night in Panama. 



Commission Clubhouses. 

On Tuesday evening. Octobers, the Culebra indoor 
baseball and basketball teams visited Empire. Cule- 
bra won the baseball game, but Empire took the bas- 
ketball by a score of 28 to 13. During the intermission 
gold medals were presented to the Empire basket- 
b.iU team of last season in honor of their winning 
the first championship of the Canal Zone. Members 
of the team were : G. M. MacAdam. captain : R, B. 
Potter. G. W. Lyon, O. J. Reech. J. M. LaRoseaud 
D. Fletcher. 

Thursday evening. October 8, an association smoker 
was held at Gorgona. The program was made 
up of vocal and instrumental solos, selections by the 
orchestra, a boxing bout, wrestling bout, basketball 
game and a supper consisting of coffee, sandwiches, 
pie and cake. 

Saturday evening, October 10. a billiard and pool 
team, consisting of five men from Cristobal, played 
a tournament with Gorgona's team. An interesting 
feature of the match was the close scores— 81-100. 
S6-100, 97-100. 98-100. Cristobal won two out of three 
in pool ; the teams broke even on billiards, each 
taking a game. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



53 



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE. 

Wornea*s Clitbs and Other Features. 

Monday, October 12, was the first anni- 
versary of the organization of the Canal 
Zone Federation of Women's Clubs, which 
was effected at the Hotel Tivoli. At that 
meeting delegates were present from seven 
of the eight clubs which had been organized 
at the different towns in the Zone, as were 
also a number of visitors. The organization 
was created under the direction of Miss 
Helen Varick Boswell, and some of the offi- 
cers elected by the delegates are still hold- 
ing office, notably the president, Mrs. Ivorin 
C. Collins, and two vice-presidents, Mrs. W. 
C. Gorgas and Jlrs. Chester Harding. A 
number of new officers have been elected, 
as many of the charter members have left 
the Isthmus. During the year the organ- 
i7.ation has been placed on a working basis 
and divided into departments for the unifi- 
cation of club effort. 

Three meetings of the Federation have 
been held. The first was at Cristobal on 
January 4. The morning session was de- 
voted to reports and general Federation busi- 
ness, and in the afternoon a social session 
was held with music and addresses, followed 
by a reception. The second meeting of the 
Federation was held at Empire on the invi- 
tation of the local Woman's Club on April 
18. The business meeting was followed by 
a reception tendered to the honorarv presi- 
dent, Mrs. George W. Goethals, at which 
more than 300 women were present. The 
third meeting was held on September 28, at 
Gorgona, and was attended by about 100 
women, including guests. 

The Federation includes at present eight 
clubs, Ancon, Pedro Miguel, Culebra, Em- 
pire, Las Cascadas, Gorgona, Gatun, and 
Cristobal, and has a total membership of 
about 500. 

The Cristobal Woman's Club opened its 
regular session with a meetingon October 7, 
in the Commission clubhouse, with a good 
attendance. In the absence of the president 
the second vice-president, Mrs. Hiram J. Sli- 
f er, presided, and gave a short address of wel- 
come to the members. Mr?. W. J. Rodman 
was elected treasurer, and seven new mem- 
bers were admitted. The report of the del- 
egate to the biennial meeting in Boston was 
read by Mrs. Thomas E. Brown, Jr. At the 
close of the business meeting a concert pro- 
gram was given, in which Mrs. Frank 
Wright, Mrs. Frank Ulrich, Miss Anne 
Palmer, and Miss Ulrich took part. Tea was 
served and the social half hour was enjoj-ed 
by the members and their guests. 

The Culebra Woman's Club announces the 
arrival of the books ordered for the course 
of study which is to be the winter's work. 
The course provides for a study of Conti- 
nental countries, and England, Ireland, 
and Scotland. The next regular meeting of 
the club will take place on Thursday, Octo- 
ber 15. It is desired that all members and 
prospective members who are interested in 
the course should be present to arrange the 
time of meeting and the work for the year. 

The Isthmian Dancing Club of Culebra 
gave its regular monthly dance at the club- 
house on Saturday evening, October 10. 

The wedding of Miss Mamie Calvit, 
daughter of the president of the Gorgona 
Woman's Club, to Mr. Theodore Sundquist 
took place at the residence of the bride's 



parents on Wednesday evening, October 
7, the ceremony being performed b}' the 
Rev. J. H. Sobey. A large number of guests 
were present. Mr. and Mrs. Sundquist will 
live at Gorgona. 

The annual meeting of the .-^ncon Wom- 
an's Club was held at the Hotel Tivoli on 
Wednesday afternoon, October 7, when there 
was a large attendance. Among the impor- 
tant reports was that of the chairman of the 
library committee who placed the books in 
circulation. The books are exchangeable 
only on club days, and the usual fine of five 
cents a week will be imposed for the reten- 
tion of a book over the period between the 
two meetings. Mrs. A. R. Bennett was 
appointed permanent chairman of the library 
committee, and Mrs. A. R. Stroup, assistant 
librarian. A standing rule will be adopted 
which will make the librarian a member of 
the governing board. The club librarj' is 
small, but contains some of the most recent 
popular works of fiction, as well as a small 
selection of standard works. It is hoped 
that this department of the club will be in- 
creased as the jear advances. 

Interest in the election of officers for the 
year ran high and the voting b}- ballot resulted 
in the following selections: President, Mrs. 
C. C. McCulIoch, Jr.; first vice-president, 
Mrs. H. R. Trask; second vice-president, 
Mrs. B. W. Paj-ne; recording secretary, Mrs. 
Cliarles W. Boxer; corresponding secretary, 
Mrs. W. T. Dozier; treasurer, Mrs. R. W. 
Fenn. Meetings of the different depart- 
ments for the purpose of electing their 
chairmen are being held and the governing 
board, which includes the officers, heads of 
departments and one director from each 
department, will meet before October 21 
to arrange its work for the year. It has 
been decided to unite the educational and 
literary departments, at least during the 
first half of the year, and meetings of these 
combined departments will be held regularly. 

The members of the Ancon Nurses' Li- 
brary have decided to sell their books in 
favor of the projected Ancon Library Asso- 
ciation, and the four hundred or more vol- 
umes of which it is composed will be sold 
at a private auction among the members of 
the hospital staff, and later will be open to 
outside purchasers. 

Election of officers for the Pedro Miguel 
Woman's Club for the next six months was 
held at the meeting on October 7 at the 
club rooms. The following were elected : 
President, Mrs. A. L. Waters ; secretary, 
Mrs. W. I. Barnes ; treasurer, Mrs. W. J. 
Piper. During the meeting several matters 
of public importance were taken up for dis- 
cussion. Twenty-five dollars was voted for 
the piano fund as a result of the recent en- 
tertainment. The meeting on Wednesday, 
October 14, will be entirely social, a recep- 
tion being given to the retiring and to the 
newly elected officers. 

A dance was given by the hospital staff at 
Colon Hospital on F'riday evening, October 
9, to which a number of residents of Cristo- 
bal were invited. 

The Cristobal Bachelors' Club will give 
a dance at the Commission clubhouse on 
Saturday evening, October 17. 



PERSONAL, 

Surgeon H. R. Carter, P. H. and M. H. S., 
Director of Hospitals, accompanied by his 
wife and daughter, sailed from Colon on the 
Heredia, October 6, for a leave of absence 
of six weeks, to be spent in Costa Rica. 
During Dr. Carter's absence Maj. C. C. Mc- 
CulIoch, Jr., will act as Director of Hospitals. 

Mr. Caleb M. Saville, assistant engineer, 
of Culebra, accompanied by his wife and son, 
returned to the Isthmus on the R. M. steam- 
ship Atrato on October 11. 

Lieut. Frank O. Whitlock, 14th Cavalry, 
U. S. A., arrived on the Esperanza on Oc- 
tober 8, and has been assigned to duty as 
assistant to the Subsistence Officer. Mr. 
Whitlock was graduated from the Military 
Academy at West Point in 1900, and since 
then has served at Columbus B-irracks, in 
the Phillipine Islands, and as an instructor 
at the Militarj- Academy, where he has been 
since 1903. For a short time in 1905 he was 
assigned to duty on the Isthmus. 

Mr. Henry Goldmark, designing engi- 
neer, and a force of ten assistants who have 
been transferred from the Washington office 
to Culebra, arrived on the Esperama on 
October 8. They- will be under the Direc- 
tion of the Assistant Chief Engineer. 

Mr. G. B. Strickler, Resident Engineer at 
Corozal, accompained by Mrs. Strickler, 
sailed for the States on the Finance, Octo- 
ber 8. 

Among the passengers returning to the 
Isthmus on the Esperanza, which arrived at 
Cristobal on October 8, were: Maj. Edgar 
Jadwin and family of Gatun, A. B. Nichols 
of Culebra, Dr. Perry B. Preston of Paraiso, 
and Dr. Albert R. Warner of Colon Hospital. 

Among the passengers on the Carlago, 
which arrived at Colon on October 8, from 
New Orleans, were: Dr. Robert E. Noble 
and wife, and Dr. James M. Melton of An- 
con, and Mrs. A. S. Zinn and family of 
Empire. 

Obituary, 

William J. McKee, of Paraiso, died at An- 
con hospital on October 8, of pernicious ma- 
larial fever. He w'as a naturalized American 
citizen, having been born in Ireland in 
1863, and had been on the Isthmus for four 
months. He was unmarried. His nearest 
relative was a brother, Robert McKee, who 
lives at Newcastle, England. 



The Panama Railroad Company has com- 
pleted the furnishing of its quarters for bach- 
elor employes in Panama. The quarters 
will accommodate forty men. 



Cristobal Uaion Sunday School. 

The Cristobal Union Sunday School, which 
was organized about a year ago, was reorgan- 
ized on Sundaj', October 4, with the follow- 
ing officers: M. J. Stickel, acting superin- 
tendent; C. L. Van Zant, secretary; Miss 
Florence Fuller, Miss Goodrich, Mrs. M. C. 
Smith, Miss May Hammond, and Messrs. 
Riddle, Stickel and Judge Thomas E.Brown, 
Jr., teachers; Miss Louise Kurath, Mrs. 
Thomas E. Brown, Jr., Mrs. J. A. Smith 
and Mr. A. A. Simka, substitute teachers. 
The International lessons are used, and the 
school is intended for the benefit of all chil- 
dren not enrolled in other Sunday schools. 
The annual rally took place on October 10, 
when an address was made by Mrs. Hiram 
J. Slifer. 

The ste.imship Eastjields. from Gulfport, arrived at 
Colon October 8 with 54.975 linear feet of piling and 
167,009 feet of lumber.. 



54 



THE CANAL RECORD 



STEAM SHOVEL RECORDS. 

Work of the Shovels in September. 

The steam shovels at work on the Canal 
excavated 1,714,995 cubic yards of material 
in September. A new record for excavation 
in one day was made on the last day of the 
month, when the 52 shovels at work in the 
Central Division took out 63,418 cubic yards, 
an average of 1,220 cubic yards per shovel. 
The high record for the month was made 
by shovel 217, at work in the Culebra Dis- 
trict, which took out 52,892 cubic yards in 
25 days, an average of 2,116 cubic yards a 
day. The best record for a shovel in the 
70-ton class was made by shovel 102, which 
excavated 36,842 cubic j-ards of rock from 
the lock site at Gatun. Shovel 134 at work 
at the same place took out 35,560 cubic 
yards. Shovel 209, at work in the Central 
Division at Pedro Miguel, made the highest 
record for one day by excavating 3,100 cubic 
yards of soft rock on September 28. 

Monthly records are computed by place 
measurement, while the daily records are 
based on car measurement. The best 
records for the month and for one day in 
each section of the work are shown below: 
Best Records for the Monib. 

Central Division. 

T.^BERNILLA DISTRICT. 



Shovel 


Cubic Yards. 


No. of 
days at 
work. 


No. 


Earth. Rock. 


Total, 


114 .... 
253 .... 


21,282 11,971 
6,629 1 26.517 


33,252 
33,146 


25 
25 



GORGONA DISTRICT. 



256 

255 



I 



33,884 



13,840 



Not cls'fi'd Not cls'fi'd 



47,724 
31,781 



25 
25 



BAS OBISPO DISTRICT. 



211 .... 
116 .... 


4,099 
16,712 


36.889 40,988 
16,712 33,424 


25 
25 




EMPIRE DISTRICT. 




207 .... 
262 .... 


3.178 
1.722 


38,613 
32,716 


41,791 
34,438 


23 
24 




CULEBRA DISTRICT. 




217 .... 
259 


7,400 


45,492 
45,723 


52,892 
45,723 


25 
25 









PEDRO MIGUEL. 



209 

264 



3,166 
6,526 



36.412 
16,790 



39.578 
23,316 



24 
18 



OBISPO DIVERSION. 



126 



22,829 



22.829 



Atlantic Division. 

MINDI. 



133 5.173 

101 .... 5,586 



18.195 
3,158 



23,368 
8,744 



25 
20 





GATUN LOCKS. 






102 


36.842 


36,842 
35,560 


25 


134 .... 


6.219 -29,341 


25 



SPILLWAY— GATUN DAM. 



251 ... 
135 ... 



1.807 
6,792 



16,313 
7,483 



18,120 
14,275 



23 
23 



Pacific Division. 

MIk.AFLORES LOCKS. 



118 .... 


Notcls-fi'dNotcls-fi'd 


18,410 


i 


151 .... 


Not cls'fi'd Not cls'fi'd 


18.700 


15? .... 


7.021 12,549 


19.370 


23 


258 .... 


Not cls'fi'd Not cls'fi'd 


32,125 


24 



PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS. 



130 
222 
50 



10,610 
3,523 
1.745 




21 
19 
4 



Best Records f-»r One Day. 

CivNTRAL Division. 



I Character ma- 
terial. 



253 
115; 
2.S6, 
255' 
2111 
252: 
2191 
207 1 
259; 
266 
209 
257 



Taberiiilla Sept. 

Tabemilla Sept. 

.Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

.Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept 



Gorpona 

Gorj^ona 

Bas Obispo. .. 
lias Obispo... 

Knipire 

Empire 

Culebra 

Cnlebra 

Pedro Miguel . 
Pedro Miguel. 



Rock 

Rock and earth 
Rock and earth 

4i Earth 

29j Earth 

1 Earth 

Earth 

Rock and earth 
Rock and earth 

Earth 

Soft rock 

Soft rock 



2.220 
2.070 
2..550 
2.320 
2.360 
2.040 
2.480 
2.400 
2,670 
2.600 
3,100 
1,480 



Atlantic Division. 



131 Gatun Locks i Sept. ll Clay 

102| Gatun Locks I Sept. 21 Rock 

25r (iatnn spillway. I Sept. 19l Clay and rock.. 
U5\ Gatun spillway.! .Sept. 10' Clay and gravel 

i;«l Mindi 1 Sept. 17l Clay and rock.. 

101] Mindi ' Sept. 25| Clay and rock.. 



2.430 
2.344 
1,700 
1.640 
1.505 
791 



Pacific Division. 



1S3' 


Miraflore.s Locks 


Sept. 


26 


Not classified.. 


1.360 


2.iS 


Miraflores Locks'' 


Sept. 


11 


Not classified.. 


2.570 


no 


Pedro -Migviel ... 


.Sept. 


25 


Not classified.. 


830 


?^?. 


Pedro Miguel ... 


Sept. 


19 


Not classified.. 


1.2S0 


157 


Cardenas Hill... 


Sept. 


15 


Not classified.. 


1,170 



Note— Shovels in the one-hundred class are 75-ton 
Bucyrus and Model 60 Marions with dipper.'; of a 
capacity of 2V'2 cubic yards. Shovels in the two- 
hundred class are 95-ton Bucyrus and Model 91 
Marions with dippers of a capacity of 5 cubic yards. 
Shovels in the fifty-class are 45-ton shovels with 
dippers of a capacity of 1% cubic yards. These 
sliovels are under steam for eight hours per day. but 
are not actually worked during this entire period, 
time beinjr lost by the necessity of moving the 
shovel forward. blastin.cr stone too big for the shovel 
to handle, keeping the shovel supplied with cars, etc. 



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS. 

Changes in Department of Civil Adminis- 
tration. 

Culebra. C. Z.. September 17, 190S. 
Under authority of the Executive Order of the 
President of January 6, 190S, the Departmentof Reve- 
nues, in the Department of Ci^^l Administration of 
the Isthmian Canal Commission, shall hereafter be 
known as the Dii'isJonof Posts. Customs and Reve- 
nues of the Departmentof Civil Administration. 

The fire department shall hereafter be known as 
the Division of Fire Protection of the Department of 
CiWl Administration. 

The Department of Police and Prisons shall here- 
after be known as the Division of Police and Prisons 
of the Department of Civil Administration. 

The title of the head of the Division of Fire Pro- 
tection shall be Fire Chief. 
Effective September 1, 190S. 

Geo. W. Ooethals, 
Chaiffnan. 
Approved : 

T.,UKE E- Wright, 

Secretary of War. 



Assistant Subsistence Officer. 

Culebra, C. Z.. Octobers, 190S. 
Circular No. 216. 

First Lieutenant Frank O. Whitlock, Fourteenth 
Cavalry, having reported for duty, in accordance with 
S. O. No, 20S, current series from the War Depart- 
ment, is hereby appointed Assistant Subsistence Of- 
ficer, reporting to Major E. T. Wilson. Subsistence 
Officer. 

H. F Hodges, 
Aciins Chairman . 

Hconomy in Foundry Operation. 

CULEBRA. C. Z.. October S. 1908. 
Circular No. 215. 

Under present conditions of operating the foundry 
at Gorgona necessitating the use. in large p;irt, of 
new pig iron, it will be more economical hereafter to 
purchase in the United States grate bars and similar 
small castings, the need for which can be antici- 
pated. Requisitions should be prepared and for- 
warded to the Chief Quartermaster for from six 
months' to a year's supply of such castings as will 
be required. The foundry at Gorgona will tuni out 



only such of these castings as will be necessary to 
fill requirements until the receipt of castings on 
order. 

H. F. Hodges. 
Aciiiis Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Correspondence on Requisitions. 

Culebra. C. Z.. October 10. 
Circular No. 217: 

Whenever it becomes necessary for officials on the 
Isthmus to enter into corresoondence relative to 
requisitions covering purcliases in the United States 
such correspondence shall be conducted thro\igli the 
Chief Unnrtermaster. in order that proper records 
may be kept in his office, and the practice of cor- 
responding with the General Purchasing Officer or 
contractors direct is prohibited. The Chief Quarter- 
master will also be furnished copies of all communi- 
cations relating to purchases passing between the 
Chairman and the General Purchasing Officer direct. 

H. F. Hodges. 
Actitig Chairman . 



Transfers and Appointment of District 
Quartermasters, 

Culebra, C Z., October 6, 1908. 
To All Concerxed: 

The following transfers and appointment are an- 
nounced, effective October 10: 

J. B. Jeffries. District Quartermaster at Empire, to 
District Quartennaster at Culebra. 

C. P. Allen. District Quartermaster at Culebra, to 
District Quartermaster at Empire. 

J. A. Simmons is appointed Assistant District Quar- 
termaster at Culebra. 

C. A. Devol, 
Chief Quarterntaster. 



Auction of Public Animals. 

Office of the Chief Qu.'vrtermaster, 
Culebra, C. Z., October 7, 1908. 

Notice is hereby given that there will be sold at 
public auction at the Ancon corral, at 3 oclockp. m,, 
October 24, to the highest bidder, the following de- 
scribed public animals, which have been condemned 
and ordered sold : 

Dark brown American mare mule. No. 280. 

I,ight bay American gelding mule. No. 279 

Black American gelding mule. No. 24-0. 

Dark brown American mare mule. No. 321. 

Brown American mare mule. No. 281. 

I,ight brown American mare mule. No. 330. 

White native stallion. No. 93. 

Dun native stallion. No. 102. 

Black Chilean mare mule. No. 194. 

Mouse-color American mare mule. No. 164. 

Black native stallion. No. 46. 

Gray native stallion. No. 56. 

White native stallion. No. 79. 

Bay native gelding. No. 51. 

Two American colts, aged 5 months. 

There will be sold, under same conditions, at the 
Cristobal corral, on the same day and at the same 
hour, the following described public animals, which 
have been condemned and ordered sold : 

Ivight brown native geldini-^ mule, No. 138. 

Dark brown American gelding mule, No. 235. 

Dark bay native gelding mule, No. 2S. 

White native stallion. No. S3, 

Bay American gelding. No. 1. 

The animals may be seen at the corrals named, and 
full information may be obtained from the District 
Quartermaster*; at Ancon and Cristobal, respectively. 

C. A. Devol, 
Chief QuaJiermastrr. 



Misdirected Letters. 



Division of Dead Letters. 
Ancon. C. Z.. October 13, 190S. 
The following insufficiently addressed letters, origi- 
nating in the United States and its possessions, have 
been received in the office of the Director of Posts, 
and may be obtained on reauestof addressee: 



Bartley, J. J. 
Bork. F. A. 
Buckingham. Chas. 
Caldwell, John 
Cantor, Mrs. C. 
Chambers, John W. 
Colchester, C. C. 
Cornish. L. D. 
Curtis. A. S. 
Day, Ed 
Ellis. David E- 
Eppley. C. Dean 
Foster, W. F. 
Fritzche, P. A. 
Glass, Lulu V. 
Haggerty, John 
Haussler. Eniest 
Hurley, W, W. 



Kelly, M. J. 
Lugowski, Julius 
Lyons, Patric 
Muaning. Chas. S. 
Mayner, J. 
Metzger, Frederick 
Montague, Chas. H. 
Muller, Henry 
McLeod, John 
Peters, Carl 
Rogers, Ernest L. 
Sands. F. W. 
Smith, Chester K. 
Soulter, Alex 
Sniythe. Thos. A. 
Swain. B. E. 
Thompson, Wni. G. 
Wilson, Geo. Frank 



The following steamers have recently arrived at La 
Boca: October 5. A'ii;«t-j^5, from northern ports : Oc- 
tober 5, /«(fi(/vm, from San Francisco. Departures 
were : October 3, U. S. S. Buffalo, for San Francisco; 
October 5, T^icapel and San fuan, for Valparaiso; Oc- 
tober 7, Rameses. for southern ports. 



THE CANAL KliCORD 



PERFORMANCE OF STEAM SHOVELvS 



MUNTHIvY . RKCURDS iN THE ITLANTIC, CENTRAL, AMD PACIFIC DIVISIONS 
The subjoined tables show the monthly records of steam shovel work in Canal excavations since Anisrican occupation 



Verit>d 



ATLANTIC DIVISION 



COLON DISTRICT 



! it 



^ in 



c c 
v 

•2 S 

B a 



k >■ 



C, (ft 






O 



GATUN I^OCKS. 



1907— 

July 1 

Auj^nst 2 

Septembei , 2 

October . . . 
November . 
December. 

1908— 
January, . . 
February . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

Aujvust 

September 1 



13 
27 
24 



1 


27 


2 


24 


2 


25 


2 


26 


2 


24 


2 


26 


2 


25 




25 


i.s 


26 


1.54 


26 


.88 


26 



56 
283 
60! 
761 
833 
939 

1,218 
1,368 
1,574 
1,349 
1,087 

684 

587 

741 I 

713 I 



731 
7,629 
14,419 
20.539 
20,002 
23,473 

31.418 
32.816 
40.925 
33.718 
27.167 
17,790 
15,269 
18.532 
17.840 



11.12 
16.37 

8.03 
19.27 
14.27 

5.53 

3.18 

1.29 

2.81 

1.47 

17.,10 

13.33 

13.67 

15.88 

8.52 



O 5 

^§ 
O Z 



i' >■ 



p o 

o ^ 

X u 

■r. o 



Id 



1907— 

Augn.st I 3.70 27 784 

September i 4.12 , 24 884 

Octol)er I 5.00 , 27 \ 1.013 

November ' 5.00: 24, 1.014 

December 5.00 25 1,286 

1908— I 

Januar.v 5.72 26 1 1.302 

February [ 6.01 24, 1.222 

March 7.00 1 26! 1.206 

April I 7.00 25 I 1,288 

May ! 5.76 I 25 ! 1.156 

June 4.88 I 26 1 1.129 

July 3.77 26 ' 1.396 

AUKUSt 3.50 , 26 1.431 

September '' 3.44 , 25 1,218 



21.176 
21.219 
27,355 
24.327 
32,159 

33,840 
29,333 
31,366 
32,210 
28,891 
29,364 
36.291 

37.2:s 

30,459 



16.37 
8.03 
19.27 
14.27 
5.53 

3.18 
1.29 
2.81 
1.47 
17.30 
13.33 
13.67 
15.88 
8.52 



GATUN SPI1,I.W.\Y. 






5J> 



> « 

< 



1907— 

July 

Augu.st 

September.. 

October 

November.. 
December .. 

1908— 
January .. . . 
February . . 

March 

April 

Ma,v 

June 

July 

I August 

I September.. 



1.3,! 

2.00 ■ 

2.00 ■ 

;.00 : 

;.oo 
;.»o. 

i.OO 

5.75 

t.54 

>.00 

1.42 

i.50 

i.OO i 

!.S5 

;.08 I 



26 


423 


27 


498 


24 


757 


27 


745 


24 


854 


25 


1,395 


26 


1,264 


24 


1,183 


26 


1,311 


25 


1,184 


25 


908 • 


26 


1,117 


26 


981 


26 


783 


25 


792 i 



10,998 
13,433 
18,158 
20,118 
20,494 
34,878 

32,863 
28,402 
34,149 
29,598 
22,701 
29,045 
25,514 
20,351 
19,812 



11.12 
16.37 

8.03 
19.27 
14.27 

5.53 

3.18 
1.29 
2.81 
1.47 
17.30 
13.,'!3 
13.67 
15.88 
8.52 



1906— 
January.. . 
February . 

March 

.\prii 

May. 



June 

July 

.\ugT:st 

September.. 

October 

November . . 
December .. 
1907— 

January 

February..., 

March 

April 



CENTRAL DIVISION 



CUI.EBRA SECTION 



Period 



fcif 



r^ 



Output per shovel 
(cubic yards). 



May. 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1908— 

January 

February j 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July Cold Chagres Division included).. 
August do do 
September do do 



12.83 
12.48 
12.37 
12.33 
12.41 
14.81 
16.64 
16.93 
21.33 
22.67 
20.46 
22.6.S 

31.04 
39.87 
43.88 
44.12 
31.70 
38.28 
43.38 
39.70 
38.50 
37.63 
41.88 
42.72 

43.42 
43.67 
42.19 
41.28 
41.56 
42.92 
52.57 
52.58 
49.68 



36 
23 
27 
24 
27 
26 
25 
27 
24 
27 
24 
25 

26 
li 
25 
26 
26 
25 
26 
27 
24 
27 
24 
25 

26 
24 
26 
25 
23 
26 
26 
26 
25 



Rainfall 
(inches) . 



i = S 






CHAGRES SECTION 



-2 O 



t: 2 

< 



I bt 



o ^ 
S 2 



363 
587 
716 
720 
581 
539 
378 
536 
568 
532 
459 
491 



9.430 
13.494 
19.335 
17.289 
15.684 
14.026 

9.441 
14.461 
13.66-1 
14,373 
10,833 
12,267 



702 


18.24S 


674 


15.966 


741 


18.530 


765 


19.884 


833 


21.674 


651 


16,266 


680 


17.670 


729 


19,680 


811 


19,468 


813 


21,963 


784 


18,818 


965 


24,113 


1,084 


28,177 


1,186 


28,475 


1,171 


30,451 


1,202 


30.031 


918 


22,948 


1,011 


26,281 


1,071 


27,848 


1.122 


29,184 


1.178 


29,443 



1.28 
0.57 
0.45 

11.42 
7.54 
6.92 

14.6i 

11.84 
7.41 
3.97 

21.05 
8.15 

0.08 
0.13 
0.16 
0.09 
6.22 
13.53 
9.85 
11.28 
10.86 
15.44 
10.40 
1.47 

0.75 
0.00 
0.41 
1.36 

12.91 
8.21 

11.79 
8.11 
9.76 



1.19 

11.64 ! 

1.34 

SM 

7.25 

8.94 123 

20.26 127 

12.97 132 

6.22 130 

8.46 12K 

19.19 120 

9.09 lOS 



1907— 
August .... 
September . 

October 

November.. 
December.. 

190S— 
Jan uary .... 
Febniary., . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

"July 



(U o 



Qtr. :S 



o 



i I 



0.00 
0.49 
0.08 
0.04 
7.45 
14.74 
9.42 
11.81 
11.38 
15.27 
6.91 
2.30 

0.91 
0.01 
0.13 
1.67 

12.63 
S.76 

13.23 
7.74 

13.74 



104 
108 
105 
11(1 
118 
US 
118 
120 
123 
123 
123 
124 

125 
124 
125 
127 
129 
126 
121 



0.15 


37 


716 


19,333 


12.20 


0.92 


24 


976 


23,420 


14.71 


2.22 1 


27 


428 


11,544 


13.62 


3.00 


24 


612 


14,681 


9.85 


6.12 


25 


630 


15,756 


2.26 


8.11 


26 


-97 


20,720 


0.20 


10.33 


24 


798 


19,144 


0.11 


11.47 


26 


1,082 


28,094 


0.41 


11.76 ■ 


25 


1.121 


28,018 


1.81 


11.68 ; 


25 


808 


20,197 


13.18 


12.23 i 


26 


1.013 


26.341 


6.55 



♦After July 1. 1908. the old ChayresandCulebra divi- 
sions were consolidated in the Central Divisioii. No 
separate record forstenni shovels in the old divisions 
has been kept since that date. Figures for July and 
August under "Culebra Section" include work done 
in the whole Central Division. 



Summary for the month of September. 1908: 
Averajije number of shovels at work. 63.59. 
Average output per shovel per day. SS5 cubic \'ards. 
Average output per shovt-l per month, 22,134. 
The working day for steam shovels is eight hours. 



PACIFIC DIVISION 



PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS | 


MIRAFLORES LOCKS 


. DAJIS AND SPILLWAY 

bt „ . 1 _ _. 1 




LA BOCA DISTRICT 










M 




— 






IM 




^^ , 


„ . 








































b !4 


1* 


85 


1^ 


f, 




s^ 


'•F-s 






^ 1 

8 


1 


^ c 


'^.e 




s = 




Period. 


ir. 

2° 


o :: 

is 


■r. u 

T3 


■o 


1 

a 


Period 


erage numl 
levels at w 


1! 

•Si 


tput per s 
cu. yds.) pe 


.1 

w u 




1 Period- 

i 




= 

o ^ 


1?; 


Is 


JZ 
u 

i 








s-^ 


3^^ 


C5 




s « 






3-^ 


(5 










S-' 






1! 


Z 








« 




< 


z 


o 


o 


as 




< 


z 


« 


o 


3! 


1908- 












1908— 












1908— 














50 


'6 


600 


19,134 
16,282 
21,203 
15,204 


4 98 




3 50 


26 


746 


19,418 
20,502 
12,174 
18,077 
24.179 
24,612 
23,440 


0.00 




.1 1 00 


26 


476 


12,360 


0.00 


July 


1.00 
1.00 
1.84 


26 
26 
25 


626 
816 
608 


9.53 
9.31 
7.56 




4.50 
5.75 
3.80 
3.80 
3.70 
3.78 


25 
25 
26 
26 
26 
25 


820 
487 
695 
930 
947 
938 


0.76 
8.65 
4.98 
5.66 
9.31 
7.56 


April 

May 


. 1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
0.92 

. , 0.97 


25 
25 
26 
26 
26 
25 


452 
688 
562 
623 
739 
750 


11,300 
17,200 
14,630 
16,200 
19,214 
18,743 


0.76 






8.65 


September 




4.97 




July 

August 

September — 


5.66 






10.4S 




September 


5.93 



56 



THE CANAL RECORD 



COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT. 

SUPPLT OF OYSTERS. 

The stea.ms\\ip A diujiii-e, which sailed from 
New York on October 7, due at Cristobal 
October 14, has the first consignment of fresh 
oysters for the Commissary Department. 
They will be selected oysters, and are put up 
in one-half gallon kits. The department 
expects to keep oy.sters on sale re.gularly 
until the oyster season closes. 

COMMISSARY PRICES 

For week be^iniiinff October 13: 

FRE.SH MEATS. 

PHcr. 

Mutton— Stf^vinff Per 111 « 

Shoulder nnd neck (not under 

6 nouud.sl per lb 7 

Entire foreouarter (not under 

in nounds) per lb S 

I,eE (.S tn in poundsl per lb 16 

Short-cut chops -per lb 2fl 

Mmb— StewHnir per lb fi 

Entir*^ forequnrler .....per lb fi 

Lejr (fi to S pounds) ■: per lb 27 

Veal— Sfewiuff per lb 10 

En'ire forequarter (1.1 to 20 Ibsl... .per lb 11 

T.oin Perlb 22 

Shnrt-cut chops per lb 23 

Cutlets per lb ?3 

pork- Cuts per lb 20 

Beef— Suet rerlb 4 

Sonn pcrlb 8 

.mew tier lb 12 

Corned Per lb., 12. 14. 16 

Pot roast (from sirloin butt) per lb 17 

Rib-roiiSt. second cut vnot under 3 

pounds) per lb 19 

Rib-roast, short cut (not under 3'/2 

pounds) per lb 23 

Sirloin roast per lb 29 

Rump roast per lb 29 

Porterhouse roast per lb 29 

Steak, round per lb 23 

Rib per lb 24 

Sirloin per lb 29 

Porterhouse per lb 29 

Rump per lb 29 

Tenderloin per lb 30 

MISCE1,I.ANE0US. 

Livers— Calf each 65 

Sausage— Pork per lb 19 

Frankfurter oer lb 17 

Leberwurst peril) 17 

Bologna per lb 17 

Sweet bread— Veal each 1.20 

Ox tongues e.ach 90 

Pigs' feet, pickled per lb 14 

Pigs' tongues, pickled per lb 15 

Eggs, fresh dozen 34 

POULTRY AND G.\ME, 

Chickens— Dressed (milk-fed) each 1.30 

I>rge c milk-fed) each 1.50 

Ciipons each 2.40 

Broilers each 60 

Fowls, medium and large each, SOc. and l.oo 

Ducks, fatted (fancy) each 1.10 

Turke.vs per lb .30 

Squabs each 45 

Stickling pigs (whole! each 3.50 

Sucklingpigs (one-half) each 1.75 

CURED AND PICKLED MEATS. 

Bacon— Strips per lb 23 

English, breakfast sliced per lb §26 

Ham— Sugar-cured, sliced per lb §25 

One-half, for boiling ..per lb §21 

Ferris per lb 20 

Beef, salt, family per lb 16 

D.\1RY PRODUCTS, 

Butter — Prints, prime quality per lb 35 

Cheese — Neufchatel each 6 

Young America pel lb 22 

Swiss per lb 33 

Edam...... each l.OS 

Camembert per lb 28 

McLaren's jar 15 

Pinxter s tin 22 

French cheese in tins — Camembert, Roque- 
fort, Brie, Neufchatel tin 20 

Milk, Briarcliff quart 25 

VEGETABLES AND FRUITS. 

Tomatoes (local only) per lb ,S 

White potatoes per lb 314 

Sweet potatoes per lb 2Vj 



Cabbage per lb 

Onions per lb 

Beets per lb 

Carrots per lb 

Turaips ; per lb 

Onions t,Spauish) per lb 

Lima Beans per lb 

Lemons dozen 

Oninges dozen 

Apples per lb 

C.Miteloupes each 

(irapes. California, Tokay and M,alaga....per !b 



MOATEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS. 



3'/r 



S 
24 
IS 
5 
S 



§ Sold only frotn cold-storage and not from Com- 
mis.s.aries. 

NEW .\RTICLES, 

Price. 

Chocolate. Fr>'s Caracas, T4-lb cakes cake 10 

Hats, .straw, E. P. 2095 each $1.90 

Half hose— Black lisle pair, 30 and 35 

Black .silk pair 50 

Colored cotton pair 20 

Fancy lisle pair, 60 and 65 



Rainfall, October I to 10, laoS, Inclui^ive. 

(MIONIOHT to MIDNIOHT.) 

Maximum 
Stations. 



Atlantic Division — 

Cristobal 

Brazos Brook 

Gatuu 

Bohio 

Central Division — 

Tabeniilla 

S;in Pablo 

Has Obispo 

Gamboa 

Empire 

Cam.'icho 

Culebra 

Rio Grande 

Pacific Division — 

Pedro Miguel 

La Boca 

.\ncon 

IJpiH^r Chasres. 
Alliajuela 



one day 

2.35 
2.09 
2.13 
1.75 



Total. 



4.S5 
5,S9 
4.31 

4.94 



1.62 
1.12 
1.29 

.\boUshed. 
1.40 
.55 
1.56 
1.32 

1.70 
.70 
.82 



4.91 
3.32 
3.38 

3.59 
1.72 
3.58 
2.91 

3.30 
1.95 
1.61 

3.15 



Stages of the Chagres. 

Maximum height of Chagres above low 
water for the week ending midnight, Oc- 
tober 10, 1908 : 



Height of low water 

above mean sea 

level, feet 

Maxinunn height ab. 
low water, feet; 

.Sunday, Oct. 4 

.Monday, Oct. 5 

Tuesdjiy, Oct. 6 

Wedn'sday, Oct. 7.. 

Thursday. Oct. 8.... 

Friday, Oct. 9 

Saturday, Oct. 10... 
Maximum for week.. 



2.70 
1.60 
1.20 
2,00 

10.60 
8.00 
1.90 

1060 



2.35 
2.08 
1 80 
1-79 
8.06 
7.69 
2.38 
■'.•'6 



4.30 
4.00 
2.80 
2.65 
9.80 
11.40 
4.20 
I 11 40 



8.15 I 

8,30 

6.54 

5.64 

6.40 

13.90 
91! 

13.90 



3.35 
3.10 
2.50 
1.90 
3 30 
5.f0 
4.70 
5.6D 



Concert by the I. C. C. Band. 



PARAISO, C. Z.. 
Sunday, October l.S, 190.S, at 2.30 p. in,: 

TKOGKAM. 

1 March— Society Swing Frantzen 

2 Selection — Mills Mei-ry Melodies Mills 

3 Waltz— Co/rffw H'eddins St. Clair 

. 'd Intermezzo — Riiralistic Bagley 

lb Tone Poem — Lilacs Roberts 

5 March— //aMv Da-i's Levi 

6 Selection— r/;f /^t'rf Mill Herbert 

[a Excerpts from the Merty IVidow Lehar 

7 * Schottischc— »'*£•« a Boy Says " H'i/l 

I yoiif Allen 

S Overture — Lustslxil Kelar Bela 

9 Descriptive— .-f Hunlins Scene Bucalossi 

10 March— 7"A<f.Vra' Colonial Hall 

Chas. E. Jennings, Mnsical Director. 
A concert will be given at Culebra, C. Z., Sunday. 
October 25. 

Empire defeated Gorgona at bowling on the Em- 
pire allejs Saturday night in three straight games. 
Score; Empire, 776, 792, 867; Gorgona. 681, 718, 825. 



The following is a list of the sailings of the Pan- 
;iina Railroad Steamship Company, of the Royal 
.Mail Steam Packet Company, of the Hamburg- 
.\inerican Line, and of the Ignited rruit Company's 
Lino, the Panama Railroad Coin;..iny's dates being 
subject to change; 



FROM NEW ' 

p. 



■ORK 
R. R 
M.... 
R. R 
R. R 

-A 

R. R 

M 

R. R 
R. R. 

-A 

R. R 
■M.... 



AUianca 

Trent 

Colon 

Esperanza 

Prinz Joachim 

Finance 

Tagus 

Advance 

Allianca ~. . 

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm, 

Colon 

MagJalena R. 

Panama P. 

Prinz Joachi.a H 

Finance P. 

Orinoco R. 

Advance P. 

AUianca P. 

Piltiz Aug. Wilhelm... H 

Colon P. 

Atrato R. 

All the steamers of the Hamburg-American and 
Royal Mail lines call at ICingston enroute to Colon. 



R. R 
-A.... 
R. R 

M 



R. R 
R. R. 

-A.... 
R. R 

M 



TO COLON. 

Tuesday Oct. 

Saturday Oct. 

Saturday Oct. 

Thursday Oct. 

..Saturday Oct. 

.Tuesday Oct. 

.Saturday Oct. 

.Monday Nov. 

.Saturday . . . .Nov. 
.Saturday Nov. 

Thursday .. ..Nov. 

.Saturday Nov. 

.Tuesday ....Nov. 

Saturday Nov. 

Monday Nov. 

Saturday Nov. 

.Saturday Nov. 

.Thursday Dec. 

.Saturday Dec. 

Tuesday Dec, 

Saturday Dec. 



13 

17 

17 

22 

24 

27 

31 

2 

7 

7 

12 

14 

17 

2! 

23 

23 

28 

3 

5 



FROM COLON TO NEW YORK. 



Esperanza P. 

Prinz Joachim H. 

Advauce P. 

T.agus R.- 

Allianca P. 

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm. ..H. 

Colon P. 

Magdalena R, 

Esperanza P. 

Finance P. 

Prinz Joachim H. 

Advance P. 

Orinoco R.- 

Allianca P. 

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm. ..H. 

Colon ' P. 

Panama P. 

Atrato R. 

Finance P 

Prinz Joachim H, 

Advance P. 

Trent R. 



Oct. 
Oct. 
.Oct. 
Nov. 

Nov. 



R. R.Tuesday Oct. 

-A Tuesday Oct. 

R. R.Monday Oct. 

•M Tuesday Oct 

R. R. -Saturday 
-A Tuesday 

R. R.Thursday 
-M:.. ..Tuesday 

R. R.Tuesday . 

R. R.Monday Nov, 

,-A Tuesday Nov. 

R. R.Sunday Nov, 

M Tuesday r^ov. 

R. R.Friday Nov. 

■A Tuesday Nov. 

R. R.Wednesday ..Nov, 

R. R.IMonday Nov, 

-M Tuesday Dec. 

. R. R.Sunday Dec 

.-.A Tuesday Dec. 

, R. R.Friday Dec 

-M Tuesday Dec. 



FROM NEW ORLEANS TO COLON 

Heredia 

Cartago 

Parismina 

Heredijx 

Cartago 

Parismina 

Heredia 

FROM COLON TO NEW ORLEANS, 

U.F.C.. Tuesday ... 

,_ U.F.C.. Tuesday ... 

U.F.C.. Tuesday ... 



Parismina — 

Heredia 

Cartago 

Parismina — 

Heredia 

Cartago 

Parismina, . . 



..U.F.C.. Saturday Oct. 

..U.F.C... Saturday Oct. 

..U.F.C... Saturday Oct. 

..U.F.C. .Saturday Nov. 

, ..U.F.C. .Saturday Nov. 

..U.F.C. .Saturday Nov. 

..U.F.C. ..Saturday Nov. 



Oct. 
Oct. 

.Nov. 
Nov. 
■ Nov. 
Nov. 
Dec. 



.U.F.C. .Tuesday 
..U.F.C. .Tuesday 
..U.F.C. .Tuesday . 
.U.F.C. .Tuesday 



13 

13 

19 

20 

24 

27 

2? 

3 

3 

9 

10 

15 

17 

20 

24 

25 

30 

1 

6 
8 
11 
IS 



17 

24 

31 

7 

14 
21 
28 

20 
27 

3 
10 
17 
24 

1 



FROM COLON TO BARBADOS, CALLING AT TRINIDAD. 

Trent R.-M Tuesday Oct. 27 

Tagus R.-M Tuesday Nov. 10 

Magdalena R.-M Tuesday Nov. 24 

Orinoco R.-M Tuesday Dec. S 

Atrato R.-M Tuesday Dec. 22 

Trent "R.-M Tuesday Jan. 5 

FROM COLON TO NEW ORLEANS VIA KINGSTON. 

Median Leyland Line about. .Oct. 20 

Mexican Leyland Line about. .Oct. 31 

The Panama railroad steamships Siiil at 3 p. m 
from dock at Cristobal direct to New York. 

The Prinz steamers of the Hamburg-American line 
sail from Colon at 1 p. m. via Kingston, Jamaica, 
for New York. 

All Ro.val Mailsteamers men tiouedabove leave early 
in the morning from Colon \na Kingston, Jamaica, 
for New York. All mail and passengers should be 
on board earl.v on day of sailing. 

The steamers of the United Fruit Company's line 
sail from New Orleans at 10 a. m. for Colon, calling 
at Puerto Barrios, and from Colon at 1.30 p.m., via 
Port Linion aud Puerto Barrios, for New Orleans. 

Sailings of the French line (Cie. G^n^nile Trans- 
atlantique) for Venezuelan ports, Martinique and 
Guadeloupe on the 3d and 2flth of each month. 



CANAL 




RECORD 



Volume II. 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1908. 



No. 8. 



The Canal Record 

Published weekly under the authority end supervision of the 
ISTHMIAN ^ANAL COMMISSION 

"The Canal Record"' is issued J ree of charge, one 
copy each, to all employes of the Comviissioit a?id Pan- 
ama Railroad Company whose najnes are on the "sold'^ 
roll. Extra copies can be obtained from the news 
stands ef the Panama Railroad Com Pany for Jive cents 
each 

Address all Communlcatioas 

THE CANAL RECORD 

Ancon, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama, 

No communication, either J or publication or rcQ nest- 
ing injorniation, will receive attention unless signed 
with the Jull name and address oj the writer. 

NOTES OF PROGRESS. 

Chairman's Monthly Report, 

The report of the Acting Chairman of the 
Isthmian Canal Commission for September 
is published in other columns of this issue 
of The Canal Record. The work of re- 
organization was continued, and, eflfective 
September 1, the Division of Material and 
Supplies was merged with the Quartermas- 
ter's Department. A summary of the con- 
struction work done by three construction 
divisions shows that the material excavated 
in September amounted to 3,237.751 cubic 
yards, of which 1,789,348 were taken out by 
steam shovels, 1,437,885 by dredges, and 
10,518 cubic yards by hand excavation. Of 
the 3,237,751 cubic yards 3,089,851 were re- 
moved from the Canal prism; 1,707,947 by 
steam shovels; 1.374,856 by dredges, and 
7,048 by hand. The remaining 146,900 cu- 
bic \ards were from accessory works. Rock 
drilling to the amount of 348,609.2 feet was 
done, 11.6 miles of old track were removed, 
and 7.18 miles of new track were laid, and 
379.72 tons of explosives were used. The 
averaged nunilier of laborers employed daily 
was 13,040. The rainfall in the Atlantic Di- 
vision was 11.57 inches, in the Central Di- 
vision, 9.75, and in the Pacific Division, 7.56 
inches. 

In the Atlantic Division there were re- 
moved from the site of the Gatun Locks and 
from the site of the spillway 153,194 cubic 
yards; by the dredges in Limon Bay, 624,776 
cubic yards, all from the Canal prism; b\- 
the dredge at the site of the dock for the 
handling plant 48,974 cubic yards, and by 
steam shovels at Mindi 32,112 cubic yards. 
At Gatun Dam 42,857 cubic >ards of Bas 
Obispo rock and 4,096 cubic yards of mate- 
rial from the spillway were dumped on the 
south toe of tlie dam, and 57,374 cubic yards 
from the spillway aud Mindi were dumped 



on the north toe. During the month 1,288 
linear feet of trestle were constructed. 

The excavation in the Central Division 
amounted to 1,476,323 cubic yards, of which 
421,139 cubic yards were e.:irth and 1,055,184 
were rock. In the same territory in Sep- 
tember, 1907, 773,095 cubic yards were re- 
moved. In September, 1907, however, the 
average number of steam shovels at work 
durin.g the month was 39.91, while in Sep- 
tember, 1908, the average number at work 
was 49.68. The rainfall in September, 1907, 
was 10.61, and in 1908, 9.75. The output 
per shovel per day in September, 1907. was 
807 cubic 3'ards, while in September, 1908, it 
was 1,180 cubic yards, an increase of 46 per 
cent. 

In the Pacific Division, on the lock site at 
Pedro Mi.guel 28,833 cubic yards of material 
were excavated, and from the lock site at 
Miraflores 89.105 cubic yards. The excava- 
tion from the site of the Miraflores Dam 
amounted to 1,817 cubic yards, and from the 
prism at Cardenas Hill, 18,181 cubic yards. 
The dredging at La Boca amounted to 750,- 
080 cubic yards, all from the Canal prism. 

On the relocation of the Panama railroad 
2,831 linear feet of permanent track were 
laid, makin.g a total of 43.576 feet. The 
force of laborers during the month averaged 
989. 

In the Subsistence Department the net 
profit in September for the operation of ho- 
tels and mess halls, not including the Tivoli 
hotel, was §9,535.20. The net loss on the 
Tivoli hotel was :S2,002.33, making a net profit 
for the Department of §7,532.87. 

The Division of Public Works of the De- 
partment of Civil Administration reported 
that during the month 30,052,000 gallons of 
water were used in the city of Panama, and 
26,631,923 in the city of Colon. The health 
conditions continued to be satisfactory dur- 
ing September. 

Mindi Mag^^zine. 

The storage magazine for explosives at 
Mindi has been completed and the work of 
storing dynamite there has begun. The 
railroad from the main line of the Panama 
railroad to the magazine is being straight- 
ened and the old French tracks which were 
originally laid have been replaced b_v 70- 
pound steel rails. 

The magazine is located one and one-half 
miles southeast of the Mindi spur, and is so 
surrounded by hills that an explosion would 
not seriously affect the nearby villages of 
Cristobal, Colon, Mount Hope, and Gatun. 
It is built into the hillside in such manner 
that at the back and sides it is surrounded In- 
earth. Hollow concrete blocks 12 inches 
thick and bullet proof have been used for 
the walls, and the roof is composed of con- 
crete reinforced with old Belgian rails and 
waterJ)roofed. The magazine is 112 feet 
long, 48 feet wide, and 9 feet high inside. 



The concrete roof keeps the interior dr\- and 
cool. Ventilation has been provided by air 
flues which open under the roof. Six hun- 
dred thousand pounds of dynamite can be 
stored in this building. Near the magazine, 
and yet so faraway that an explosion in one 
would not affect the other is a detonator 
house. It is 33 feet 6 inches long, 17 feet 3 
inches wide, and 10 feet high inside. It 
also is built of concrete blocks and has a 
ceiling of reinforced concrete with a corru- 
gated iron roof above it. 

In the magazine reservation is a frame 
hou.=e for a watchman who will have charge 
of the* station. A neutral zone, in which no 
shooting will be allowed, will probably be 
established. 

Unloading Dynamite. 

The first shipment of dynamite under the 
contract for the fiscal year 1909 arrived at 
Cristobal on October 10, and was unloaded 
at Dock 14. It consisted of 1,000,000 pounds 
in 20,000 boxes of 50 pounds to a box. Everj- 
box was taken from the hold of the ship 
Sylvia by hand and sent down a skid to the 
wharf. Such care was taken in handling 
the explosives that only one of the 20,000 
boxes was broken open. 



Dredging at Pacific Hntrance. 

Dredge Xo. 14, one of the old French lad- 
der dredges, struck rock in the channel of 
the Canal at La Boca on the night of Octo- 
ber 6. Before the dredgers realized the un- 
expected nature of the material they were 
handling, the end of the bucket ladder had 
Vieen broken and the tumbler wheel lost. 
The disabled dredge was taken to the 
docks, where a new ladder was put in, and 
work in the channel was resumed just one 
week after the accident. Prompt repair 
and quick return to work were possible, be- 
cause a ladder taken from one of the two 
old dredges at Gorgona was on the ground 
ready for such an emergenc}'. The U.dder 
of the second dredge at Gorgona is being 
taken down and will be brought to La Boca 
to be held in readiness as a "spare." 

The Pacific dredging fleet has been con- 
siderably strengthened by the addition of 
the old French ladder dredge A-2, now 
known as the Mote, which was put back in 
commission a few days ago. The fleet now 
consists of three old French ladder dredges, 
one of them a sea-going dredge, one sea- 
going suction dredge, one 20-inch suction 
dredge, and a dipper dredge. It was hoped 
that this fleet would bring the monthl}- ex- 
cavation for the Pacific dredges from its 
present point (about 750,000 cubic yards), 
up to a million cubic yards or over. This 
may be accomplished ultiuiateh-, but if pres- 
ent conditions continue and the dredges at 
La Boca are obliged to keep on scraping 
mud off the stratum of rock that underlies 
the channel of the old F'rencli canal, it is 



58 



THE CANAL RECORD 



NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



{.Continued). 



not likely that a new record will be made 
for some time to come. 

The sea-going ladder dredge Gopher is 
working its waj- up the channel, making a 
cut 26 feet deep at mean tide. The cut 
will be continued toCorozal, thus giving ac- 
cess at low water to the Miraflores lock site. 
The sea-going suction dredge A neon is 
dredging from the end of the La Boca wharf 
out to deep water, making a cut from — 26 
to —45. 

Requisition has been made for four addi- 
tional dump barges for use with the Pacific 
dredges. They will be of steel, 400 cubic 
yards capaeitx', and will be erected at the L/a 
Boca marine shops. 

I^anda for Canal Purposes 

The cases arising from the expropriation 
of Canal Zone property for Canal purposes 
have been settled in accordance with the de- 
cision of the Joint Commission published in 
The C.Kti.Ki^ Record of August 12, 1908. 
Deeds to«the United States have been exe- 
cuted covering the lands in question. For- 
mal possession of the hacienda Andrade at 
Gorgona was taken on October 17. 



total number of employes, 100; number in- 
jured through their own fault, 12; number 
injured through the fault of co-employes, 2; 
number injured through burns, 13; number 
injured through bruises, 1. No deaths re- 
sulted from injuries sustained in the foundrv. 



Accidents at Gorg^ona Fonndry. 

The American Foundrymen's .Association 
has reported the following accident statistics 
for Gorgona foundry during the year ended 
June 30. 1908 : Total accidents 14; average 



New Unloading: Station for Oil Steara-'rs. 
.\n iron pontoon, IS feet square, used by 
the French as a diving bell in building the 
foundations of the La Boca wharf, has been 
.sunk 1,400 feet south of the wharf at La 
Boca, as an anchor for the end of the Union 
Oil Company's pipe line. The company's 
ships will unload their oil at this pontoon, 
whence it will be piped to the pumping sta- 
tion for delivery at various points along the 
Canal. At present the unloading intake of 
the Union Oil Company projects into the 
channel and is in the way of the dredging 
operations. 

New School Building at Corozal. 

A school building for white children has 
been authorized for Corozal. It will bebuilt 
by contract. The plans call for a building 53 
feet by 66 feet over all, divided into two 
rooms each 35 by 37 feet; the ceiling to be 
13 feet above the floor. Separate toilets 
for boys and girls will be built at opposite 
ends of the building. The construction will 
be of the Commission style, with a veranda 
running around the buikling. 

High Water In Limon Bay. 

After the heavy storm that swept the Car- 
ibbean sea last week the water in Limon 



LABOR FORCE AND QUARTERS. 



There were 346 additions to the Canal 
force and 392 separations in the month of 
September, a net decrease of 46. Of the sep- 
arations 158 voluntarilv left the service, 146 



were discharged, 78 resigned, 2 were changed 
to a .silver basis, 4 died, and 2 resigned. A 
statement of the force actually at work on 
September 30 follows: 





d 
g 

XI 


O 


Silver Men. 


Total 


Dep.\rtment. 


Mon- 
thly. 


Artisans. 


European 
I,aborers. 


We.<it Ind'n 
Laborers. 


Total 
Silver. 


Gold 
and 




32c. & 
over. 


26c. 


40c. 


32c. 


26c. 


20c. 


Silver 
Men. 




3,137 
.W3 
387 
72 
287 
89 
53 


1.S68 

1.113 

665 

787 

140 

15 

1 


4,341 

375 

SO 

2 

25 


1,100 
9 


4.503 
362 


347 
30 


1.173 

S3 

7 


2.923 
921 
259 


16.255 


19,392 
















789 

165 

13 

1 


861 


























104 
54 


Examiner of Accounts 




























Totals 


4.328 


4.589 


4.823 


1.109 


4,865 


377 


1,263 


4.103 


21,129 


25.457 



STATEMENT OF CLASSIFIED EXPENDITURES TO AUGUST 31, 1908. 

The following table shows expenditures for Canal work, classified monthly, since July 
1, 1907. The figures give only expenditures which have been located. In addition, there 
have been some disbursements, such as purchasing material, etc., which it will not be 
possible to locate to a specified account until their use has been finally determined : 



Prior to July 1. 1907 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1908— 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

Tune 

July 

August 

Total 



Civil Admin- 
istration. 



Sanitation. 



11,446.287.74 

51,183.84 
67.548.53 
63,239.62 
53.227.97 
54.529.02 
64.903.04 



66.802.92 
72.514.14 
63,653.60 
74,046.55 
73.340.26 
379.34 
84.898.15 
77.019.80 



$4,626,716.39 

149.270.94 
214,018.03 
253,108.77 
189,196.38 
166,381.82 
213,725.16 



221.866.30 
174.076.77 
165.311.77 
178.041.65 
184.381.35 
200.833.07 
197.963.07 
145,870.37 



Construction] Municipal 
and I Improve- 

Engitieering. nients. 



1 



$13,445,607.23 I $4,282,865.16 



962.477.19 
1,196.803.45 
1.194.304.85 
1.372.311.81 
1.217.120.31 
1.369,822.79 



1.46.S.021.44 
1,523,011.72 
1.460.229.91 
1.5S0.416.19 
1,.5S0,369.11 
1,755.771.69 
1,452,698.88 
1.599,556.90 



146,131.93 
192,227.75 
107.840.85 
123,939.88 
115,625.44 
125.420.96 



156,956.22 

100.700.40 

110.232.15 

138.115.21 

69,824.83 

107.940.79 

91,901.17 

60,798.76 



Plant Ac- 
count. 



$19,483,757.66 

580,562.68 

767.153.24 

1.068.300.58 

1,131.450.91 

1,105,590.16 

591,298.02 



Total. 



,584,821.98 
889,405.82 
.307,321.82 
797.137.63 
955.405.12 
905.767.19 
.544,0S3.23 
517.046.09 



$43,285,234.18 

1.889.626.58 
2,437,751.00 
2.686.794.67 
2.870.126.95 
2.659,246.75 
2.365.169.97 



3.498.468.86 
2,759.708.f5 
3.106.749.25 
2.767.757.23 
2.863.320.67 
2.969,933.40 
2,371,544.50 
2.400,291.92 



Bay was very high. Thursday and Fridaj 
the waves were breaking on the beach 
road at Cristobal and Colon, notwithstand- 
ing that a stiff breeze was blowing from the 
south. .\t one place it was necessary for the 
Panama Railroad Company to dump two 
car loads of rock in order to keep its water- 
front intact. 



Family Quarters. 

When the family quarters authorized up to 
October 8 have been constructed, there will 
still be on the list of applicants 361 people 
eligible for quarters. Of these, 73 are on 
the 1907 list, and entitled to prior consider- 
ation. A statement of thecoiiditions in each 
village follows : 



Villages. 


Application on file 
as of September 
1. 1908. 


.\ccommoda - 
tions avail 
able on com- 
p 1 e t ion of 
work a u- 




1907. 


1903. 


Total 


thorized to 
Oct. 8. 1908. 


Aticon 


16 
3 
2 

8^ 
1 
36 
21 
23 
3 
11 
1 
7 


17 

""3 
10 
60 
11 
33 
40 

g 
9 


33 

3 

5 

14 

146 

12 

69 

61 

76 

26 

25 

7 

16 


13 


Aiicon Hospital 


2 


Corozal 

Cristobal 


13 
16 


Ciilebm 




Empire 


24 




22 


Iva Boca 


Las Cascadas 




Paraiso 




Pedro Miguel 

Porto Bello 


S 
18 


San Pablo 


2 
I 


8 
1 


10 
2 












Total 


217 


288 


505 


144 



University Club Election. 

At the annual meeting of the University 
Club, held on October 18, the following 
officers were elected : President, Arnold 
Shanklin; first vice-president, J. G. Hol- 
combe; second vice-president, Ernesto Le- 
fevre; treasurer, E. C. McFarland; secre- 
tary, J. E. Marsh; asssistant secretary, R. G. 
Castel. Governors: Joseph Bucklin Bishop, 
Hiram J. Slifer, Malcolm Elliott, M. B. de 
Putron, A. S. Cooper, J. C. Perry, H. G. 
Prescott. Honorary president, Hon. Josd 
Domingo de Obaldia; honorary vice-presi- 
dent, Hon. Charles E. Magoon; honorary 
vice-president, Col. W. C. Gorgas. 



Cornerstone Laying at Empire. 

The cornerstone of the new Episcopal St. 
Mary's Church, Empire, will be laid next 
Sunday afternoon, October 25, at 3 o'clock, 
by Lieut. -Col. H. F. Hodges, Acting Chair- 
man and Chief Engineer of the Isthmian Ca- 
nal Commission. The address will be made 
b)' Archdeacon Bryan. Music will be fur- 
nished by the Marine band of Camp El- 
liott. Invited officials, organizations, and 
guests will assemble at the court house in 
Empire at 2.30 p. m., and proceed to the 
site of the new church, where the ceremo- 
nies will take place. The public is cordially 
invited to attend. 



The rock crusher and quarry at Rio 
Grande have been transferred from the Cen - 
tral Division to the Pacific Division. The 
maintenance of Rio Grande reservoir has 
also been transferred to the Pacific Division. 

The old interlocking switch system at Mi- 
raflores has been replaced by a modern sys- 
tem which will go into operation October 22. 
The station will control seven switches. 



$2,312,815.84 I $7,280,761.84 i$33,178,523.47 I $5,930,521.50 '$32,229,102.13 ! $80,931,724.78 



The tug La Boca has been laid up for re- 
pairs after an unbroken year of work in the 
Pacific entrance to the Canal, and the Cocoli 
has been put back in commission. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



59 



PANAMA RAILROAD QUARTERS. 

Improvements and Additions on Colon 
Beacli. 

Extensive repairs and additions are being 
made to the quarters provided by the Pan- 
ama Railroad Company for its employes in 
Colon, and it is thought that by the begin- 
ning of the year 1909 the majority of the 
railroad colony will be occupying new or 
renovated quarters. For several \ears pnst 
the lack of buildings has been pronounced, 
and the thowing open of railroad quarters 
to employes of the Isthmian Canal Commis- 
sion has made the building of new quarters 
a necessity. On September 1 there were on 
the waiting list 68 employes of the railroad 
compau}- who could not be given quarters. 

To those not familiar with the history of 
Colon, it may be illuminating to know 
that the citj- exists because the Pan- 
ama Railroad Company, in 1850, decided to 
make Ivimon Bay the Atlantic terminus of 
the transcontinental line. Manzanillo Isl- 
and was built upon a coral reef, and on the 
made and reclaimed land the general offices 
and terminal shops of the railroad were 
erected.' The quarter.s for employes were 
built near the offices, and from a few 
straggling buildings they have increased, 
until a line of houses stretches along the 
north beach for a mile or more. The old 
shops of the Company were located where 
some new quarters are now being erected. 

Washington House is the largest of the 
old quarters. It was built prior to 1851, and 
a third story has since been added to the 
original two-story building. The present 
structure is 173 feet long and 44 feet wide, 
and contains accommodations for fiftj- peo- 
ple, two in a room. .^long the full length 
of the front of the house are two verandas, 
one on each floor, and from them one may 
look across a grass parkwa}-, through palm 
trees, over Limon Bay, and beyond it to the 
Caribbean. There are few, if any, days on 
which a refreshing breeze does' not blow in 
from the sea. The remodeling of Washing- 
ton House has been confined to the interior. 
On the ground floor the dining-room has 
been made into one long room. The rooms 
on the west end, now occupied by the 
Washington Reading Room Club, are to be 
made into a private dining-room and a 
modern barber shop. 

A modern kitchen has been built in the 
rear of the hotel. The floor is concrete, the 
roof is ventilated, and all the furniture is 
raised above the floor so that the kitchen 
can be flushed with a hose every day. A cir- 
culating coffee urri of three units, in which 
coffee is made with sterilized water, a 12-foot 
steam table, a 12-foot portable range, steam 
heated pots for stock and vegetables, a 
charcoal stove for broiling meats, an ice box 
for fish, a serving pantry, all arranged so 
that the waiters ma^- fill their trays in regu- 
lar succession, entering the kitchen by one 
door and leaving by another, and never 
doubling on their tracks, are the principal 
furnishings of the kitchen. There is also a 
steam and hot water dish-washing machine. 
Adjoining the kitchen is the ice box, spe- 
cially constructed after the plan of the more 
recent of the line commissary coolers. It 
is filled once a week, has an ice capacity of 
eight tons and consumes five tons a week. 
In it a week's supply of meats and vege- 
tables is kept at a temperature of from 46 to 



50 degrees. A bit of sentiment connected 
with the a la carte meals is that all planked 
meats and fish are served on lignum vit£e 
planks cut from ties used for half a century 
on the Panama railroad. Washington House 
serves 200 meals daily. 

The house directly west of Washing- 
ton House, known as the Bennington, is 
being remodeled. The ground floor will be 
divided into two one-family quarters, and the 
second floor into twelve rooms about 11 feet 
by 10 feet, arranged in suites with baths. 
Garfield House, which is east of Wash- 
ington House is also to be remodeled, the 
work to be begun as soon as the present oc- 
cupants move into the new building named 
Lincoln House. On each floorthere will be 
six two-room, non-housekeeping suites with 
baths, each room to be about 13 feet square. 

Lincoln House is nearing completion, and 
an effort is bein.g made to have it ready for 
occupancy the first week in November. It 
fronts on E street, about three hundred 
yards from the beach, and although two 
new houses for married people are between 
it and the water, a glimpse of the sea may 
be had from the north veranda, and the 
breeze is almost unchecked. The house is 
of a special type, being really three oblong 
buildings with gable roofs, forming the 
front and sides of a large hall. This hall 
is 50 feet square, two stories high, is roofed 
with a skylight, and has a hardwood floor 
finished for dancing. Around three sides of 
this hall on the second floor runs a balconv, 
while the fourth side opens on to the ground 
floor and second story verandas. The house 
is two stories high, 125 feet long and 116 
feet deep, and a screened verandi on each 
floor runs completely around it. In addi- 
tion to living quarters for 80 men. the house 
will contain a billiard room, reading room, 
four drying rooms and four baths and toilet 
rooms. 

Similar in type to Lincoln House, but 
smaller, will be McKinley House, which 
is in process of construction on E street, 
opposite Lincoln House. It will be 97^2 
feet lon.g by 40 feet wide, two stories high, 
and will have screened verandas. On the 
ground floor will be six rooms, a reception 
room, and famil)- quarters consistingof four 
rooms and a bath. A matron will occupy 
the family quarters. The second floor will 
contain twelve rooms, each 10 feet by 12 
feet. It is intended for the woman emyloyes. 

Between the beach and the new quarters 
for men and women new family quarters 
are being constructed. One house, recently 
completed, is already occupied. It is a tjpe 
C, two-story, four-family house, 69x57 feet. 
Each quarters contains three bedrooms, a 
parlor, dining-room, kitchen and bath. A 
type B house is nearing completion. It is 
also a two-stor5' four-family house, and is 
69 feet by 47 feet 4 inches. Each quarters 
consists of a parlor, dining-room, kitchen, 
two bedrooms and a bath. Two type D, 
four-famil}', two-story houses will complete 
theadditions now authorized. These houses 
will be 68 by 36 feet, and each quarters will 
contain a parlor, dining-room, bedroom, 
kitchen and bath. This is the only type of 
house built by the Panama Railroad Com- 
pany in which the stairways leading to the 
second floor are on the outside of the build- 
ing. All the quarters have screened veran- 
das. 

For jears before the American occupation 



Washington House was the center of the 
social life of Colon, and it has continued to 
be so up to the present time. Now the 
center is about to change to Lincoln House. 
The old Washin.gton Reading Room Club 
at a meeting held last week decided to trans- 
fer its books and billiard tables from 
Washington House to Lincoln House. The 
control of the dancing hall and social fea- 
tures at Lincoln House has been placed in 
the hands of an executive committee elected 
at that meeting and consisting of R. Budd, 
chairman; G. E. Geer, representing the 
general manager's office; P. T. Murphy, 
representing the married quarters on the 
beach and Washington Hotel; John Purdum, 
representing Lincoln House, and D. E. 
Richard, representing Garfield House. The 
officers elected are: H. J. Slifer, president; 
J. S. Stewart, vice-president; H. B.Warren, 
secretary, P. G. Hoyt, treasurer. Member- 
ship in the Washington Reading Room Club 
is not confined to employes of the Panama 
Railroad Company or of the Isthmian Canal 
Commission, and the dancing floor at 
Lincoln House may be used by all persons 
to whom the executive committee sees fit to 
assign it. 

Memorial Resolutions. 

At a meeting of Culebra Lodge, No. 3, 
Knights of Pythias, October 14, 1908, the 
following resolutions were adopted : 

Resolved, That as the great and all-merci- 
ful God has seen fit to remove from our 
midst our esteemed and honored brother, 
James H. Averill ; and, while our loss has 
been great, we bow in accordance with His 
will, and look forward to the meeting in 
that world of everla.sting sunshine, when 
we shall be once more together, never more 
to part, for we shall know each other there; 
be it further 

Resolved, That we extend to his dear wife 
and little ones our sincere sympathy in this 
their great hour of sorrow ; be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions 
be sent to his family ; also to The Can.^i, 
Record and press for publication, and to 
become part of the minutes of this lodge. 

Resolutions of Sympathy. 

Whereas, Our Heavenly Father and 
Great Commander has removed from our 
midst Comrade Lewis B. Mickle; be it 

Resolved. That the General Henry W. 
Lawton Garrison, No. 40, Regular .^rmy and 
Navy Union of the U. S. A., has lost from 
its rank a most worthy comrade, whose ex- 
cellent qualities and noble character have 
cemented the ties of fraternity' and good fel- 
lowship with every member of our order; 
and be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions 
be spread upon the records of our Garrison, 
a copy sent to the National Commander of 
the Regular Army and Navy Union, Wash- 
ington, D. C, and to the wife of our de- 
parted comrade, Mrs. .'ilzadia Grace Mickle, 
Germantown, Columbia County, N. "V. 

By direction of the Garrison. 

Wm. M. Ridpath, 

Adjutant and Quartermaster. 



The three Lidgerwood unloaders at work 
on the La Boca dumps during September 
unloaded 11,293 cars of material brought 
from the Culebra Cut. As there are about 
20 cubic yards on each car, this makes an 
aggregate of about 225,860 cubic yards added 
to the La Boca dumps during the month. 



60 



THE CANAL RECORD 



CANAL WORK FOR SEPTEMBER. 

Monthly Report of the Chairman to the 
Secretary of War, 

CULEBRA, C. Z., October 17, 1908. 
The Honorable 
TiiJi Secretary o/ War, 
JVashinstojl, D. C. 

Sir: I have the honor to submit the fol- 
lowing report of operations on the Isthmus 
for the month of September, 1908: 

The work of reorganization as outlined in 
the report for July was continueci. Effective 
September 1, the Division of Material and 
Supplies was merged with the Quartermas- 
ter's Department. 

Department of Construction and Hn^i- 
neeriag 

The following table summarizes the prin- 
cipal items of construction work accom- 
plished by the Atlantic, Central, and Pacific 
Divisions during the month: 



ing the month, excavating a total of 32,112 
cubic }-ards. 

PORTO DEI.LO. 

Work was actively pressed, consisting of 
preparing a site for the power-plant, current 
repairs to equipment, strippina; the earth 
from the quarry, and various municipal and 
building work. 

NOMBRE DE DIOS. 

Investigations were made at Noinbre de 
Dios by the Chief Engineer of the Republic 
of Panama and the Assistant Engineer at 
Cristobal, as a committee to consider a re- 
port upon the effect of removal of sand on 
the town of Nombre de Dios, and the value 
of the sand. 

FLOATING EQUIPMENT. 

The tug Ljickenbach arrived on Septem- 
ber 30 with rock barges 13 and 14. With the 
exception of the stern wheel tow-boat, all 



Item. 


Unit. 


Atlantic. 


Central. 


Pacific. 


Total. 


Steam Shovel ExcTvation — 
In prism 


Cubic yards 

Cubic yards 

Cubic yards 

Cubic yards 

Cubic yards 

Cubic yards 


136.892 
48,414 


1.435.519 
30.286 


135,536 
2.701 


1.707.947 


Auxiliary 


bl,401 


Total 


185,306 

624.776 
63,029 


1,465,805 


138,237 
750.080 


1,789,348 


Dredge Excavation — 
In prism 






63.029 










Total 


687,805 




750,080 


1,437,885 


Hand Excavation — 


7.043 
3.470 


7.043 










3 470 












Total 




10,518 




10 518 




Cubic yards 

Tons (2240 lbs) 
Feet 










873.111 

43.36 
69.592 


1,476,323 

324.65 
260,088 

11.6 


888,317 

11.71 
18,929.2 


3,237 751 




379 7' 


Drilling 


34S 609 ^ 




Miles 






Miles 


3.98 
37,369 


3.2 
1,985 
988 
200 
145 
.14 
2.100 
765 
2.010 
3,315 
7.56 


7 IS 




Cubic yards 








16.555.5 


17,543.5 






2 








145 
.726 
11.9S0 
5.788 
18.735 
13.040 




Miles 




.586 
3.500 
5.023 
16.725 
8.035 

9.75 




Feet 

Feet 


6.380 


Sewers laid 




Feet 




Daily average number of laborers 

Rainfall 


Inches 


1,690 
11.57 



Atlantic Division. 

GATUN LOCKS. 

During the month the total amount exca- 
vated from the lock site was 111,984, cubic 
yards, place measurement, of which 104,780 
cubic yards were from the Canal prism, and 
7,204 cubic yards from the site for the new 
power-house. 

Seepage tests were continued during the 
month in boreholes in and around the locks. 

The power-house and storehouse were 
staked out. 

GATUN DAM. 

Dredge No 82 excavated 48,974 cubic yards 
of earth and soft rock from the slip leading 
to the proposed dock for the handling plant. 

On the south toe of the datn 42,857 cubic 
yards of Bas Obispo rock and 4,096 cubic 
yards of material from the spillway were 
dumped. On the north toe of the dam 
57,374 cubic yards of material from the 
spillway and Mindi were dumped. 

Daring the month 1,288 linear feet of tres- 
tle were constructed. 

SPILLWAY. 

Three steam shovels worked on the spill- 
way during the month, and removed a total 
of 41,210 cubic yards. 

MINDI. 

Two shovels were at work at Mindi dur- 



floating equipment for securing sand and 
stone is now in commission. 

CRISTOBAL. 

During the month seven dredges were 
operated, four being operated the entire 
month, and three a p.irt of the month, ex- 
cavating 624,776 cubic vards of material 
from the Canil prism. There were also 
dredged 14,055 cubic yards of loose coral for 
filling in the new corral site. 

At the dry dock, various equipment was 
repaired, and work was continued on the 
assembling of the stern wheel towboat. 

MUNICIPAL ENGINEERING. 

A large amount of grading, road building, 
construction of sewers and water works was 
accomplished at G.itun and Cristobal. The 
maintenance of municipal miprovements was 
also given the necessary attention. 

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION. 

Satisfactory progress was made on all 
buildings under con.struction. 

The powder house at Mindi hills and the 
detonator house at that point were 90 per 
cent completed at the end of the month. 

During the month the powder house at 
Mindi cut and the detonator house at the 
same point were completed. 

Central Division. 

During the month, the total amount of 
material exc ivated in the Central Division 
was 1,476,323 cubic yards, of which 421,139 



cubic yards were classified as earth, and 

1,055,184 cubic yards as rock. 

Of this quantity 1,455,805 cubic yard; 
were removed by steam shovels, 7,048 cubic 
}-ards by hand at the Bas Obispo quarry, and 
3,470 cubic yards by hand at the new powder 
house site up the Chagres River. 

The quantity* of material removed from 
the Canal prism was 1,442,557 cubic yards, 
while 27,241 cubic yards were removed from 
the Obispo Diversion, and 6,515 cubic yards 
at the new powder house up the Chagres 
River. 

The daily average number of steam shov- 
els at work during the month was 49.68 as 
compared with 52.58 for the month of August. 

For comparison with the work done dur- 
ing the corresponding month of the previous 
year, in the area embraced in the Central 
Division, the following table has been pre- 
pared : 





■sgg 


Classificatibu of 


p5 










material. 


" 1 2 




"■5=° 
^-J- 






o °'- 


■s 


';2 K — 


ii 


- 


?M 




pj.'^ 


•E 


O ^ > tfl 






• •=.5 


.M 


■ 5* 




o 






^ 


> > » 


t. 


H 


a 


W 


< 


< 


1907, 


cu. yds. 


cu. yds. 


CM. yds. 




Sept.... 


773,095 


525.513 


247.582 39.91 


24 


807 


1908. 












Sept.... 


1.465,805 


1,048,136 


417,669 49.68 


25 


1,180 



Rainfall durinfr the month: 1907. 10.61 inches: 1908, 
9,75 inches. 

The above table shows that the average 
output per shovel day was over 46 per cent 
greater in September, 1908, than in the 
corresponding month of the previous year. 

The output of the Bas Obispo rock crusher 
for the month was 10,2181/2 cubic yards, and 
that of the Rio Grande crusher 6,337 cubic 
yards. 

Pacific Division. 
DISTRICT NO. 1— LOCKS AND DAMS. 

The total excavation in this district dur- 
ing the month amounted to 138,237 cubic 
yards, as follovvs: 

Cubic yards. 

From Pedro Miguel lock site 28.833 

From Miraflores lock site 89.106 

From west dam at Mirat^ores 1,817 

From Canal prism at Cardenas Hill 18,181 

Outside of Canal prism (on line to Miraflores 
spillway) 300 



138.237 

At Pedro Miguel the work is largely pre- 
paratory, and consists of excavating for 
tracks leading from the lock site to the 
dumps, and excavating for trenches for 
drainage purposes below the lock site. The 
dump tracks on the west side were extended 
to lead to the west dam. This work has 
heretofore been delaj-ed on account of the 
15-inch water main, the location of which 
was changed on the 24th of the month. 

At Miraflores the excavated material was 
deposited as backfillin.g for the locks, and 
in the toe of the west dam. 

DISTRICT NO. 2 — DREDGING, AND LA BOCA 
SHIPWA\. 

Five dredges have been operated during 
the month, as follows: 



Dredge Type. 


Cubic yards. 


Remarks. 


In pr'm 


AuxiVy 


Culebra' Suction 
Gopher Ladder 
No. 14.. Ladder 
Dipper. jDipper. 
Sand- 1 
piper Suction 


432,312 
138,757 
129,608 
21,309 

28.094 




........ 


Scow measurement 
Place measurement 
Place measurement 
Place measurement 

Place measurement 


Total 


75).080 





THE CANAL RECORD 



61 



Current repairs were made on drerla;es, 
clapets, launches, tut;s and barges, includ- 
ing also erection of new plant. 

Additional borings are being taken at 
Cham6 Point to determine the depth and 
amount of sand available. The borings have 
shown a good quality of sand for a depth of 
from 30 to 40 feet below low water. 

A force has been employed during the 
month in clearing the Canal line, over which 
the dredges will operate between I/a Boca 
and Miraflores Locks. 

DISTRICT NO. 3— MUNICIPAL ENGINEERING 
AND BUILDINGS. 

The principal items of new construction 
accomplished in the District during the 
month are given ii a table included in the 
foregoing part of la's report. Roads, water- 
works and sewers, drains and other munici- 
pal improvements were maintained as usual. 
Mechatiieal Division. 

The usual work was performed in this 
Division in maintaining and operating equip- 
ment, electrical work, and the manufacture 
of repair parts and various material required 
in the construction of the Canal. 
Division of Meteor*>lofi:y and River Hy- 
draulics, 

The usual observations and measurements 
were continued during the month. 

Helocatlon of Pnnama Railroad. 

Satisfactory progress was made in the 
construction of connecting tracks from the 
present operated line of the railroid. in 
grading, the construction of trestles for fill- 
ing, and the construction of bridges and 
culverts. 

On the night of September 21, the Mira- 
flores tunnel cayed in from station 116-95 to 
the south portal, completely blocking the 
bore of the tunnel for a distance of about 200 
feet. A hole of about 360 cubic yards capac- 
ity opened up at the surface of the ground, 
about 130 feet north of the original location 
of the south portal. The hill showed a per- 
pendicular drop of 20 feet at the lina of 
cleavage, about 50 feet west of this hole. 
There are about 130,000 cubic yards of ma- 
terial in motion in a direction deflecting 
from the axis of the tunnel about 30 degrees 
in a southeasterly direction. The location 
of the south portal has been changed to 100 
feet farther south, and the concrete side 
walls for this 100 feet have been finished to 
the springing line of the arch. Work was 
st^pped on the south end on the 22d, as the 
aich might interfere with future excavation. 
Two hundred and forty linear feet of thecon- 
crete lining in the rock section was completed, 
1,585 cubic yards of concrete being placed. 
The location of the north portal has been 
changed to 50 feet farther north. 

During the month 2,831 linear feet of per- 
manent track were laid on tlie relocated line, 
making a total of 43,576 feet to date. 

The force of laborers during the month 
averaged 989 men. 

Qnai'tertnastcr's Department. 

On September 1, the Division of Material 
and Supplies was merged with the Quarter- 
master's Department, and the executive 
office of that division, formerly located at 
Cristobal, has been moved to Culebra. The 
Mount Hope storehouse has been made the 
general depot in charge of the Depot Quarter- 
master, who will also have charge of the 
planing mill at present located at Culebra, 
and the Stationer and Printer's plant, now 



located at Panama, both of wh'c'i plants 
will be moved to Cristobil, where they will 
be directl}' under his supervision. 

During September there was a decrease of 
over 1,500 in the number of West Indian 
laborers occupying Commission quarters as 
compared with the previous month. In Jan- 
uary, of this ye ir, with a West Indian force 
slightly smiUer thin in September, there 
were nearly 4,003 more West Indian labor- 
ers in qu irters than in September. From 
the commencement of the work there his 
been a marked tendency on the part of West 
Indians, as soon as they become .settled and 
familiar with conditions on the Isthmus, to 
leave Cornnissim qairters and gi to "the 
brush' ' or to independent quarters in the na- 
tive villages. The unusually large movement 
in September is believed to have been due to 
the fact tliat during the month the rule that 
unattached West Indians who do not subsist 
at Commission kitchens cannot have accom- 
m ditions in Commission barracks, was 
strictly enforced. It was thought that the 
strict enforcement of this rule would cause 
an increased patronage of the kitcliens; on the 
contrary, the effect has been to cause num- 
bers of the men to leave quarters. 

The following is a comparative statement 
of the force actuiUy at work on the last day 
of August and the last day of September: 



Eleven vessels entered at and eleven 

cleared fro-n the port of Ancon, and sixteeti 

vessels entered at and seventeen cleared 

from thiepjrt of Cristobal daringthe month. 

DIVISION OF PDLICE AND PRISONS. 

Durinjr the nnnth eST arrests were made, 
as cnipared with 43S for .Auffust. This in- 
creased nu nber of arrests is due principally 
to the arrest of 111 Itatiin^ on Sestemlier 
29, who had entered the Canal Zone and 
were occupying Commission quarters, al- 
thoug'i tliev were not emploves. As Coro- 
ner of the Can il Zone, the Chief of Police 
investigated eighteen deaths. Of these six 
were dueto railroad accidents, two to drown- 
ing and one to suicide. 

DIVISION OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

The usual business of this Division was 
conducted durinj^ the month, including the 
installation of new connections, the issuance 
of permits for the installation of plumbing, 
and the inspection of plumbing and sewers. 

Durin,^ the month 30 052.003 gallons of 
water were used in the city of Panama, and 
25,631,923 gallons in the city of Colon. 
DIVISION OF FIRE PROTECTION. 

No loss from fire was sustained during 
the month. 

DIVISION OF SCHOOLS. 

During the month preparation was made 





g 








Silver Men. 






Tobnl 






Artisans. 


Eiirope.nn 
Laborers. 

40c. 1 32c. 


We.st Indn 
Laborers. 

26c. 1 20c. 


Total 
Silver. 


Colli 
and 




1 ithly. 

O 1 


32c. as 
over. 


26c, 


Silver. 


August 

September 


4.396 
4,323 


4,644 
4.5i9 


4,920 
4,823 


1,076 
1.109 


4.505 1 411 
4.S65 1 377 


1.374 
1,263 


4,556 
4,103 


21,4.S6 
21.129 


25.8S2 
25,457 



At the present time there is a surplus of 
labor on the Isthmus. 

During the month the horticulturist of the 
Department distributed from the Ancon 
propagating garden to different points on the 
line 2,4S4 decorative and economic plants. 
Sub^isieuce Dspartmen'. 

The net profit in September for the opera- 
tion of the hotels and mess halls, not includ- 
ing the Tivoli hotel, was $9,535.20. The 
net loss on the Tivoli hotel was 12.002.33, 
making a net profit for the Department of 
$7.S32'87. 

The profits accumulating to the Subsist- 
ence Department to the present time will be 
used to counterbalance the loss which is 
ordinarily sustained during the winter 
months, when the price of such products as 
butter and eggs will be very high. 

Dep irtment of Ci^il Aden 'nistration. 
COURTS. 

In the Supreme Court, three cases were 
settled during September. One attorne\' 
was admitted. 

In the circuit courts, seven civil cases and 
IScriminil cases were disposed of, and in 
the district courts 33 civil and 553 criminal 
cases were disposed of. 

Z3NE TREASURY. 

A Treasurer of the Canal Zone was ap- 
pointed, to enter upon his duties on Octo- 
ber 1, and on that date the moneys and ac- 
cra.its of the Zone Treasury in the hands of 
lae Disbursing Officer (acting as Treasurer) 
-> ill lie transferred to the Treasurer of the 
Canal Zone. 

DIVISION OF REVENUES. 

The general revenues of the Canal Zone, 
collected by the Division of Revenues, 
amounted to $10,538.54. 



for the openin.g of the schools on October 1. 
Fort\--two teachers were appointed, twenty- 
four of whom are white .Americans, and 
eighteen colored West Indians. 

Department of Santialinn. 

[The substance of the report of this de- 
partment was published in The Canal 
Record last week.] 

Respectfully, 

H. F. Hodges, 

A' ting Chainnan and Chi/'/ Engineer. 



S •ldi>»r3, Sa-lors, ait'l Marines, 

All ex-soldiers, sailors, and marines, reg- 
ulars and volunteers, now residing on the 
Isthmus, are requested to send in their 
names, to be included in the roster or direc- 
tory of ex-service men on the Isthmus of 
Panama, which is bein^ compiled by Birt S. 
Sturtevant Garrison, No. 41, Regular .Army 
and Navv Union, U. S. A. Full name. Isth- 
mian address. United States address, date 
of enlistment, dite of discharge and rank, 
name of or.iin;zition in w'.iich service was 
rendered and remarks in reg ird to any note- 
worthv event with which identified, should 
be furnished. All communications may be 
sent to the undersigned. 

P.\UL D. M vv, CoiHin iiiJer, 

Culebra, Canal Zone. 



J ic'ts.jn L**e H •inin'»nrl. 

Information is wanted in regard to Jack- 
son Lee Hammond, of Jones county. North 
Carolina, who was in the employ of the 
Isthmian Canal Commission as late as March. 
1938. His family have had no word from 
hi.u since that time. .Anyone haifing kntw'.- 
edge of him is requested to communicate 
wita J. J. Gilbert, Matachin, C. Z. 



62 



TUB CA NAL RECORD 



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE. 

Women's Clubs and Other Features. 

The Isthmian Canal Rebekah Lod^e, No. 1, 
w.is instituted by B. R. Sisson, district 
deputy sjrand sire, in Fraternity hall, Gor- 
gona, on Saturday evening, October 10. 
Thirty-one were initiated and the following 
officers were elected: Mrs. B. F. Henkle, 
noble grand, and Jlrs. ^enry Lotz, vice- 
grand. The members of the onler are en- 
tering with enthusiam into their work which 
they are prepared to take up at once. .■\ 
pirt of the specific work of the order is the 
visiting of the sick andcaringfor the widows 
and orphans. Regular meetings will be 
.scheduled at once ami the lodge will proba- 
bly be increased in numbers within a short 
time. On institution night refreshments 
were served and the social part of the even- 
ing was greatly enjoyed by the members and 
their guests. 

The business meeting of ths Gorgona 
Woman's Club was held on Thursday. Octo- 
ber IS, when the organ izition of the depart- 
mental work was the main feature of the 
discussion. A circular letter has been sent 
out by the chairman of the educational 
committee of thi Zone Federation which 
was presented for consideration at this meet- 
ing. It is the desire of this department to 
keep the clubs in touch for the purpose of 
working along the same lines, in study as 
well as in any public work that may be 
taken up. At a recent talk before the club 
the use of year books of other clubs was 
urged, and it is announced that a supply of 
such year books is in the hands of the reci- 
procity committee of the Federation and 
copies may be had upon application to tlie 
i'epresentative of the committee in each 
club. Postage both v.ays is to be paid by 
the club making requisition for the books, 
which must be returned within one month 
from the time requisition is made. The 
toys remaining from the 1907 Christmas 
celebration have been made over to the 
philanthropy committee for such disposition 
of them as it sees fit. Plans for the coming 
Christmas celebration are already in hand, 
and the woman's club, having taken the 
initiative, will ask the assistance of the 
Young Men's Christian Association and the 
Gorgona Sunday school. 

The entertainment for the festival of All 
Hallow-e'en in Gorgona is being arranged 
by the Young Men's Christian Association. 
There will be an old fashioned dance, and 
an entertainment of unique character is 
promised. On election night, November 3, 
there will be an entertainment at the club- 
house, followed by a smoker. 

The Las Cascadas Woman's Club had an 
uuusually interesting meeting on Thvirsday, 
October 15, when Mrs. R. W. Fenn, of Pan- 
ama, was the guest of honor and gave a talk 
on the work that is being done by the phi- 
lanthropy department of the -Ancon Wom- 
an's Club, of which she is chairman, and on 
the Leper colony at Palo Seco. Much of 
the attention of the department is devoted 
to the insane wardsof the Ancon Hospital, 
and an exhibit of basket and needle work 
by the patients was a feature of the talk. 
The meeting was held at the residence of 
Mrs. W. B. Green. There was an unusuall)' 
large attendance. The club will be enter- 
tained October 23 by Mrs. W. L. Thompson. 

The Cristobal Woman's Club will hold its 



regular meeting on Wednesday afternoon, 
October 21, the program being in charge 
of the home department. Mrs. Hiram J. Sli- 
fer, recently appointed chairman of that 
department, will make an address. 

The Pedro Miguel Woman's Club enjoyed 
a social afternoon October 15, when a re- 
ception was given liy the members to the 
out-going and in-coming presidents. Games 
were enjoyed and elaborate refreshments 
were .served. The club presented Mrs. F. B. 
RoVjerts, the retiring president, witli a 
.souvenir spoon in token of appreciation of 
her work during the last year. A gift was 
also presented to Mrs. Livington, an active 
member of the club, who is leaving for her 
home in Jamaica. The business meeting, 
October 21, will be held at the residence of 
the president, Mrs. F. W. Waters. 

Social interest in Paraiso seems to be 
c.;ntered in the card club which meets regu- 
larly, the members greatly enjoying the di- 
version. 

The Culebra Woman's Club will begin its 
regular study course at the next meeting, 
October 29. The club has met with a great 
loss in the death of the treasurer, Mrs. W. H. 
Bogart, which occurred at San Jose, Costa 
Rica, October 13. Mrs. Bogart had been an 
active member of the organization during 
the past year and was greatly interested in 
the work. Her death, due to ga.stritis. was 
.sudden and quite unexpected. 

The governing board of the Ancon Wom- 
an's Club held it first meeting at the resi- 
dence of the president on Saturday, October 
17. The work for the year was scheduled 
and committees appointed. The regular 
meetings of the club will be held as hereto- 
fore, on the first and third Wednesday of 
each month, and the departments will ar- 
range their own meetings. The merging of 
the educational and literary departments 
will result in the organizing of study classes, 
and a magazine club is contemplated. The 
resignation of the chairman of the art de- 
partment was tenilered, but not accepted, 
and the department will take up the work 
as scheduled. This will include a studv 
class, which will embrace a survey of Pana- 
manian art, pottery, basketry, and architec- 
ture. The regular art section of the Ancon 
Woman's Club, incorporated into organiza- 
tion last year, will, it is believed, separate 
from the club, and an art league, to extend 
across the Isthmus, will be formed. The 
scope is too broad for such a movement to 
be confined within the limits of a single or- 
ganiz^ation. The bazaar in aid of the library 
fund proposed by the home department, will 
be turned over to the club, and will be held 
early in December. The next regular meet- 
ing of the club will be at the Tivoli, Octo- 
ber 21. 

The members of the Woman's Guild of 
Trinity Church, Culebra, were entertained 
bv the Guild of St. Luke's Church, Ancon, 
on Monday, October 19, the reception being 
given at the residence of the chaplain. St. 
Luke's Guild is contemplating a reception 
.similar to the one given by the organization 
in February. The annual meeting, with elec- 
tion of officers, will take place November 2. 



PERSONAL. 

Dr. and Mrs. I.,loyd Nolan, of Colon Hos- 
pital, sailed on the Cartago on October 13, 
for a six weeks' leave of absence to be spent 
in Costa Rica. Dr. G. H. Putney, of Cris- 
tobal, sailed on the Kspeianza on the same 
date, for a vacation of six weeks in the 
States. 

.\mong the passengers returning to the 
Isthmus on the Alliatua, which arrived at 
Cristobal on Monday, October 19, were: 
L. K. Rourke and wife of Empire; George 
D. Brooke and wife, and L. D. Cornish of 
Culebra, and Lieut. I-'rederic Hears and 
familv of Colon. 



A new storehouse and spare-part ware- 
house for the Pacific dredging fleet is to be 
built at La Boca. It will be 50 feet by 100 
feet and will be located on the water's edge 
in front of the machine shop. 



Bas Obispo Sunday School. 

.\ Sunday school with twenty-one mem- 
bers was organized on September 13, in the 
Bas Obispo club rooms, the membership hav- 
ing gradually increased since. On October 
14 a very successful sociable and entertain- 
ment was given, about fifty people being 
present. 

The school is now considering plans for 
an entertainment to raise a fund for a suit- 
able instrument, either to purchase an or- 
■gan or to assist the Bas Obispo Club in the 
purchase of a piano for the joint use of the 
two organi7.ations. 

Culebra Bachelor Girls' Clnb. 

Invitations are being issued by the Bach- 
elor Girls' Club of Culebra, for their "Hal- 
low-e'en" dance, to be held in the Y. M. 
C. A. hall, Thursday evening, October 29, 
at 8.15. It is the desire of the club that as 
many ladies as possible appear in fancy 
dress. 

Knights of Pythias Musicale 

To all Knights of Pythias: You are invited 
to attend a musicale and entertainment to 
be given in K. of P. Lodge hall, Cristobal, 
on Saturday night, October 31, at 9 o'clock. 
Bring your ladies and friends. 

O. C. KlLGOUR, 
Acting K. of R. and S. 

The regular Tivoli Club dance will be 
given on Saturday evening, October 24, at 
Hotel Tivoli. 

Concert by the I. C. C. Band. 

CULEBRA. C. Z . 
Sunda.v. October 25. 190S. at 6.00 p. m.: 

PROGRAM. 

1 March— H'a/rf;««<? Losey 

2 Selection— .Vi7/'.t Merry Melodies Mills 

(a —Pilgrim's Sunn of Hope Batiste 

3 1* Schottische— ((7;»-« a Boy Says " IVill 

I yon?" Allen 

4 .Serenade — La Paloma Xradier 

5 .Selection— ?7»'.S«««v South Larape 

6 Intermezzo — After Sunset Pryor 

I a Medley March — fm Afraid to Go Home 
in the Dark Van Alstyne 
1^ Characteristic— A'«<.?/;Vi<- Bagley 

8 0\<t^m<:— Four Ag.es of Man I.achner 

9 Descriptive— r/jc Racket at Gillisans DeWitt 

Synopsis — The guests gather at Gilligan's: after their 

arrival Gilligan sings a song, which is followed by 
a country dance. The star singer then renders a 
touching ballad, after which the bagpipes strike 
up. " Are ye's all ready?" shouts Gilligan. "Yis." 
"Then tire away." S. regular "welt the floor" 
.'uid " slip " time follows. .\ sand jig conies next, 
and the festivities close by all singing "Saint 
Patrick's Day in the Morning." 

10 March— 5««/ia.so Flynn Morse 

Ch.\s. E. Je^nisgs, Musical Dijcctoy. 
A concert ttill be given at the Hotel Tivoli, Sun- 
day. November 1. 

The steamship Tkelma sailed from Gulfport, Miss., 
on October IM. with a cargo of 1.232 piles for the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission. 



TilE CANAL RECORD 



63 



COMPENSATION FOR INJURIES. 

Further Definition of L.a\v l>y Comptrol- 
ler of the Treasury. 

The act of Congress providing compensa- 
tion for injuries incurred by an artisan or 
laborer in hazardous employment under the 
Isthmian Canal Connnibsion, as published in 
The Canal Rkcord of June 17, 190.S. and 
as defined b3- the decision of the Comptroller 
of the Treasury, published in the issue of 
September 16, has been further defined in 
the following decision: 

Washington, U. C, Sept. 26, 1908. 

The Chaiyman of ihi: Isthmian Canaf Commission. 

Sir — I have received your letter of the 14th 
instant as follows: 

I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of 
yourdccision of September 1. 190S. in reference to the 
regulations of the Connnission srantin^ injury leave 
with pay to its employes, in connection with the pro- 
visions of the Act of Congress of May 30. 190S, (3.=; 
Stat-.-SSe). 

In view of the couclusions which you reached upon 
the quotation submitted in my letter of" .\ugnst 20. 
190S. I request a decision njjon other questions here- 
in stated, brought to my attention by the Examiner 
of Accounts. 

The conti-acts of employment with employes of the 
Commission on the Isthmus, and the regulations of 
the Commission, contain the following provisions as 
to sick le.'ue with pay and hosintal care and attend- 
ance. The.se regulations took effect July 1. 1907: 

"Toa.ssist the Government in mainlaininga skilled 
force on the Isthmus, all regular emplo>es above the 
grade of l.-i borer, unaccustomed to a tropical climate, 
may be granted fifteen <lays' sick leave with pay for 
each six tnonths' ser\-ice, on the certificate of an au- 
thorized physician in the ser\'ice of the Department 
of Health of the Isthmian Canal Commission, that 
.he employe has been unable to work on account of 
illness contracted through no fault of his own. or 
because of injury. 

"This leave may be cmnulative to an amount not 
exceeding thirt.v days, and pa>ment for s;ime shall 
be made the first pay period after the employe returns 
to duty: but no p.'iyment sh.-dl be made for time lost 
in excess of the sick leave due at the time of such ill- 
ness or injury. 

".All employes, in case of illne.ss or injury, will re 
ceive free medical care and attention at the hospitals. 

"In caseof illness or injury, latiorers shall receive 
free medical care and attendance at the hospitals." 

These provisions are separate and distinct from the 
injury leave referred to in .\our decision. 

The questions upon which J now wish your decision 
are the following: 

1. Is an employe of the Commission who comes 
within the class of emploj'es included in the .\ct of 
May 30. 190S. entitled to receive under his contr.ict of 
emi>!oyment. and the regulations of the Conimi.ssion. 
pay forabsence. not exceeding thirty days, when such 
absence is caused by sickness resulting from an in- 
jnrj' incurred in the performance of his duties? 

3. Is an employe of the Commission who does not 
come '.x-ithin the class of employes included in the 
.\ct of May 30. 1903. entitled to receive, under his con- 
tract of employment, and the regulations of the Com- 
mission, pa.v for absence, not exceeding thirty days, 
when such absence is caused by sickness resulting 
from an injury incurred in the performance of his 
duties? 

3. Is the Commission authorized to furnish an em- 
ploye, w-hois in the class referred to in questitiu No. 
l.free medical care and attendance at the hospitals 
as provided in his contract and the regulations of the 
Commission? 

4. Is the Commission authorized to furnish to an 
employe who is in the cla.ss referred to in question 
No. 2. free medical care and attendance at the hospi- 
tals as provided in his contract and the regulations 
of the Commission? 

.=i. Is the Cotnmission authorized to pay the com- 
pensation of an employe, who is in the class referred 
to in question No. 1. for a period of time after July 31 , 
1908. and within the limits of its regulations and 
contract with the employe, if the injury was incurred 
prior to .August 1 . 190S? 

6. Is the Commission authorized to pay the com- 
pensation of an employe, who is in the cl.-iss referred 
to in question No. 2. for a period of time after Jul.v 
31. 190S. and within the limits of its regulations and 
contract with the employe, if the injury w.as incurred 
prior to .August 1. 190,-.? 

I request that your decision on these questions be 



sent to the \V.:shington office of the Commission, in 
order th.-it the subst.ance of it ma>' be c;ibled to me 
here. 

THE HKCISIOX. 

I will answer your <|Uestions in the order 
stated. 

In my decision of the 1st instant, upon 
your request of the 20th ultimo, the act of 
May oO, 1908 (35 St.-it., 556). was construed 
as it applied to employes of the Isthmian 
Canal Commission. It was decided therein 
that : 

"In the absence of Congressional enact- 
ment, the regulations of the Commission set 
out in your letter providin.g for tlie leave 
with pay for thirty days or a fractional part 
thereof to employes of the Commission for 
injuries incurred in the line of duty; and 
thirty days leave, or fractional part thereof, 
with pay to laborers of the Commission for 
injuries incurred while in the performance 
of duty and while incapacitated for duty b\- 
reason of such injury not exceeding thirty 
days, were undoubtedly made with authority 
at the time they were made, considering the 
broad authority granted the President b.\- 
the provisions of the original Spooner .^ct. 
authorizing him to construct the Canal. 

"But when Congress stepjied in and 
enacted, as it did. the act of May 30, 1908, 
(35 Stat., 556) set out in yotir letter, pro- 
viding just what kind of relief for personal 
injuries and exactly to whom and under 
what circumstances it should be given and 
included the employes of the Isthmian 
Canal Commission in .such act, I am forced 
to the conclusion that the enactment is ex- 
clusive, after it came into effect, and that it 
is no longer in the power of the Commission 
by regulations, past or present, to enlarge 
or diminish the provisions of that act as to 
relief extended to employes of this Commis- 
sion for injuries received in the line of their 
said empk>yment. 

".\ different holding would be an attempt 
to broaden and modify an .\ct of Congress, 
and to make a discrimination in favor of a 
class, where Congress legislating concernin.g 
such class did not see fit to make such dis- 
crimination." 

Your questions are answered as follows: 

1. Xn employe who comes within the pro- 
visions of the Act of May 30, 1908, is not 
entitled to receive pay by virtue of the teruis 
of his contract, but can only be paid under 
the terms and conditions and upon compli- 
ance with the .-Vet of May 30, 1908. This 
question is therefore answered in the nega- 
tive. 

2. .\11 regulations providing for payment 
to an employe not coming within the provi- 
sions of the .A.ct of May 30, 1908, during 
absence on account of sickness resulting from 
injuries incurred in the performance of duty 
are unauthorized and of no effect since the 
passage of such act. Such an employe is 
not entitled to pay for and on account of ab- 
sence occasioned as stated in this question. 

3. The contingent benefit of hospital care 
and treatment furnished to an employe when 
authorized and contracted for as a part of 
the compensation for services rendered, is 
to be di.stinguished from the payments on 
account of injuries provided for in the .-icl 
of Blay 30, 1908. The hospital care anil 
treatment is a payment for service already 
rendered, while the payment for injury is 
in the nature of damages for such injury 
and is governed by thc-^ct of May 30, 1908. 

The Commission is authorized to provide 
by contract for furnishing an employe fuch 
as is indicated in this question, free medical 



care and hospital attendance as a part of his 
compensation for services rendered, 

4. The answer to question 3 applies here, 
and for the .same reason free medical care 
and attendance at hospitals may be provided 
as a part of the compensation for services 
rendered to the employe indicated in this 
question. 

5. I am of the opinion that under the facts 
stated in this question, the ri.ghts of the 
employe to payment under his contract for 
an injury prior to .\ugust 1, 1908, for the 
period provided for in such contract, became 
vested at the time of the injury and that 
the right to payment thereunder is not af- 
fected by the .\ct of May 30, 1908, 

The payment indicated in this question 
would therefore be anthorized. 

6. The answer to question 5 applies here 
and for the reasons therein given 3'ou would 
be authorized to make the payments indi- 
cated herein. 

Congress has plenary power to re,gulate 
and control the compensation to be paid to 
employes of the Isthmian Canal Commission 
for services tit futitro {Crenshaw \. United 
Stales, 134 U. S., 99), but it has no power 
to deprive an employe of the tight to the 
compensation earned under his contract, or 
of a contingent benefit accrued prior to the 
passage of the act affecting such compensa- 
tion as a part thereof. 

The cases stated in questions 5 and 6 are, 
therefore, to be distinguished from the cases 
stated in questions 1 and 2, although each 
may arise under existing contracts. 

This deci.sion has been forwarded as re- 
quested to the Washin.gton office. 
Respectfully, 

R. J. Tracewei<i., 

Comptrollet . 

OFFICIAL CIRCUL.-KR. 

Division of Mereur.>Iog^y and River Hy- 
draulics Abulislied. 

Cri.EBRA. C. Z.. October 12. 1908. 
Circular No. 1^3K. 

Effective this date ; The Division of Meteorology 
and River Hydraulics is abolished, and the work 
heretofore performed by that division is ])]aced in 
charge of Mr. C. M. Saville, Assistant Kngineer. 
The records and office force will be transferred to 
the office of the Chairman. 

H. V. Hodges, 
Acting Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES. 

Activities of the Young Men's Christian 

Association. 

EMPIRE. 

On Thursdaj- evening, October 15. a pool and bil- 
liard tournament was started with thirty contestants 
in pool and ten in billiards. On the same evening a 
bowling tournament was opened with thirty-five con- 
testiints. I^Iuch interest is manifested in each of the 
touniamenls. 

Plans are now being perfected for a great time on 
election day. November 3. A regular voting system 
for the United States presidential candidates will be 
entered into, which will give every man of Empire a 
chance to vote — not only for President, but forM;iyor 
of Empire. The niajonilty candidate is intended 
to add to the entertiiinment fe.iturc of the evening, 
when it is expected that the election returns from 
the States will be received at inter\Mls Other 
features of entertainment will beau orches.ra con- 
cert, vocal and instrumental selections, etc. 

On Thanksgiving Day the 19('S Isthmian champion- 
ship bowling tournament, sinyle and double, will be 
rolled off on the Empire Y. M. C. A. alleys. Full 
particulars later. 

Mr. John C. Walts is the new manager of the pool 
room. 

An indoor baseball team was organized Saturday 
evening, and Jolni Mcl.oud was elected captain. 
Games are wanted, and a league is hoped for. 



64 



THE CANAL RECORD 



COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT. 

ICE CREAM ON SLNDAYS. 

Beginning Sunday, October 18, the com- 
missary at Cristobal will sell ice cream in 
packa.ues suitable for carrying home, which 
will enable patrons of the commissary to 
purchase ice cream on Sundays. This is an 
experiment at the Cristobal commissary. 
If it proves successful, the same plan will 
be extended to other commissaries. 



COMMISSARY PRICES 

For wt-ek heginiiinj; October 20: 
FRESH MEATS. 

Pt'ice. 

Mutton— StewnuE per lb 6 

Shoulder and neck (not under 

6 ijounds) per lb 7 

Enlire foreqnarter (not under 

in pounds) per lb 8 

Lee (8 to 10 pounds) peril) 16 

Short-cut chops per lb 20 

l.iinib— StewuK per lb 6 

Entire forequarter per lb 8 

Leg (6 to 8 pounds) per lb 27 

Chops P^-rll' 29 

VeMl-Stewing ner 1b 10 

Entire forequarter (15 to 20 lbs). ...per lb 11 

I.oin P'°'"lb 22 

Short-cut chops l)er lb 23 

Cutlets "erlb 23 

Pork-Cnts P<='- lb 20 

Beef-Suet ^"^^ "" 

Soup '"■'■"' 8 

.Stew t^"" "• 12 

Coruca ^=r 'b-, 1-'. 14, 16 

Pot loasL ui""iSiUom uuLl; per ib 17 

Kib-roast, second cut uiot uuder 3 

pounusj per lb 19 

Kib-roasl. short cut vuot uuder 3V2 

puunusj Ptr lb 23 

Sirloin roast P<:r "^ 29 

Kump ruasl Pt'' lb i.'i 

1-uiicihousc roast per lb 29 

blc.k. round Pt^r lb 23 

Kib !":■■ 'b 24 

birloin !'" lb 29 

I'orlcrliouse Pel lb 29 

Kump V" lb 29 

Tenderloin Pcr lb 30 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Liveis-Beef P^f lb 12'/2 

^JJ^^1■ each 65 

.Sausaue— iwk V" 'b 19 

Leoeiwurst per lb 17 

Sweet breaa — Veal each 1.20 

O-*^ Louyucs each 90 

Pias- feet, pickled per lb 14 

l'it;a loiii;u<.s. pickled per lb 15 

Et'BS, Iresli dozen 34 

I'OLLTKV AND GAME. 

Chickens— Lirtsscd unilk-fed) e.ich 1.30 

l,ir«e .uiilk-lcd; each 1.50 

capons each 2.40 

Bioikrs each 60 

Fowls, medium aud larue each, SOc. and l.nu 

Tuikc.vs V" lb 30 

Squabs «'cb 45 

Suckling piBS twliolei each 3.50 

SuckliuK pius l.oue-haif) e.ich 1.73 

CUKED and PICKLED MEATS. 

Uacon— .Strips per Ib 23 

English, breakfast sliced per Ib §26 

Ham— Sugar-cured, sliced per Ib §25 

one-half, for boiling per lb §21 

Ferris per lb 20 

Beef, salt, family per Ib 16 

•Siilt pork per lb 13 

DAIRY PRODUCTS. 

Buttel — Prints, prime quality per lb 35 

Cheese— Roquefort perlb 45 

Neufchatel each 6 

Vouug America pei lb ■ 22 

Swiss per lb 33 

Edam each 1.05 

McLaren's jar 15 

PiiLvter's tin 22 

Goiida per lb ;4 

Philadelphia Cream each 22 

French cliecse lu lins — Cainembert, Roque- 
fort, Brie, Neufchatel tin 20 

VEGETABLES -AND FRUITS. 

Tomatoes (local only) perlb S 

White potatoes perlb iVt 



Cabbage perlb 4 

Onions perlb SVz 

Cucumbers per lb 8 

S(iu.-ish (summer) perlb 3 

Beets per lb 3 

Celery butich 15 

Carrots per lb 3 

Turnips perlb 3 

Lemons dozen 24 

Oranges dozen IS 

Graiiefruit each 3 

Graties. Concord and Niagara per lb 8 

Grapes, Calirornia, Tokay aud Malaga.. ..per lb S 

§ Sold only from cold-storage and not from Com- 
miss;iri^. 

KHinfall, October I to 17, 1908. Inclusive. 

(.MIDNIGHT TO MIDNIGHT.) 

Maximum 
stations. in Total, 

one day 

Atlantic Division — 

Cristobal 2.35 5.73 

BrazosBrook 2.09 7.62 

Gatun 2.13 6.35 

Bohio 1.75 5.97 

Central Division — 

Tabernilla 1.62 5.41 

San Pablo 1.12 4.09 

Bas Obispo 1.29 4.52 

Ganiboa Abolished. 

Empire •' 1.40 3.90 

Caiiiacho -85 2.81 

Cnlebra 1.56 3 85 

Rio Grande 1.32 3.24 

Pacific Division — 

Pedro Miguel I 70 4.51 

Ul Boca .85 3.62 

Ancon 1.39 3.74 

Upt>cr Chagt-es. 

Alhajuela l.;S 3.97 



MOVEMENT OP OCEAN VESSELS. 



Stages of the Chagres. 

Maximum height of Chagres above low 
water for the week ending midnight, Oc- 
tober 17, 1908: 





SjATIONS. 




■a 


3 






c 






2 








> 


< 


o 


a 


d 


Height of low water 












above mean sea 












level, feet 


129 


92 


46 








M.'ixiiniun height ab. 












low water, feet: 












Sunday. O.'t. 11.... 


2.32 


1.88 


3.90 


8.90 


4.40 


Monday, Oct. 12 .... 


1.85 


2.30 


3.85 


8.00 


3 74 


Tuesday. Oct. 13. ... 


1.70 


2.08 


3 10 


6.70 


3.00 


Wedu.sd.iv. Oct. 14 


2.05 


2 66 


3.65 


6.55 


2.rO 


Thursday. Oct. 15. . 


1.90 


2.65 


4-3'i 


8.00 


3.95 


Friday. Oct. 16 


1.00 


1.63 


2.70 


6.90 


2.85 


.Saturd.iy. Oct. 17... 


LIS 


173 


2.65 


5.90 


•2,10 


Maximum for week.. 


2.32 


2 66 


4.30 


8.90 


4.40 



* Approximately. 



Misdirected Letters, 

Division of Dead Letters. 
Ancou. C. Z., Octo ler 20. 190^. 
The folluwin-:: insurficiently addressed letters, origi- 
nating in the United States and its po.ssessions, have 
been received in the olfice of the Director of Posts, 
and may be obtained on request of addressee: 



Agnew. Lulu 
Allele. ClKis. 
Barton, Kolit. 
Bell, Florence 
IJrady. Mrs Lucy 
Brown. J. F. t i-:ngineer) 
Blinker, Mrs J. H. 
Casey, .Mr~. W. B. 
Cli:incy. R. 
Clark, A. H. 
Coopev, G. K. 
G.dliger, Win. 
Groiint. F. E. 
Hart. Richard 
Henrv. Mrs. Chas. 
llill.iver 
Hiscock. W. P. 
Howe, Win. G. 



Jack. H. G. 
Johnson, .Mr. J. 
Keller. Kev. John 
Leibfritz, Herman 
Lipsey. S. E. 
Miller. S. B. 
Mollenhaur, Egniont 
MoUenhaur. Arnold 
Keedhani, Mrs. E. 
Pctlil. Wm. N. 
Pierce, Palmer 
Sheehey, Alls. D. 
Starts. Mrs. F. J. 
Steers. C. A. 
Strong, J. M. 
W.ilker. W. K. 
Wells. G. M. 
Winder, Clarence 



The following steamers h.nve recently arrived at La 
Boca : October in, Hnasco. from Valparaiso : October 
12. licuador. from Buen:iventura : October 14. City of 
Sydney, from San Francisco. Departures were ; Oc- 
tober 13. Guatemala, for Valparaiso ; October 14, In- 
diana., for Sau Francisco. 



The following is a list of the .sailings of the Pan 
ania Railroad Steamship Company, of the Royal 
Mail Steam Piicket Company, of the llamburg- 
.\nierican Line, and of the United Fruit Company's 
Line, the Panama Railroad Company's dates being 
subject to change; 

FROM NEW YORK To COLON. 

Colon P. R. R., Saturday Oct. 

Esperanza P. R. R.Thursday Oct. 

Prinz Joachim H.-A SaturjJay Oct. 

Finance P. R. R.Tuesday Oct. 

Tagus R.-M Saturday Oct. 

Advance P. R. R, Monday Nov. 

AUiauca P. R. R. Saturday Nov. 

Prinz Aug. WilheIm...H.-A Saturday Nov. 

..P. R 

..R.-M 

..P. R 

...H.-A 

..P. R. 

Orinoco R.-M .Saturday Nov. 

Advance P. R. R.Saturday Nov. 

Allianca P. R. R.Thursday Dec. 

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm...H.-A .Saturday Dec. 

Colon P. R. R.Tuesday Dec. 

Atrato R.-M Saturday Dec. 

Panama P. R. R.Monday Dec. 

Finance P. R.R.Saturday Dec. 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Saturday — Dec. 

.All the steamers of the Hamburg-Apierican and 
Rojal Mail lines call at Kingston enroute to Colon. 

FROM COLON TO NEW YORK. 

Advance P. R. R.Mond.Ty Oct. 

Tagus R.-M Tuesday Oct. 

Allianca P. R. R.Saturday ....Oct. 

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm...H.-.A Tuesday Oct. 

Colon P. R. R.Thursday Oct. 

Magdalena R.-M:. ...Tuesday Nov. 

Esperanza P 



Colon 

Magdalena 

Panama 

Prinz Joachi.n... 
Finance 



R. Thursday .. ..Nov. 

..Saturday Nov. 

R.Tuesday Nov. 

..Saturday Nov. 

, R.Monday Nov. 



17 

22 

24 

27 

31 

2 

7 

7 

12 

14 

17 

21 

23 

28 

28 

3 

5 

8 

12 

14 

19 

19 



I'iiiaiice 


.,..P 


Prinz Joachim 


....H 


Advance 


....P 


Orinoco 


....R. 




....P 



R. R.Tuesday Sov. 

R. R.Monday Nov. 

-.A Tuesday Nov. 

R. R.Sunday Nov. 

-M Tuesday Nov. 

R. R.Friday Nov. 

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm...H.-A Tuesday — Nov. 

Colon P. R. R.Wednesday ..Nov. 

Panama P. R. R.Monday Nov. 

Atrato R.-M Tuesday Dec. 

Finance P. R. R.Sunday Dec. 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Tuesday Dec. 

.Advance P. R- R.Friday Dec. 

Trent R.-M Tuesday Dec. 

Allianca P. R. R.Wednesday ..Dec. 

Colon P. R. R.Monday Dec. 

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm.H.-M Tuesday Dec. 



Panama 

Tagus 

Finance 

Piinz Joachim... 

.advance 

Allianca 



.P. R. R.Sunday Dec. 



..R.-M Tuesday Dec. 

. . P. R. R.Friday Jan. 

..H.-A Tuesday Jan. 

..P. R. R.Wednesday ..Jan. 
..P. R. R.Monday Jan. 

FROM NEW ORLEANS TO COLON. 

Cartago U.F.C.. Saturday Oct. 

Parismina U.F.C.. Saturday Oct. 

Heredia U.F.C.. Saturday Nov. 

Cartago U.F.C.. Saturday Nov. 

Parismina U.F.C.. Saturday Nov. 

Heredia U.F.C.. Saturday Nov. 

FROM COLON TO NEW ORLEANS. 



Heredia . . . . 

Cartago 

Parismina.. 

Heredia 

C.ulago 

Parisiniua. . 



.U.F.C.. Tuesday 
.U.F.C.Tuesday 
.U.F.C.. Tuesday 
..U.F.C.Tuesday 
..U.F.C.Tuesday 
.U.F.C.Tuesday 



.Oct. 

. Nov. 

.Nov. 

.Nov. 

.Nov. 

.Dec. 



19 

20 

24 

27 

29 

3 

3 

9 

10 

15 

17 

20 

24 

25 

30 

1 

6 

8 

11 

15 

16 

21 

22 

27 

29 

I 

5 

6 

II 

24 

31 

7 

14 
21 
28 

27 
3 
10 
17 
24 
1 



FROM COLON TO BARBADOS, CALLING AT TRINIDAD. 

Trent R.-M Tuesday ....Oct. 27 

Tagus R.-M Tuesday Nov. 10 

Magdalena R.-M Tuesday Nov. 24 

FROM COLON TO NEW ORLEANS VIA KINGSTON. 

Mexican Leyland Line about. .Oct. 31 

The Panama railroad steamships sail at 3 p. m 
from dock at Cristobal direct to New York. 

The Prinz steamers of the Hamburg-American line 
sail from Colon at 1 p. m. \-ia Kingston, Jamaica, 
for New York. 

All Ku.\al .Mailsteamersmentionedaboveleaveearly 
in the nioming from Colon via Kingston, Jamaica, 
for New York. All mail and passengers should be 
on board e.irlv on day of sailing. 

I'he . steamers of tlie United Hiuil Company's line 
sail from New Orleans at 10 a. m for Colon, calling 
at Puerto Barrios, and from Colon at 1.30 p. in., via 
Port l.iuioii and Puerto Barrios, for New (irleans. 

.Sailings of the French line (Cie. Gfn^rale Trans- 
atlantique) for \ euezuelan ports, Martinique and 
Guadeloupe ou the 3d aud 20th of each month. 



CANAL 




RECORD 



Volume II. 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1908. 



No. 9. 



The Canal Record 

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of the 
ISTHNIiAN CANAL COMMISSION 

"The Canal Record" is issued free of charge, otie 
copy each, to all employes of the Commission and Pan- 
ama Railroad Company whose names are on i lie "sold" 
roll. Extra copies can be obtained from the news 
stands of tiie Panama Railroad Company for five cents 
each 

Address all Communications 

THE CANAL RECORD 

Ancon, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama* 

No communication, either Jor publication or reguest- 
ins injormation, will receive attention unless signed 
with the full name and address of the writer. 



NOTES OF PROGRESS. 

Ancon Reservoir. 

The excavation for t':e new million-gallon 
reservoir on the east side of Ancon Hill is 
well under way. The inside dimensions of 
the reservoir will be 102 feet by 125 feet. It 
will have a concrete floor and reinforced 
concrete walls 13 feet high. A Decauville 
track is being laid up the hill from the road 
near the new Administration building, by 
which construction material will be taken to 
the reservoir. 



313 Cars in 370 Minutes. 

A record was made by 'shovel 253 at San 
Pablo on October 22, when 313 10-yard 
slump cars were loaded in 370 minutes, an 
average of one minute and eleven seconds per 
car. Assuming that the cars were loaded to 
their full capacity a cubic yard of material 
was placed on them every seven seconds. 
The onU' breaks in the day's work were oc- 
casioned by moving the shovel forward and 
cleaning the dipper. 

Impr »vements at Colon Hospital. 

A concrete floor is being laid in the kitchen 
of Colon hospital and the interior is being 
rearranged. A new refrigerating building, 
one-story high, is in course of erection 
in the rear of the kitchen. Like the rest of 
the building to which it is attached it pro- 
jects over the water of Limon Ba\', on con- 
crete piers resting on the coral reef. The 
floor will be of concrete, as will also be the 
floor of the veranda connecting the new 
building with the present one. .■\ new pan- 
try, with running water and a dumb waiter 
to connect with the dining room of the 
"gold" mess in the upper story, is also 
being built. 

The entrance to the hospital grounds has 
been moved 125 feet to the west and a new 
macadam road 20 feet wide will extend from 
end to end of the premises, a distance of 
about 1,700 feet, and [there otII be a con- 



crete sidewalk 5 feet wide on the south side 
of the road. The space between the road 
and the hospital buildings will be set in 
grass. House Xo. IS, a two-family house, 
has been removed from its old location be- 
tween houses 17 and 19 to a new site back of 
house 47 near the new thoroughfare known as 
Cocoanut alley. The old private stable at 
the corner of Second street and Cocoanut 
alley will shortly be moved and the site 
graded and enclosed by the new fence which 
will surround the hospital grounds. 

Dredge at Nombre de Dios. 

The 16-inch suction dredge, which made 
the fill for a corral on Folks River, and later 
underwent general repairs at Cristobal dry 
dock, was towed down the Atlantic coast 
last week to Xombre de Dios. The sand for 
the concrete work at Gatun is to be taken 
from this place, and the dredge will be used 
in pumping it from the banks into the scows. 
Nombre de Dios is in Panamanian territory, 
and an adjustment of the claims of the land- 
holders to the sand that \rA\ be taken is in 
progress. 

Nev7 Railroad Station at Colon. 

.\ new station has been authorized at Colon 
for the Panama railroad, and the work of 
construction will begin in the near future. 
It will be located on Front street, opposite 
Eighth street, about half wa^- between the 
present stations at Cristobal and Colon, both 
of which will be torn down as the new struc- 
ture will be the union station for the two 
towns. 

The building will be one-story hi,gh and 
constructed of concrete blocks. It will be 
30 feet wide and 450 feet long and the sta- 
tion platform will extend from Seventh street 
\o Eleventh street with numerous turnstiles 
for exits. The ticket oSice will be directly 
opposite Eighth street. The second-class 
waiting room and the baggage room will oc- 
cupy the south half of the building. The 
first-class waiting room will be in the north 
half of the building, together with the office 
of the cable company. The carriage stand will 
beat the north end of the platform. 

There are at present six tracks on the site 
of the proposed station, three of which will 
be taken up. Of the three tracks left two 
will be used for freight traffic to the railroad 
company's docks and one will be used for 
passenger trains, the latter to be enclosed 
by a fence from Seventh to Eleventh street. 

On the Obispo Diversion, 

It has been decided to complete the work 
on the Obispo Diversion by putting three 
steam shovels on the last large cut. The 
track from the Canal prism opposite Buena 
Vista and Haut Obispo up to the summit of 
the divide is almost completed, and steam 
shovel work will probably begin on the last 
large cut within the next three weeks. Before 
the Diversion channel, which will drain the 
water from the east side of Culebra Cut into 



the Chagres above Gamboa, is completed, a 
cut must lie made through a ridge whose low- 
est point on the line of the diversion is 93 feet 
above the bottom of the proposed channel. It 
is estimated that 400,000 cubic yards must 
be e.xcavated on the last mile of -this drain- 
age canal. .-Vn effort will be made to com- 
plete the work inside of eight months, or be- 
fore the next rainy season is well begun. 

Contracts for Supplies. 

Contracts will presently be offered for a 
six-months' supply of such articles and ma- 
terials as have become standard in the Canal 
work. The method now in use is to ask bids 
for a supply of one or more articles when the 
need becomes apparent, and up to the pres- 
ent time this method has been the most prac- 
ticable. 

Since the work has settled into a routine, 
however, and the division engineers know 
from experience the quantity of supplies that 
will be needed for any specified time, the 
method used for years in the .\rmy and 
Navy and in many private establishments, of 
contracting for a six-months' or a year's sup- 
ply has become the more economical. It is 
thought that lower prices can be procured on 
large contracts than on small ones, and it is 
known that the new method will do away 
with the expense of frequent advertising and 
of considerable clerical work in the Wash- 
ington office, and will insure prompt deliv- 
ery . 

At present, months frequently elapse be- 
tween the time when a requisition is made for 
supplies and their delivery on the Isthmus. 
It is proposed to make contracts for delivery 
of supplies needed between January 1 and 
Julv 1, 1909, on condition that the Commis- 
sion be allowed to take 25 per cent less than 
the amount contracted for or be furnished 
with 25 per cent more. Only a few months' 
supply will be carried on the Isthmus, as a 
cablegram to the States will procure delivery 
of any article at Colon in twenty days. .^ 
list of the standard supplies has been pre- 
pared by the Chief Quartermaster, and the 
division engineers are now preparing their 
estimates. 

Cristobal Cold Storage Plant 

A new unit for the Cristobal cold storage 
plant has been authorized, and it will prob- 
ably be installed within the next three 
months. It will have a compressing capacity 
of 150 tons, which, added to the present 
plant, will raise the capacity to 375 tons, and 
increase the efficiency 90 per cent. No in- 
crease in the size of the cold storage plant 
is contemplated at this time, the purpose of 
the new compressor being to relieve those 
now in service, and to act as auxiliary in 
case of a breakdown. 

The Panama Railroad Company announces 
that its regular Sunday night train from Pan- 
ama will leave at 10 o'clock accordin.g to 
schedule. 



66 



THE CANAL RECOKD 



THE ATLANTIC ENTRANCE. 

Progress of the Work from Gatun to Li- 
moti Bay. 

From the veranda of the Atlantic Division 
office building at Gatun one can look down 
the line on which the ships will sail to the 
Gatun L,ocks from Ivimon Bay and can get 
an idea of what the Canal in this section 
will look like when completed. Where the 
line pierces the Mindi hills the cut has been 
completed to sea level, and the steam shovels 
are carr\'ing the work below the level of the 
nearby water. Only a mile from where this 
cut is being made the Atlantic dredging 
fleet is carrying its channel into the land, 
the ladder and dipper dredges working near 
the shore, while the sea-going suction dredge 
Aiicon is making a deep water channel out 
to the point where the bay merges into the sea. 

From the appearance of the land border- 
ing Limon Bay it might be inferred that the 
channel of the Canal lies through a swamp. 
The dredges have found it quite otherwise, 
for they are working in earth which, al- 
though only a few feet above mean sea-level 
is very firm. Underneath this earth at vary- 
ing depths is a bed of blue rock, coming 
close to the surface in several places and in 
others lying ten feet or more below. The 
method of working in this material is to 
blast it with dynamite and then take it out 
bv ladder and dipper dredge. A battery of 
nine Star drills precedes the dredges, keep- 
ing far enough in advance not to retard 
the work. The bottom of the Canal from 
the bay to Gatun Locks is to be forty-one 
feet below sea-level, and, as the surface 
of the ground is from one to live feet above 
sea-level, the holes for the d\'namite are 
from 45 to .SO feet deep. They are sunk at 
15-foot intervals in the form known by 
powder men as "staggered," and are not 
"sprung" before the charge of dynamite is 
put in. At present 60 per cent dynamite is 
being used and the charge varies according 
to the depth of the hole in rock, the object 
being to shatter the rock. There was some 
doubt as to whether the rock could be broken 
into pieces small enough for the dredges to 
handle, but so far this method has proved 
entirely successful. The channel has al- 
ready been dug 1,000 feet into the bank the 
full width of .500 feet and the dredges are 
making a cut that varies in depth from 20 
to 40 feet. All the ladder and dipper dredges 
are working in rock, and although some 
large pieces are brought up nothing has been 
encountered so far that the dredges can not 
handle. 

Dredge \o. 6, one of the old French lad- 
der type, is working close to the bank. It 
is handling rock and the overlying strata of 
earth and is cutting to a depth of from 20 to 
30 feet. The dipper dredge Chagres is do- 
ing the most interesting class of work, be- 
cause it is taking rock up from 30 feet or 
more below sea-level. This dredge is cap- 
able of excavating to the full depth re- 
quired, 41 feet, and up to the present time 
the rock encountered has been broken into 
sufficiently- small pieces to be handled with- 
out much difficult)-. The Cliagres and 
dredge jVo. 6 are the ones w-orking farthest 
in toward land, following very closely 
on the heels of the powder men. As they 
advance they may strike harder rock and 
material more difficult to handle, .so that 
the cost can not fairlv be estimated, but at 



present they are handling blue rock shat- 
tered by dynamite at a cost of only 80 cents 
a cubic yard. 

Dredge .\'o. S5, new 20-inch suction, is "try- 
ing out" in the prism a few hundred yards 
back of dredge No.' 6, and is working in silt. 
.\s it has been at work only a few da^-s and 
has not yet "found itself" no fair idea can 
be obtained of its probable efficiency. The 
end of the pipe line rests on a small island 
near the mainland, several hundred yards 
away from the line of the channel. Behind 
this dredge is the old French ladder dredge 
.Vo. 1. and back of this the dipper dredge 
^fil!d^. The J\[indi is working in coral 
which has been broken by exploding dyna- 
mite on the surface of the rock in the man- 
ner known to powdermen as "bulldozing." 

The sea-going suction dredge A neon re- 
turned to its work of making the channel 
out to deep water on October 21, after having 
been at the Cristobal dry dock 18 working 
days for general repairs. The 20-inch suction 
dredge .\'o. S3, of this dredging fleet, is laid 
up for repairs and will probably not be in 
service again until January. h. defective 
casting in the pump broke about the first of 
October and the dredge can not return to 
work until the manufacturer has replaced it. 
The dredging record of the Atlantic fleet 
will be greatl}- reduced this month because 
of the loss of 18 days by the Ancon and the 
total loss of the service of dredge A'o. S3. 



Waiting for High Water. 

The two old French ladder dredges on the 
bank of the Chagres at Frijoles, and the 
one at Chagrecito, have been lowered to the 
level of the water in the river and are wait- 
ing for a flood to carry them down to Cris- 
tobal dry dock. .\ hawser has been run 
from each dredge to trees on the opposite 
bank of the river so that they may be drawn 
into the stream at the first high water. 



St, Mary's Church at Empire. 

The corner .stone of St, Mary's Protestant 
Episcopal church in Empire was laid on Sun- 
day afternoon, October 25, at 3 o'clock by 
Lieut. -Col. H. F. Hodges, U. S. A., Acting 
Chairman and Chief Engineer of the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission. Archdeacon H. B. 
Brj-an, one of the Commission chaplains,* 
conducted the services, and the executive 



committee was composed of J. E. B. Arm- 
strong, secretary; .\. S. Zinn, treasurer; E. 
B. Hartlev, W. B. Donsey, h. H. LeNoue, 
W. P.^Xeal. 

The new church is to be 26 feet wide, 64 
feet long, and to have a seating capacity of 
200 people. It is located in the center of 
the village, near the court house, on ground 
assigned by the Commission. The money 
needed to build it has been raised by private 
subscription in the Canal Zone and in the 
States. 

March E.xamlnatioti for Clerk. 

The Secretary of the Isthmian Civil Serv- 
ice Board has received the following letter 
from the President of the Civil Service Com- 
mission in Washington, under date of Octo- 
ber 8, 1908: 

sir: The Commission is in rt-ceipt of your letter of 
September 23. and in reply you are advi.sed that the 
rating of the March examination for Clerk in the 
Isthmian Canal -Service will be completed within a 
day or two, and the applicants notified as promptly 
as possible. 

The apparent delay in ratinii these papers is due 
to the very large number of applicants for all branches 
of the service during the winter and spring. Atone 
time there were on hand for rating over 40.000 sets of 
e.vamination papers, and with no corresponding in- 
crease in the force of examiners the Commission has 
been obliged to rate papers in the order required to 
meet the needs of the service. The surplus is being 
gradually reduced, and it is believed that within a 
short time the papers of ;dl competitors in tire recent 
examinations will be completed 



Trains on November Third. 

.\s November 3, Panama Independence 
Day, has been officially declared a holiday 
in the Canal Zone the Panama Railroad 
Company will operate a passenger train 
service on that day, approximately the same 
as was run on July 4, as published on page 
344 of Volume 1 of Thk Canai. Record, 
with the exception that transportation will 
be required on all trains. 

The average number of employes in the 
Mechanical Division in September was 2,381, 
as compared with 2,388 in August, and the 
amount of the pay-roll was *;iS6,579.82, as 
compared with $194,204.59 in /Vugust. 

Lincoln House, the new quarters for the 
men employes of the Panama Railroad 
Company in Colon, \w\\\ be opened the night 
of October 31 with a ball. The quarters are 
already occupied. 



VALUE OF FRENCH BUILDINGS. 



,A statement of the value of the buildings 
received from the new French Canal Corn- 
pan)- when the Americans took possession 
on May 4, 1904, is printed below. It is an 
estimate based on the appraised value of the 
buildings as received in 1904, plus the value 
of repairs, minus 10 per cent to cover de- 
preciation. 

In a statement prepared by the architect 



of the Commission the number of buildings 
tvirned over b)- the French to the Americans 
is given as 2,149, of which 1,536 were in 
use on August 1, 1908. The estimate does 
not include the value of the .Vdministration 
building in the city of Panama, formerly 
used as headquarters, nor the building also 
in the cit)- of Panama, now used as the 
American legation. 



1 — Quarters. Gold ' 

2 — Quarters, .Silver ' 

3— Hotels 

4 — Hospitals 

5 — Jails 

6 — School houses 

7 — Shops 

S — Storehouses 

9 — Structures 

10 — Miscellaneous buildings of old De- 
partment of Government and 
Sanit^ition 



Present 
"Value. 



E.XPENDED FOR REPAIRS. 



$1,024,712.14 

646,287.05 

27,131.40 

617.749.25 

21,900.00 

27,450.42 

119,862.27 

144.112.91 

123.823.36 



I,abor. 



I 



18,630.05 



S305. 828.60 
146.085.87 
16.478.69 
86,230.86 
7,082.51 
10,323.96 
5.819.42 
40.757.20 
35,995.60 



4.965.37 



Material. 



$93,399.91 I S399.228.51 



56,400.88 
3.197.48 

48.755.08 
1,314.15 
4.423.68 
3,842.00 
9,256.01 

10.609.56 



1,688.22 



202,486.75 

19,676.17 

134.985.94 

8,396.66 

14,747.64 

9.661.42 

.10,013.21 

46,605.16 



6.653.59 



Net value 
when re- 
ceived from 
French. 



Totals I $2,771,658.85 $659,568,08 1 $232,886,97 1 $892,455.05 



S625.4S3.6.1 

443,.S00.,10 
7,455.23 

4S2.763.31 
13,503.34 
12,702.78 

110,200.85 
94.099.70 
7''. 218.20 



11,976.46 



$1,879,203.80 



THE CANAL R'ECORD 



67 



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE. 

Women's Clubs and Other Features. 

The Cristobal Woman's Club held its reg- 
ular meeting- at the Commission clubhouse 
on Wednesday afternoon, October 21, at 3 
o'clock, the first vice-president, Mrs. S. 
Lewis Baker, in the chair. There was a 
short business meeting, at which the reports 
of the various departments were read. The 
meeting was then turned over to the home 
department, the chairman, Mrs. H. J. Slifer, 
reading a paper on essentials and non-essen- 
tials as related to the home and homemaker. 
The home department at its meetings dur- 
ing the season will consider a large number 
of practical subjects, including the making 
of tea and coffee, the evolution of the kitchen, 
a study of food values, and the esthetic side 
of home-making. 

A question box was opened, the questions 
submitted being read from the chair, and in- 
cluded cooking, cleaning of curtains, destruc- 
tion of insects and other tropical pests, and 
home decorations for Christmas. Replies 
were given to all of these from the floor. It 
is the intention of the department to reserve 
all the questions that are considered of gen- 
eral value and to publish them when a suffi- 
cient number have been obtained. Tea was 
served later, and the discussion of club work 
was carried on by the members informally 
during the social half hour. 

The "Willing Workers," the title given to 
the sewing circle for young girls, which 
meets ever}- Saturday from 3 to S at the 
home of the chairman of the educational de- 
partment, has a membership of fifteen, the 
girls ranging from seven to fourteen years 
of age. The class is not confined to the 
children of club members, but is open to all 
young girls who are interested in learning 
to sew. The work at present is hand sew- 
ing, overcasting, hemming, and the more 
advanced girls have begun hemstitching. 
The work of the class is not entirely con- 
fined to sewing. 

The scheduled meetings of the club for 
the season are as follows: Regular meet- 
ings, the first and third Wednesdays of 
each month; business meeting, every fourth 
Wednesday; home department, every second 
Monday-; educational, ever}- third Monday; 
art and literature, every fourth Monday. 
The philanthropy department has not yet ar- 
ranged its meetings. The board of mana- 
gers meet at the call of the president. The 
next meeting of the club will be the busi- 
ness meeting in the Commission clubhouse, 
on October 28, at 3 o'clock. The club is ar- 
ranging to give its annual concert some time 
in January. 

The Pedro Miguel Woman's Club met at 
the residence of the president, on Wednes- 
day, October 21, when the following chair- 
men of conmiittees were appointed to serve 
for the ensuing six months: Literature, Mrs. 
L. M. Vacher; home, Mrs. S. W. Jennings; 
social, Mrs. Mark White. The club gave a 
card party on Saturday evening, October 24, 
a small sum being charged to each player. 
Four prizes were given, the attendance was 
satisfactory and the evening was much en- 
joyed. Later a subscription dance will be 
given by the club. .\ play, in which Mad- 
ams Waters, Vacher, White, and Barnes 
will appear, is being rehearsed. Further 
entertainment will be furnished by the Bach- 
elors' Club, and preparation for a communit}' 



celebration of Christmas is under discussion. 
The Pedro Miguel Social and Recreative 
Club is arranging a Hallow-e'en party for 
the evening of October 31, and the Woman's 
Club has been asked to assist. 

The members of the Gatun Woman's Club 
met informally on Friday afternoon, Octo- 
ber 16, for a discussion of future plans. A 
study of Panama is contemplated. 

The .-^ncon Woman's Club held its meet- 
ing, October 21, at Hotel Tivoli, the pres- 
ident, Mrs. C. C. McCulloch, Jr., in the 
chair. The literary and educational depart- 
ment has decided to take up the study of 
Italy and Greece as outlined by the Bay View 
reading course. Regular meetings will be 
arranged later. The art department will 
studv the architecture, cathedrals, and ruins 
of Panama. The philanthropy department 
has arranged for monthl}' visits to the follow- 
ing institutions: Home for the Aged, Santa 
Tomas Hospital, and the San Bias Indian In- 
dustrial School in Panama; Ancon Hospital, 
and the leper colony at Palo Seco. Blank 
books are to be carried by each member on 
these visits, in which data regarding the in- 
stitutions ma\- be recorded and photographs 
kept for the individual interest. Special 
work is also planned for the leper colony at 
Christmas. The department work among 
the Panama bootblacks in the night school 
will be continued. 

The program committee of the club met 
at the residence of the chairman, Mrs. R. E. 
Noble, on Friday afternoon, October 23, 
when the schedule for the year was made 
out. The literary and educational depart- 
ments will meet at the residence of Mrs. H. 
C. Hanson, on Wednesday afternoon, Octo- 
ber 28, at 3 o'clock; subjects, "Current 
Event" and ".'Vn Afternoon in Rome." 

The Woman's Guild of St. Luke's Church 
will give a reception at Hotel Tivoli on 
Monday evening, November 2, from 8 to 10 
o'clock, to which all members of the con- 
gregation of the .\ncon Protestant chapel 
and residents of Ancon are cordially invited. 
The Guild's annual meeting will be held on 
the same day, at 3.30 in the afternoon, at 
the residence of Mrs. Bishop. A full num- 
ber was present at the reception given by 
the Guild on Monday, October 19, the after- 
noon being greatly enjoyed bj' the members 
and their guests. The Guild is arranging 
for a sale of cakes, to take place at the resi- 
dence of the chaplain later in the month. 

The Chorus Club of Gorgona is rehearsing 
to give an Old Folks' concert early in No- 
vember. This club, which was organized 
about two months ago, consists of about fif- 
teen members of the Y. M. C. A. and their 
wives. Rehearsals are held in the Commis- 
sion clubhouse every Monday evening, Mr. 
Jennings having charge of the work. The 
concert will consist of a program of old- 
fashioned songs, and will close with a med- 
ley of national songs and a tableau represent- 
ing "Way Down Upon theSuwanee River." 

The Gorgona Dancing Club gave a large 
dance recently and will give an old-fashioned 
dance and entertainment on All Hallow- 
e'en. 

Celebration of Christmas is being arranged 
by the American residents of Cristobal and 
Colon, the initiative having been taken by 
the Y. M. C. A., Woman's Club, and the 
public schools. It is planned to outdo the 
observance of last Christmas, and to this 
end an early start has been made, in order 



that such supplies as are necessary and are 
not available on the Isthmus may be pur- 
chased in the States. 

The Weslyan Methodist Missions in Pan- 
ama, Colon, and Empire have been holding 
mission meetings during the past week, a 
missionary from Costa Rica having come to 
the Isthmus for the purpose. The meetings 
have been well attended. Work on the 
church in Panama has been resumed, audits 
completion is expected within a short time. 



Opening of Panama National Tljeater. 

The new National Theater in the city of 
Panama was opened on the night of October 
22, with a performance of "Aida" by theLam- 
bardi Opera Company. In the audience that 
filled the theater were officials of the Gov- 
ernment of Panama, members of the diplo- 
matic corps, members of the Isthmian Canal 
Commission and mail}' Americans from 
various parts of the Canal Zone. The theater 
is in the new Government building which 
overlooks Panama Ba^', and which con- 
tains also the Panama government offices. 



Personal. 

Dr. A. B. Herrick and family and Judge 
S. E. Blackburn and family, of Ancon, 
sailed on the Advance, on October 19, for a 
visit of six weeks in the States. 

Among the passengers returning to the 
Isthmus on the Colon, which arrived at Cris- 
tobal on October 23, were: G. B. Strickler, 
Resident Engineer at Corozal, and Dr. W. E. 
Deeks, of Ancon Hospital. 

Maj. John L. Phillips and family. Judge 
H. A. Gudger and family, H. D. Reed and 
wife and Miss Gorgas, of Ancon, and R. 
Budd, and H. L. Stuntz of Colon, are pas- 
sengers on the Esperanza , due at Cristobal 
on October 28. 



Obituary. 

Information has been received of the death 
at Washington, on October 19, 1908, of 
William C. Eldridge, a.ssistant examiner of 
accounts of the Isthmian Canal Commission. 
Mr. Eldridge was appointed to that position 
on .August 15, 1907, after about twenty years' 
service in the ofEce of the .\uditor for the War 
Department. He came to the Isthmus on 
official business on the 21st of last Septem- 
ber, and returned to Washington on the 
Finance, sailing from Colon on October 8. 
He was taken sick on the wa\', and although 
his condition was not regarded as serious, he 
died four days after reaching home. No in- 
formation has been received as to the cause 
of death. 

Mr. Eldridge was exceptionally well fitted 
by experience for the duties of the office 
which he held. He was a faithful public 
servant and a man of excellent character. 

R. I. Richards, a conductor on the con- 
struction line of the Central Division, died 
at his home in Great Valley, N. Y., on Oc- 
tober 6. He was on his annual leave. Mr. 
Richards came to the Isthmus, October 16, 
1906, and his last place of residence here 
was Pedro Miguel. 



The remains of Samuel Brewster, the ne- 
gro laborer who was reported missing after 
the dynamite explosion at Mindi on October 
10, were found under some earth near the 
scene of the accident on October 14. 



68 



THE CANAL RECORD 



TRANSPORT ATIOS PROBLEM. 

Traffic Handled Daily Over Panama Rail- 
road and on Const|;uction Lines. 

The following letter has been received from 
the Hon. George A. Loud, a Representative 
in Congress from Michigan: 

I am very much interested in the work 
connected with the Canal, and I read every 
number of The Canal Record carefully as 
it comes to me each week. 

There is one subject, it seems to me, it 
would be desirable to present to the readers 
of The CAN.'iL Rfxord at your convenience, 
and that is an article pertaining to the 
amount of traffic handled over the Panama 
railroad. In giving some lectures upon the 
subject of the Panama Canal, one naturally 
refers to this being a very busy railroad, but 
just how busy it is, it is hard to show. There 
is a presumption that the material from the 
steam shovels, excavated in August (1,876,- 
515 cubic yards,) would give a daily average 
of 72,173 cubic yards. On the further pfe- 
sumption of 20 cubic yards to the carload 
and 17 cars to the train, it would give a daily 
average of 212 trains of spoil. Whether ail 
of this material comes out on the main line 
of the Panama railroad or not is a question, 
and if it does not all come out on the main 
line, then what is the average number of 
trains per da)'? 

In addition to the trainloads of spoil from 
the Canal excavation handled by the Panama 
railroad, there will be the regular traffic of 
the railroad and the incidental traffic of the 
Canal, made up of passenger, freight, spoil, 
work, and special trains. In all, how many 
trains are handled over the Panama railroad 
each day? It is obvious, of course, that the 
spoil from the Canal going to the different 
dumping grounds all passes over the railroad 
at different points. Then, one would like 
to ask how many trains do pass over the 
railroad at any given point in the eight 
working hours when the Canal work is in 
progress; also what number pass over a given 
point in the full twent_v-four hours of the day. 

These maj- be impossible questions to 
supph answers to, but they may lay the 
groundwork for an interesting resume along 
this line, which would be of interest to 
readers away from the Canal Zone. If it is 
obtainable, the average carload or trainload 
in cubic yards should be given. I have no- 
ticed in previous numbers of The Canal 
Record some fragmentary notes along this 
line, but nothing which seems to meet the 
desire which I have for a full and complete 
statement or estimate. 

Mr. H. J. Slifer, General Manager of the 
Panama railroad, supplies the following in- 
formation with regard to the traffic on that 
line: 

The train movement from the Canal work 
originates at three main outlets, viz: Pedro 
Miguel, Bridge 52, (near Bas Obispo), and 
Gatun, the Pacific Division dumps being 
located off the Panama railroad tracks at 
present. These trains are made up of sixteen 
20-yard cars each, except the rock trains from 
Bas Obispo to Gatun, which haul from 20 to 
24 cars per train. 

The average train movement passing Mir- 
aflores in the 8-hour working day is as fol- 
lows: 

Loaded spoil trains, south 80 

Empty spoil trains, north 80 

Labor, work and other I. C.'C. north 10 

I,abor. work and other I. C. C, south 10 

P.R.R. passengerand freight trains, south 5 
P.R.R. passenger and freight trains, north 5 

Total 190 

P. R. R. trains balance of the day of 24 
hours 16 

Grand total, 24 hours 206 



The maximum train movement at Mira- 
flores is 252 trains per day, all within 8 
hours except 16 Panama railroad trains. 

The average train movement between 
Bridge 52 and Tabernilla and Gatun is as 
follows for 8 hours: 

I. C. C. lo.tded trains, north 56 

1. C. C. empty trains, south 56 

I. C. C. work, labor and others, south 16 

I. C. C. work, labor and others, north 16 

P. R. R. trains, north 5 

P. R. R. trains, south 5 

Total 154 

P. R. R. trains bilance of 24 hours 16 

Grand total. 24 hours 170 

The maximum train movement between 

the points named above is 220. 

The average train movement between 

Mindi, Gatun and Tiger Hill is as follows 

for 8 hours: 

I. C. C. loaded trains, south 24 

I. C. C. empty trains, north 24 

I. C. C. work, labor and others, south 4 

I. C. C. work, labor and others, north 4 

P.R.R. trains, north 5 

P. R. R. trains, south 5 

Total 66 

P. R. R. trains balance of 24 hours 16 

Grand total, 24 hours 82 

The maximum train movement between 
the points named above is 102. 

Thus it will be seen there is a total average 
train movement over the Panama railroad in 
8 hours of 410 trains, or a total for 24 hours 
of 458 trains, and a maximum movement of 
574 in 24 hours, practically all of which is 
over double track. 

The average trainload is sixteen 20-yard 
cars. There are, however, a number of 12 
and 19-\ard cars and where the grades are 
steep, as at Spur No. 2, Gatun, the trainload 
is cut down to ten cars. 

There are in use some small French dump 
cars, but these do not run out on the Pan- 
ama railroad and are therefore no factor in 
the figures submitted. 

By official order published in The Cana£ 
Record of July 8, 1908, the car measure- 
ment of material is now based on the fol- 
lowing rating: 

Cu. Yds. 

Lidgerwood flats 20 

Large Western dumps (20 yds.) 17 

Small Western and Oliver dumps (12 yds.) 10 
French dumps 5 

Nearly all the spoil handled over the main 
line of the Panama railroad comes from 
Culebra Cut. An article "Transportation in 
Culebra Cut" was published in The Canal 
Record of August 12, 1908, which described 
conditions on an average day in the month 
of Julj', when the daily average of excava- 
tion was 55,427 cubic yards. This article, 
which filled almost a page is too long for 
citation here, but the following .statement 
of the number of trains and amount of ma- 
terial sent over the Panama railroad tracks 
on an average day in Jul)-, is compiled from it: 

North of summit near Culebra: 

58 trainsof 16. 20-yard cars 18.560 

15 trains of 25, 17-yard cars 6.375 

15 trains of 15. 10-yardcars 2,250 

South of sumtnit near Culebra: 

50 trains of 16, 20-yard cars 16,000 

6 trains of 30, 10-yardcars 1.800 

Total 44,985 

This statement is based on the average 
daily number of cars handled and the yard- 
age is in car measurement, which is usually 
less than place measurement. This factor, 
with the additional one that the excavation 



from the Obispo Diversion, about 1,000 
cubic yards daily in July, does not go on- 
to the Panama railroad, accounts for the 
apparent difference in the amount of ma- 
terial handled on the average day, which 
was 55,427 cubic yards place measurement, 
and only 44,985 cubic yards car measurement. 
. On an average day in September the exca- 
vation in the Central Division amounted to 
58,632 cubic \-ards place measurement. The 
amount that went over the Panama railroad 
tracks was as follows: 
North of Culebra: Cu. Yds. 

47'/2 trainsof 16, 20-yard cars 15.200 

5V2 trains of 20, 17-yard cars 1,870 

4 trains of 25. 17-yard cars 1,700 

Total 18.770 

South of Culebra: 
52I2 trains of 16, 20-yards car 16.800 

Total 35,570 

All the material handled does not go 
out on the main line of the Panama railroad. 
In September, of the 1,784,030 cubic yards of 
material handled by cars, that exca^•ated 
from the lock sites at Miraflores and Pedro 
Miguel, on the Obispo Diversion, from the 
Canal prism at Matachin, Santa Cruz, Cai- 
mito and San Pablo, and from the spillway 
at Gatun Dam, in all 551,519 cubic yards, 
was not handled on the Panama railroad 
tracks. At Miraflores the spoil is being used 
in the construction of dj-kes to hold dredged 
material and in the dam across Cocoli River. 
At Pedro Miguel Locks the material is 
dumped behind one of the hills alongside 
the lock site. The excavation from the 
Obispo Diversion is used in dykes on the 
Diversion channel. The dumps at Santa 
Cruz, Matachin, Caimito, and San Pablo are 
adjacent to the work, and the excavation 
from the spillwa}' at Gatun Dam is dumped 
on the toes of the dam. 

In the first week in October the Central 
Division began to use the Gamboa-Juan 
Grande trestles on the relocated line of the 
Panama railroad as a dumping ground. The 
dumps at Gorgona and Mamei have been 
closed, so that the onlj' spoil now hauled 
over the Panama railroad tracks north of 
Culebra is that used at Gatun Dam and 
wasted at Tabernilla and Culebra. The 
trains made up of 20-3'ard cars have 
been increased from 16 to 17 cars, and the 
average daily haul to Tabernilla in October 
is about 45 trains a da}', a total of 15,300 
cubic yards car measurement. The haul to 
Gatun continues as in September, namely, a 
daily average of four trains of twenty-five 
17-yard cars. The trains to Gamboa dumps 
average ten a day, and are composed of 25 
cars of 17 cubic yards capacit}'. By increas- 
ing the size of trains the number from the 
Central Division has been reduced by six 
trains daily. 

Sale of Commission Animals. 
The first general sale of condemned horses 
and mules held b}' the Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission was conducted at the Ancon and 
Cristobal corrals on the afternoon of October 
24. Six mules, two horses, five ponies and 
two colts at the Ancon corral, that had been 
condemned as unsuitable for use by the 
Commission, were sold at public auction to 
the highest bidder, the net proceeds being 
|778. The highest price paid was |100 for 
a mule, and the lowest was $15 for a pony. 
Two colts sold for jJ16 and $26. Some of the 
animals offered at auction were withdrawn 
as the bids made were not high enough to 
justify their sale. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



69 



COMPRESSEO AIR. 

Its Uses in Canal Work — The Compressor 
Plants. 

Compressed air is used in the Canal work 
as motive power in rock drilling and in run- 
ning tools of various kinds in the shops. 
One big system supplies air for the drills in 
Culebra Cut, at Pedro Miguel Locks, and 
Miraflores Locks, for the large shops at Em- 
pire, and the field repair shops along the Cut. 
Several small plants are located at conven- 
ient points on the Isthmus. Local con- 
ditions that affect the air compressing are 
the high percentage of moisture in the at- 
mosphere during eight months of the year, 
and the constantly high temperature. 

CUI.EBRA CUT SYSTEM. 

The system that supplies air to the rock 
drills in Culebra Cut and to the shops at 
Empire extends from a point about 800 feet 
south of the Chagres River at Bas Obispo to 
the newly erected field machine shop at Mira- 
flores Locks, a distance of approximately 13 
miles. It parallels the Canal several hun- 
dred feet back from the slope line, out of 
danger from slides or blasting. The main 
line is made up of 38,800 feet of 10-inch 
pipe, 14,600 feet of 8-inch, 10,000 feet of 
7-inch, and 4,000 feet of 6-inch pipe, a total 
of 67,400 feet of pipe. From the mains air 
is conveyed to various parts of the Cut by 
"leads," which aggregate over 34 miles, 
composed of 110,000 feet of 2-inch pipe, 
5,000 feet of 2%-inch, 9,000 feet of 3-inch, 
20,000 feet of 4-inch, 35,000 feet of 6-inch, 
600 feet of 8-ineh pipe. 

Air for this system is supplied by com- 
pressors at Rio Grande, Empire, and Las 
Cascadas. The first plant started was that 
at Rio Grande on June 29, 1906, where two 
Rand-type, noncoiidensing compressors were 
installed. The}' have duplex steam cylin- 
ders, 18 inches in diameter, 24-inch stroke; 
air C3-linders 18 and 29 inches in diameter, 
and 24-inch stroke, and the capacit}- of each 
compressor is 2,500 cubic feet of free air per 
minute. Steam was supplied from boilers 
taken from old dredges until the end of 
1907, when new boilers, purchased in the 
States, were installed. 

At the time the compressed air line along 
the Cut was begun, it had not been decided 
what type of canal would be built, and the 
locations of the plants were selected so that 
they would be adaptable to an\ type. While 
the Rio Grande plant was being built the 
main pipe-line was laid. Several months 
later work was begun on the Empire plant. 
Both the Rio Grande and Empire plants 
were completed before the Las Cascadas 
plant was begun. The line was extended 
along the Cut as far as Las Cascadas, and the 
demands on the system soon became so great 
that it was necessar)- not onlj- to establish a 
plant at that place, but also to double the ca- 
pacity of the Rio Grande and Empire plants. 

At present the Culebra Cut system consists 
of three plants, each equipped with two Rand 
and two Laidlaw-Dunn-Gordon compressors, 
with a total maximum output of 1,800,000 cu- 
bic feet of free air per hour. During the 
month of September, 315,081,000 cubic feet 
of air were compressed at these three plants. 
In August the output totaled 328,988,000 
cubic feet. To compress l.OOOcubic feet of 
free air to 105 pounds costs approximately 
4.89 cents. The fixed charges per day for 
the three plants are $65, and the cost per 



day for coal is $244. Oil-burning apparatus 
has been installed, and as soon as the plants 
begin to use oil as fuel the fixed charges 
per day will be reduced $21 a day, and the 
fuel charge |100 a day, making a total re- 
duction of $121 per day. 

I..\ BOCA PLANT. 

The La Boca air compressor plant is run 
in connection with the electric light plant 
at that place. There are two Laidlaw-Dunn- 
Gordon cross-compound, condensing, roll- 
ing-mill frame, two-stage compressors, the 
first stage compressing the air from atmos- 
pheric pressure to a pressure of 27 pounds, 
the second stage from 27 to 100 pounds. 
The high pressure steam cylinders are 16 
inches in diameter, and the low pressure 30 
inches; the low pressure air cylinders 30 
inches in diameter, and the high pressure 
18 inches. The stroke of each is 36 inches. 
The valve gear on these compressors is dif- 
ferent from that at Rio Grande, Empire, 
and Las Cascadas plants, those compressors 
having Me\-er valves, while La Boca plant 
has a Corliss valve gear. The capacity of 
each compressor, when running at 75 revolu- 
tions per minute, with a guaranteed steam 
consumption of 14'/2 pounds per indicated 
horse power hour, when a 26-inch vacuum 
is carried, is 2,200 cubic feet of free air per 
minute. The air from the compressors is 
delivered into two air receivers, 60 inches 
in diameter by 14 feet long. 

Previous to the installation of these com- 
pressors five Manning vertical boilers were 
used at the electric light plant, and it has 
been necessary to install in addition two 
Sterling type water-tube boilersof 234 boiler 
horse-power each, with superheaters, each 
superheater being capable of superheating 
steam 1.50 degrees at 150 pounds pres- 
sure. The steam header of these boilers has 
been connected with the steam main of the 
five Manning boilers, thereby making a total 
unit of seven boilers, although the Manning 
boilers will not be used in connection with 
the air compressor plant, except in cases of 
emergency. The boilers use crude oil as 
fuel, which is supplied from storage tanks 
located on a small hill in the rear of the 
plant. This is the only plant on the Isth- 
mus using superheated steam. 

An ffficient open t3'pe feed water heater 
is installed at this plant. The exhaust from 
the compressors is connected with the ex- 
haust line from the four electric units, one 
large Worthington surface condensor being 
used for the entire power plant. The com- 
pressors will be operated in conjunction with 
the electric light plant, no increase in force 
being necessarj-. It is expected that a very 
considerable reduction in cost of air over 
other plants on the Isthmus will be made be- 
cause of the high efKciencj- of ihe machines 
and the saving in fixed charges on account 
of combining the compressor plant with the 
electric power plant. 

Up to the present time there have been 
laid at La Boca one 8-inch air main 2,000 
feet in length, one 6-inch branch 500 feet 
long, and two 4-incli branches containing 
800 feet, or a total of 3,300 feet. The S-inch 
main conveys the air to the top of Sosa Hill, 
where connections will be made to the quarry 
that is to be opened for the purpose of fur- 
nishing rock for the concrete work at Mira- 
flores and Pedro Miguel.- From this point a 
6-inch main runs to the La Boca shipways 



and shops, supplying air for the various 
pneumatic tools in use there. 

At La Boca machine shop is a Chicago 
Pneumatic Tool Company compressor with a 
capacity of 1,200 cubic feet of free air a 
minute. This machine was installed before 
the large compressors at the La Boca power 
plant were erected and is now available for 
other service. 

PORTO BELLO. 

At Porto Bello one Laidlaw-Dunn-Gordon 
air compressor, having a capacity of 2,200 
cubic feet of free air per minute, and one 
Chicago Pneumatic Tool Company com- 
pressor, having a capacity of 1,200 cubic feet 
of free air per minute, are being erected. 
Both of these compressors are compound, 
condensing, two-stage. They are to be used 
in connection with the quarrying, which will 
be necessary to provide rock for the concrete 
for the locks and spillway at Gatun. Four 
Oswego-McNault water tube boilers are be- 
ing installed, to furnish steam for the com- 
pressors and other equipment. 
IN THE SHOPS. 

Empire shops, the shop at Pedro Miguel, 
and the field repair shops along Culebra 
Cut are supplied by the general air system 
that extends from Bas Obispo to Miraflores 
Locks. The shipways and machine shop at 
La Boca are supplied by the La Boca plant ; 
and Gorgona shops, the dry dock and ma- 
chine shop at Cristobal, and the Cristobal 
shops of the Panama Railroad Company are 
supplied by independent plants. The pneu- 
matic tools used in the shops may be claseed 
broadly as air drills, air hammers, and air 
hoists. 

Pneumatic drills are used in tapping, ream- 
ing and drilling holes in steel and iron 
plates, boilers, structural steel, etc., and 
also in boring holes of various sizes in all 
kinds of wood. There are in use on the 
Isthmus the "Little Giant" drills of various 
sizes, the "Thor" drills, Cleveland rotary 
breast drills, "Haeseler" drills, and Inger- 
soll-Sergeant drills. These tools are so con- 
structed as to drill with the smallest or 
largest drill now in use. In a recent test 
made at Gorgona shops, fifty- four holes 15- 
16 of an inch in diameter were drilled in 70 
minutes through %-inch boiler plates. To 
accomplish this by hand would require not 
less than eight hours. There are in use at 
the Gorgona shops 27 of these drills, 28 at 
at the Empire shops, 3 at the Las Cascadas 
engine house and shops, 3 at the Pedro Mi- 
guel engine house and shops, and 1 in the 
car repair shops at Buena Vista, also a large 
number at other shops and shipways on the 
Isthmus. 

Pneumatic hammers are used for the pur- 
pose of driving rivets of all sizes, chipping 
and caulking seams in boilers, beading flues, 
chipping castings, etc. The steel parts of 
the Gamboa bridge were put together bj' 
the use of these hammers. Many thousand 
feet of suction-dredge pipe have been built 
at the Gorgona shops by the use of these ham- 
mers, and likewise they have been used to 
great advantage in the erection of fuel oil 
tanksand water tanks. The kinds and makes 
of these tools in use on the Isthmus include 
the "Thor" chipping and rivetting ham- 
mers, "Boyer" hammers, "Haeseler" chip- 
pinghammers, "Imperial," "Monarch" and 
"Cleveland." These hammers varj' in size, 
and the number of strokes per minute runs 



70 



THE CANAL REC'.ORD 



frotn 1,800 for the smallest to 620 for the 
largest hammers. At the Gorgona shops 
there are in use 4S of these air hammers, 25 
at the Empire shops, 3 at Las Cascadas, 3 
at Pedro Mi.guel, and 2 at the car repair shop 
at Buena Vista. 

Pneumatic hoi.sts are used in different de- 
partments of the shops at Gorgona and Km- 
pire in handling heavy materials, such as 
large castings, repair parts for steam shovels, 
machinery, etc. Tliere are 16 motor-geared 
hoists and two straight-lift hoists in use at 
the Gorgona shop. .\t the Empire shops 
there are eight motor-geared hoists and 13 
straight-lift hoists. 

At the Gorgona shops there are two air 
compressors, one made by the Rand Drill 
Company, and the other by the Franklin 
Air Compressor Company. These compress- 
ors are used to furnish air for the variety of 
pneumatic tools used at the shops, and for 
air hoists. .\n old French traveling crane 
of twenty tons capacity has been equipped 
for some considerable time with air as its 
motive power. 

The Rand compressor is noncondensing. 
with duple.K steam cylinders, 2-stage air 
cylinders, and a capacity of 1,050 cubic feet 
of free air per minute. The steam cylin- 
ders are 14 inches in diameter, the high 
pressure air 13 inches, and the low pressure 
iZ inches. The air inlet valves are of the 
Corliss type, while the outlet are Poppet 
valves. The steam valves are of the Meyer 
type. The Franklin air compressor is non- 
condensing, with duplex steam cylinders, 
2-stage, with a capacity of 930 cubic feet of 
free air per minute. The steam cylinders 
are 14 inches in diameter, liigh pressure air 13 
inches, and low pressure Z2 inches, stroke 
16 inches. This compressor is also equipped 
with a Me\er valve gear on the steam cjl- 
inders. The air inlet and outlet valves are 
of the Poppet type. 

At the Cristobal shops of the Panama rail- 
road there are two Rand-type noncondens- 
ing, duplex steam cylinders, 2-stage air cyl- 
inder compres.sors, each having a capacity of 
1,050 cubic feet of free air per minute. Steam 
cylinders are 14 inches in diameter, high 
pressure air 13 inches, low pressure 22 
inches, stroke 20 inches. The Meyer type 
of valve is used on the steam cylinders. 
These compressors furnisli air for the various 
pneumatic tools used in the machine and 
))oiler shops. 

At Cristobal dry dock and marine shops 
a compressor, wMth a capacity of 1,200 cubic 
feet of free air a minute, furnishes air for 
the pneumatic tools used on the waj-s, at 
the dock, in the yard, and in the shops. 



Concert by the I. C. C. Band, 

HOTEI, TIVOU. .'^NCON, 
Sunda.v, Novemtjer 1. 190S. at 7.30 p. m.: 

PROGRAM. 

1 .Mnrch— TV;-- 0/ii Sail Hildreth 

2 Selection — Mill's Merry Mplodies Mills 

3 Intermezzo — After Sunset Pryor 

4 Waltz — Thousand and One Mights Strauss 

.S March Espagnole — Sorella Gallini 

6 Potpourri — The Sunny South Iximpe 

( a Charficteristic — Ruratistic Baelev 

7 /■ Schottische— (rA/-« a Hov Savs " irill 

I ro«;=" .Allen 

8 Overture — Four Ages of Man L<-ichner 

y Descriptive — Cavalry Charge I^uders 

10 March — Iron Regiment Marie 

Patiamaniau National Hymn. 
Star Spangled Banner. 

Chas. E. Jennings, Musical Director. 
A concert will be given at Bas Obispo, C. Z. , .Sun- 
day, November .S. 



Dedlcatlott Ball at Las Cascadas. 

Tim: Ca.vai. Ri:cori>: 

All members of the following organiza- 
tions and their families are cordially invited 
to attend the fraternal hall dedication ball 
to be given at Las Cascadas on October 31 , 
at S p. m. Xo special trains will be run, 
but visiting guests, both married and bach- 
elor, will be provided with f|uarters if the.\- 
will notify the secretary not later than Oc- 
tober 28. 

Masons, Knights of Pythias, Red Men, 
Kangaroos, Engineers, and Conductors. 
A. E. Weiss, 

.S<'( ;vY(7/;r, J,as Cascadas, C. /.. 

Purchase of Cold Storage Articles. 

In the followin,g table the net weight of 
cold stora.ge articles imported by the com- 
missary department from September 2 to 
October 25 is shown, together with the 
amount imported weekly: 

Total .4 ml. 

.Article. Ami. perick. 

Pounds. Pounds 

Beef, dre.ssed. SOO-pound hinds SS.356 11,0+5 

Beef, dre.ssed. enil-pound hinds 233,864 29,233 

Beef, dressed. 6no-pound fores 239,998 30.000 

Veal, carcas.ses 37.347 4,840 

Mutton. carca,s.ses 27,730 3.720 

I,.iuib, carc.as.ses 7.110 920 

Pork loins 15,438 2.000 

Sirloin butts 30,929 4,005 

Beef tenderloins 2,040 262 

Calves' livers 503 65 

Beef livers 3,796 490 

Beef ribs 11.533 1.4S0 

Sa usage — 

RolOk'ua 800 115 

Frankfurter 1,300 100 

I,ieberwurst 400 52 

Pork 4,625 600 

Poultry — 

Broilers 3,247 420 

Chickens, milk-fed 6,575 850 

Fowl 25,690 3.330 

Dairy Products — 

Butter, No, 2 prints 25,250 3,260 

Butter, tub 6,044 780 

Cheese, Camembert 50 8 

Cheese, Gouda 628 81 

Cheese, Italian 679 88 

Cheese, Neufchatel 525 68 

Cheese, Philadelphia Cream 204 27 

Cheese, Roquefort 100 13 

Cheese, Swiss 3,080 400 

Chce.se, YoimK America 8,152 1,030 

Cream, 10-gal, tins eallons 1,600 270 

Eggs, dozen 68,500 8,900 

Milk, 10-gal. tins gallons 6,30o 815 

Milk, quart-bottles quarts 1,500. 192 

Yeast pounds 2,800 362 

Fru its — 

.\pples 54.843 7,100 

Canteloupes 24,305 3,150 

Grapes 24,918 3,230 

Lemons 13,300 1,720 

Peaches 26,621 3,460 

Plums 1,900 246 

Pe,irs 8,850 1,440 

Watermelons 32,950 4,2.50 

/ 'e.i;etables — 

Beans. lyime. green...... 1.622 210 

Beets 11,039 1,470 

Cabbage 154,944 20,100 

Carrots 15,923 2,060 

Cauliflower 4,082 530 

Celery 11,760 1,520 

Cucumbers 11,668 1,525 

Corn, green 3,535 465 

Lettuce <'. 15,334 2,010 

Onions 70,845 9,160 

Par.snips 2,050 265 

Potatoes 844,330 109,445 

Squash 6,126 795 

Tomatoes 36,876 4,750 

Turnips 28,645 3,720 

Shellfish— 

Oysters gallons 100 100 

The steamship Karen sailed from Mobile, Ala., on 
October 15, with 703,000 feet B, M., of lumber, 60,000 
feet of which is foi stock, and the balance intended 
for car repairs at Gorgona. 



OFFICIALS OF REPUBLIC OF PANAMA 

President— J. I), de Obaldia. 

Secretary of Govennnent and Justice — Rani6n M. 
Valdes. 
Assistant .Secretary — Aizpuru Aizpuni 
Secretary of Foreign Affairs — J. A. Arango. 
Assistant Secretary- — J. ISI. I-'eruiindez. 
Secretary of Finance — Carlos A. Meudozji. 

Assistant Secretar.\ — Rodolpho Chiari. 
Secretary of Public \Corks— J. E. Lefevre. 

Assistant Secret.ir.v — Juan Navarro D. (temi'O- 
rarily in charge of the Secretar,\*ship i , 
Secretary of Public Instruction — FAlsebio A. {Morales. 
Assistant Secretary — Angel M. Herrera (tempo- 
rarily in ch:irge of the Secretaryship). 

Governors of Provinces. 

I'anam:! — Pedro A. Di.az. 

Mayor (Alcalde)— Fabio Al'osemena. 

Chief of Police— l.eonidas Pretelt. 
Colon — Porfirio Melendez. 

Mayor (.\lcaldet — Benigno Andri6n. 

Chief of Police — Ricardo Arango. 
Bocas del Toro — I.uis E. .\lfaro 
Veraguas— Adolfo J. FAbrega. 
Chiriqui — Antonio .Anguizola. 
l.os Santos— Mauricio Correa. 
Cocl*^— Eligio Ocana F. 



DIPLOMATIC CORPS. 

Ministers Accredited to Panama. 

United States— H. G. Squiers. 

(ieorge T. Weitzel, Secretary of Legation, 
Belgium — E- PoUet, residing in G\iatemala. 
Brazil — .\ntonio da Fontaura Xa\-ier. 

A. J. de Amaral Murtinho, Secretarj- of Lega- 
tion. 
Great Britjiin — Claude Coventry Mallet. 
Netherlands— J. II. Re us, resid ing in Caracas. 

Charge d'Affaires, 
France— Henri Arthur Marie Barr^-Ponsignon. 
Peru — Federico Alfonso Pezet. 

Alberto Bre-sani Rossel, Attache. 
Nicaragua — Federico Boyd. 

CONSULAR CORPS. 



Consuls Residing at Panama. 

fnited States— Arnold Shanklin, Consul-General 

(and in chargeof interestsof Greece and China). 

Felix Ehrman, Vice-Consul General. 

C. E. Guyant. Deputy Consul-General. 
Belgium — B. D. Fidanque. Consul. 

Morris B. Fidanque, in charge. 
Bolivia— Samuel Boyd, Consul-General. 
Brazil — Ramon Arias F.. Consul. 
Chili— Antonio B. Ag.acio, Consul-General, 

Juan Ehrman, Vice-Consul. 
Costa Rica— Luis Uribe, Consul. 
Cuba — J. Gabriel Duque, Consul. 
Denmark- J. L. MaJuro. Consul. 
Ecuador — Ramon Arias F., Consul. 

Pedro Arias F., Vice-Consul. 
France — L^on Hippeau, Vice-Consul. 
Germany — Arturo Kohijcke. Consul. 

Max Freundlicli. in charge. 
Great Britain — F. \V. Manners. Vice-Consul. 

E. S. Humber, Pro-Consul. 
Guatemala— Jose Fernando .Arango. Consul-General. 
Italy— Arturo Kohpcke. Consul. 

Lodo\-ico Delpiano, in charge, 
Mexico — Licenci.'ido Jose :\Iaria Aramendia, Consul. 

Baldomero Mendez, Vice-Consul. 
Netherlands- Dr. A. Jesurun. Jr.. Consul. 
Nicaragua — Dr. .Augusto S. Boyd, Vice-Consul. 
Norway — FMwin Hunter Melville. \'ice-Consul. 
Peru— Alberto B. de Obarrio, Consular Agent. 
Salvador — Federico Boyd. Consul-General. 

Flmesto A. Boyd. \'ice-Consul. 
San Domingo — Mauricio Fidanque, Consul. 
Spain— Juan Potous y Martinez, Consul. 

N. Perez-Petinto. Vice-Consul. 
Sweden— R. B. de St. Malo, Consul. 
Venezuela— Coronel S. McGill, Coivsul. 

Consuls Residing at Colon. 
tJnited States— Dr. J. C. Kellogg, Con.sul. 

J. M. Hyatt. Vice-consul. 
Belgium— C. H. R. Raven. Vice-Consul. 
Costa Rica— T. R. Cowan. Consul. 
DeiiTuark and Santo Domingo— Jos^ Maria Fidanque, 

Vice-Consul. 
Fi'ance — M. L"^on Huttinot, Vice-Consul. 
German,\ — L- Heuer. Vice-Consul. 
Great Britain— W. Andrews. .Acting Vice-Con.sul. 
Italy— Alfonso Lomonaso. Considar Agent, 
Mexico— -A. M. Rojas, Consul. 
Netherlands— E. J. Henriques. Consul. 
Nicaragua and Salvador— J. C. Steven.son. Consul. 
Norwa^ — H. B. Parker. Consul. 
Peru— A. D. Abello. Vice-Consul. 
Spain— E. Bastar. Consul. 



THE CANAL RECOKD 



71 



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS. 

Paaaman Independence Day. 

CULEBRA, C, Z., October 21, 190::^. 
Circular No. 219. 

Tuesday. November 3, 1908, the anniversary of the 
independence of the Republic of Panama, will be ob- 
served as a holiday in the Caual Zone. As far as pos- 
sible, all public work will be suspended on that day. 
• H. F Hodges, 
Achfig Chairman . 

Leaves of Absence. 

CuLEBRA. C. Z.. October 15. 190S. 
To THE Heads of Departments and Divisions; 

This office has been requested, in iininerous recent 
instances, to waive the rules coverinii leaves of ab- 
sence, in favor of emplo\-es who have been misled by 
•erroneous information given them by timekeepers, 
or .subordinate officials, and have thus allowed their 
leave to become forfeited. 

In future, no plea of ignorance of public rules, or 
of misunderstanding due to erroneous information, 
will be considered. 

As far as may be practicable, the heads of depart- 
ments and divisions will see that employes apply for 
their leave before it is forfeited, but this shall not re- 
lieve the indiWdual employe of the responsibility of 
protecting his own interests. 

Any case to which the application of the rules gov- 
erning leaves of absence may not be perfectlj- clear. 
should be referred to this office for decision. 

H. K. Hodges. 
Aciing Chairman . 

Accounting of Pees by Notaries PnbUc. 

Ancon, C. Z.. October 20. 190S. 
Circular No. S2. 
To all Notariei, Public of the Canal Zone: 

The following provisions of law respe ting the 
accounting of fees collected by notaries public in the 
Canal Zone are brought to the attention of notaries 
for their information and guidance: 

Sections S09 and S15 of the Code of Civil Procedure 
of the Canal Zone provide ns follows: 

Sec. 809. Lawful to Demand Sptcifc f-Ws Only. 
It shall be lawful for the clerk of the Supreme 
Court, the clerks of the Circuit Courts, referees, 
and commissioners appointed by the Circuit 
Courts, bailiffs, marshals, district judges, uotiries 
public, and other officers and persons liereinafter 
mentioned, together with their assistants and dep- 
uties, todemand. and receive, the hereinafter men- 
tioned fees and no more: but all fees collected by 
-officers drawing a regular salary or fixed compen- 
sation from the Government of the Canal Zone 
shall be paid into the treasury thereof. 

Sec. S15. Xotarits Public — Notaries public shall 
receive the following fees only for their ser\-ices: 
For protesting bill or note for non-acceptance or 
non-payment and giving notice, seventy-five cents; 
for registering such protest and making record, 
twenty-five cents; for attesting letters of attorney 
with seal, twenty-five cents: for notirial affida\-itto 
an account or other writing, with seal, twenty- 
five cents; for each oath or affirmation, with seal, 
twenty-five cents; for taking proof of debts to be sent 
abroad, twenty-five cents; for a certified copy of 
record and affidavit of its correctness, fifty cents; 
for writing depositions and affidavit, ten cents for 
each one hundred words; for taking proof or ac- 
knowledgment of any writing concerning real or 
personal estjile and certificate thereof for each 
party, twenty-five cents. 

Section S15 of the Code of Civil Procedure repeals 
Section 11 of Act No. 2 of the I^-iwsof the Canal Zone, 
fixing fees to be charged by notaries public. 

All notaries public who are regularly emplojed 
in the Department of Civil Administration, whether 
as circuit court clerks (ex-officio notaries public), 
district judges or in clerical capacities, must, under 
Section S09 quoted, account tu the Canal Zone for all 
fees collected by them; notaries public who are em- 
ployed in other departments of the Commission may 
retain fees collected by them subject to the provision 
of the following Executive Order; 

War Department, 
Washington. January 3, 1905, 
Orders: 

By direction of the President, the following or- 
der is issued for the information and guidance of 
all concerned: 

It is hereby ordered that hereafter no officer, 
clerk, or employe in the executive ser\-ice of the 
Government who is also a notary public, shall 
charge or receive any compensation whatever for 
performing any notarial act for an officer, clerk, or 
employe of the Government in liis official capac- 



ity, or in any matter in which the C.overnment is 
interested, or for any per.son when, in the case of 
such person, the act is performed during the hours 
of such notary's .service to the Government. Dis- 
obedience of this order shall be ground for imme- 
diate dismissal from the service. 

W.M. H. Taet. 
Secretary of (far. 

W.\R DEI'ARTMKNT. 

W.\shingtox, April 3. 1905 

OKDERS: 

War DepartmcTit orders of January 3, 19ii5. issued 
by direction of the President, prohibiting notarial 
charges by notaries public who are Government 
employes, is, by direction of the President, hereby 
amended by adding at the end thereof the follow- 
ing paragraph; 

"This order shall not apply to oaths of disinter- 
estedness, or other oaths required to be made by 
law, provided that the work in connection there- 
with is not performed during office hours." 

Wm. H. Takt. 
Secretary of IVai 

Jo c. S. Blackburn. 

Head of Department of Civil Administration. 

COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES. 

Activities of the Young Men's Christian 

Association. 

The Y. M. C. A. has arranged to receive the election 
returns by cable on election night. These returns 
will be transmitted direct to the four cUilihouses 
where they will be announced by bulletin and on a 
stereopticon screen as they are received. Interesting 
programs are being arranged by all the associations 
to occupy the early part of the evening and to fill in 
between bulletins until as late an hour ns the inter- 
est warrants. 

At Culebra there will be n smoker on the night of 
November 2, with suitable program, a feature of 
which will be the balloting for U. S. President and a 
Mayor of Culebra. On election night there will be 
moving pictures, the announcing of eleetion returns 
and the counting of ballots cast on the previous 
night. On the evening of November 4, there will be 
a "social" with a program of monologues, sketches 
and nnisic ;ind tJie announcing of any final election 
results not received the night before. l"ur refresh- 
ments, homemade cake will be provided by tlie 
ladies. The general public is invited to this gather- 
ing, as well as on election night. 

At Empire, the polls at the clubhouse will be 
open on election day from 11 a. m. to s p. m. and 
every man in Knipire is requested to cast his ballot 
for U. S. President and Mayor of Kmpire. The count- 
ing of these ballots will be a feature of the evening. 
The announcing of election returns will be inter- 
persed with music bj- the Marine ban<l from Camp 
KUiott. Both men and women are cordially invited. 

At Gorgona the early part of election evening will 
be given to voting for U. S. President and Mayor of 
Gorgona. The town has been dirided into three 
wards and there are four tickets in the field. Pri- 
maries will be held on theevening of October 31, and 
polls will be open from 6 to U.30. An entertain- 
ment program of local talent is being arranged for 
part of election evening. Refreshments will include 
cakes furnished by the ladies. The public is invited. 

At Cristobal there will be a band concert on the 
evening of November 2. and on election night the 
entertainment and excitement incident to receiving 
election returns will be supplemented by a program 
of local talent, as well as a local election. Furtherde- 
tails will be made known to the i)eople of Cristobal 
by special announcement. The general public is 
invited. 

On the day following election bulletins will be 
posted in all the clubhouses announcing any elec- 
tion results which maj- not liave lieen received the 
night before. 

The standing of the howling league on October 26 
was as follows ; 

Played. Won. I,ost. Per cent. 

Empire 57 36 21 .632 

Cristobal 57 35 22 .614 

Culebra 51 20 31 .392 

Gorgona 51 16 .15 .314 

CULEBRA. 

The indoor baseball team has recently won three 
games from Empire, the scores being 14 to 4, 
17 to .S and 2S to 13. The regular players on the 
team are George R. Herring, first base; Frank 
Roberts, second base ; I. H. Flei.schnian, third base ; 
Guy Ellis, catcher; E. C. Bath, pitcher ; Willis Hol- 
stead (captain) left field ; Albert Korsan. rifihl field. 
The next game will be played at Cristobal on Wednes- 



day. October 28. Plans are being di.scus.sed for an 
inter-association league, to Ije st^irted about Novem- 
ber 15. 

The work among the Juniors has been reorganized, 
and the regtilar practice afternoons will be Monday. 
Wednesday and Friday of each week. Ba.seball. ba-^- 
ketball. and bowling will be special features in ad- 
dition to the regular calisthenics. Athletic meets 
between the Juniors of the four associations on the 
Isthmus will be arranged during the dry season. On 
Saturday. October 31, the Culebra Juniors will goto 
Cristobal for an all-da\ meet with the Juniors there. 
Indoor baseball, bowling, high jump, sprint races 
and a relay race will be among the features of the 
day. 

Attention is called to nil tho.se interested in pho- 
tography that a dark-room has been provided in the 
Culebra clubhouse, and a club will be formed to pro- 
mote interest in photography. Reitular monthly ex- 
hibits of pictures will take place, and at the end of 
six months the member winning the highest number 
of votes will be aw.irded a suitable prize for his 
work. 

Twenty-five names have been handed to the secre- 
tary by members who wish to join the Choral Club. 
An organization will be effected in the near future. 

A tournament is in progress in both billiards and 
pool to decide on the players who will represent Cu- 
lebra in the inter-association matches to begin No- 
vember 7. 

A clothes pressing club will be in operation by No- 
vember 1 . 

EMPIRE. 
The medals for the winners in the recent duckpin 
tournament have arrived, and will be presented on 
the evening of November 3. 

The Empire bowlers defeated the Gorgona team in 
three straight games Saturday, October 24. on the 
Gorgona alleys. As the Cristobal team lost one of 
its games to Culebra on the same evening. Empire is 
now in first place in the bowling league. 

The standing of the pool tournament on October 
24 was as follows : 

Played, Won. l,ost. Percent. 

Duff.. S S lOOO 

Moeller ll u i yjj; 

Ruch 17 13 4 .764 

Pulsifer S 6 2 .750 

GORGONA. 
The gymnasium class has met five times since its 
reorganization with an average attendance of sixteen 
men, 

Saturday evening, October 24, the Culebra basket- 
ball team defeated the Gorgona team at Gorgona by 
a .shore of 40 to \S. This was Gorgona's first gnmc 
of the season. 

An a.ssociation "Sing" was held in the lobby on 
Sundaj'. October 25. A large crowd was present. 
CRISTOBAL. 
The "try-out" for the billiard and pool team to 
represent Cristobal in the Isthmian league is now on. 
The orchestra from the Prinz Joachim will give a 
concert on Monday. November 2. 

A committee is promoting the organization of a 
dramatic club, 

A vauderille show of local talent is scheduled for 
Thanksgiving Eve. 

Election night "open house " will be held until the 
returns are in — all night, if necessary. 

Thestandingin the individual bowling tournament 
October 21 was as follows ; 
Names — Played. Won. Lost. Pinfall. 

Robertson 9 9 1.535 

Morrill 9 8 1 1.329 

Strong 6 5 1 9S0 

Hembliug 9 7 2 1,310 

Gilmartiu 9 7 2 1,476 

Bnllard 9 6 3 1.432 

Scribner 9 5 4 1,434 

e: . Thomas 9 5 4 1 ,379 

McKinley 9 4 5 1.259 

Van Zant, 9 4 5 1.223 

Shipley 6 2 4 788 

Burdge 9 3 6 1 262 

Stickel 9 3 6 1.308 

Moyer 9 1 8 1,088 

Van Wagner 9 9 1,049 

Hertel 9 9 948 

The following steamers have recently arrived at I^ 
Boca: October 17, Prru . frotn Valparaiso; October 
20. Cccilf, from the north ; October 22. Qitito. from 
Gua.vaquil. Departures were : October 19. Ecuador. 
for Guayaquil ; October 20, Huasco, for Valparaiso ; 
October 2Z. City of Sydney, for Sau Francisco. 

The steamship .^tvMrt sailed from Gulfport. Miss., 
on October 15. with bin.nno feet B. M.. of lumber and 
193 piling. Five hundred and thirteen thousand feet 
of this lumber is for stock ; the balance for car re- 
pairs at Gorgona. A portion of the piling is for the 
new Cristobal wharf and part for relocation work. 



72 



THE CANAL RECORD 



COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT. 

VEGETABLES AND FRUITS. 

As the fresh vegetable season in the States 
is over the Subsistence Department expects 
to receive few vegetables other than the 
staples from this time forth. A shipment 
of cranberries is expected onthe /£sficj'a>!~a, 
which is due at Cristobal, October 28. Mal- 
aga grapes will be handled as long as they 
are in the market. 

The hours during which the various com- 
missaries are open for business are as fol- 
lows : 

Cristobal and Culebra, 8 a. ni. to 12.30 
p. m.; 2 p. m. to 7 p. m. 

All other commissaries, 8 a. m. to 1 p. m.; 
3 p. m. to 7 p. m. 



COMMISSARY PRICES 

For week beginnini? October 27: 

FRESH MEATS. 

Pricr. 

Mutton — Stewinji per lb 6 

Shoulder and neck (not under 

6 pounds) per lb 7 

Entire forequarter (not under 

10 pounds) per lb 8 

l,eK (3 to 10 pounds) per lb 16 

Short-cut chops per lb 22 

Lamb — Stewing per lb 6 

Entire forequarter per lb 8 

Leg (6 to 8 pounds) per lb 27 

Chops per lb 29 

Veal— Stewing per lb 10 

Entire forequarter (15 to 20 lbs).-.. per lb 11 

l,oin for roasting per lb 21 

Chops per lb 22 

Pork— Cuts per lb 20 

Beef— .Suet per lb 4 

Soup per lb 8 

Stew per lb 12 

Corned per lb., 12, 14, 16 

Pot roast ( from sirloin butt) per lb 17 

Rib-roast, second cut (not under 3 

pounds) per lb 19 

Rib-roast, short cut (not under iVi 

pounds! per lb 23 

Sirloin roast per lb 29 

Rump roast per lb 29 

Poi-terhou.se roast per lb 29 

Steak, round per lb 23 

Rib per lb 24 

Sirloin per lb 29 

Porterhouse per lb 29 

Rump per lb 29 

Tenderloin per lb 30 

MISCEJ.IvANEOUS. 

Livers— Beef per lb UV2 

Calf each 65 

Sausage— Pork per lb 19 

Leberwurst per lb 17 

Sweet bread— Veal each 1,20 

Ox tongues each 90 

Eggs, fresh dozen 34 

POULTRY AND GAME. 

Chicken.s — Capons each 2.40 

Broilers each 60 

Fowls, medium and large each, 80c, and 1.00 

Turkeys per lb 30 

Squabs each 45 

Sucklingpigs (whole) e,ach 3.50 

Suckling pigs (one-half) each 1.75 

CURED AND PICKLKD MEATS. 

Bacon— Strips per lb 23 

English, breakfast .sliced per lb §26 

Ham— Sugar-cured, .sliced per lb §25 

One-half, for boiling per lb §21 

Ferris per lb 20 

. Beef, salt, family per lb 16 

Salt pork per lb 13 

DAIRY PRODUCTS. 

Butter— Prints, prime quality per lb 35 

Cheese— Neufchatel each 6 

Young America per lb 22 

Swiss per lb 33 

Edam each 1.05 

McLaren's j.ar IS 

Pinxters tin 22 

Philadelphia Cream each 22 

French cheese in tins — Canienibert, Roque- 
fort, Brie, Neufchatel tin 20 



VEGETABLES AND FRUITS. 

Tomatoes (local only) per lb 8 

White potatoes per lb 3V2 

Sweet potatoes per lb 2V2 

Cabbage per lb 4 

Onions per lb 3V2 

Cucumbers per lb 25 

Squash (summer) per lb 3 

Beets * per lb 3 

Celery bunch 15 

Carrots per lb 3 

Turnips per lb 3 

Lemons dozen 24 

§ Sold only from cold-storage and not from Com- 
mis.s.aries. 

NEW ARTICLES. 

Pyi'ce. 

Jams, assorted, fruit, California, 8-lb tins.,.. .tin 63 

Catsup, "Griffon." quarts bottle 28 

Bonbons, chocolate, Cadbury's, V2S tin 25 

Tobacco, "Steam Shovel" pkge 7 

Bowls, soup each 60 

Boxes, bread, japanned — No. 5 each 50 

No. 4 each 60 

No. 3 each 70 

No, 2 each SO 

Shoes, mclder's f reprcof pair J2.65 

Buttons, pearl, 20-liue dozen 5 

Dresses, night each, $1.35 to 1.95 

Chemises e.ach, SI 10 and 1.60 

Ink, Carter's, No. 85, 2-oz. bottle bottle 5 

Rninfall, October 1 to 34, 1908, Inclusive. 

(midnight to mid.n-ight.) 

Maximum 
Stations. in Total. 

one day 

Ai! antic Division — 

Cristobal 2.35 5.74 

Brazos Brook 2.09 7,85 

Gatun 2.13 7.36 

Bohio 1.75 8..S0 

Central Division — 

Tabemilla 1.62 7.38 

San Pablo 1-23 7.05 

Bas Obispo 1.29 " 4.95 

Empire 1.40 5.69 

Camacho 124 5.23 

Culebra 1-56 4.85 

Rio Grande 132 4.48 

Pacific Division — 

Pedro Miguel 170 6.17 

La Boca 129 5,74 

Ancon 1.71 7-00 

V^Hr Chagres. 

Alh.a.iueln 3.01 8.5S 



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS. 



Stages of the Chagres. 

Maximum height of Chagres above low 
water for the week ending midnight, Oc- 
tober 24, 190S : 



Height of low water 
above mean sea 
level, feet 

Maximum height ab. 
low water, feet; 
.Sunday, Oct. 18.... 0.90 

Monday, Oct. 19 0.66 

Tuesdav, Oct. 20. ...I 1.28 
Wedu'sday, Oct. 21 2,70 
Thursday, Oct. 22. .| 2.70 

Friday, Oct. 23 1 2.50 

Saturday, Oct. 24...: 2.40 

Maximum for week..; 2.70 



1.52 
1.33 
1.80 
3.00 
2.73 
2.76 
2 "0 
3-00 



2.52, 
2.05 
2.90 
6.00 
5.33 
3.90 
4.00 
6,00 i 



5.90 
5.00 

8.25 
6.13 
9.05 
7.80 
S.30 
S.30 I 



1.85 
1.43 
1.30 
2.70 
4.07 
2.90 
3.21) 
4 07 



LEGAL NOTICE. 



Empire, C. Z., October 22, 1908. 
To any and all persons who may have any claim 
or claims against the estate of Philip F. Kramer, de- 
ceased, who met his death at the town of Paraiso. 
Canal Zone, on December 17, 1907 : You will present 
the same on or before the 1st day of December, 190.S, 
to Theodore C. Hinckley, administrator of the estate 
of P. F. Kramer, Panama, Panama, or E. M. Goolsb.v, 
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Empire, Canal Zone, 
properly verified, or the same will be forever barred 
according to law. 

Theo. C. Hinckley, 
Administratcr. 



The following is a list of the sailings of the Pan 
ama Railroad Steamship Company, of the Roj'al 
Mail Steam Packet Company, of the Hamburg- 
American Line, and of the United Fruit Company's 
Line, the Panama Railroad Company's dates being 
subject to change : 

FROM NEW YORK TO COLON. 

Finance rP. R. R.Tuesday Oct. 

Tagus R.-M Saturday Oct. 

Advance P. R. R.Monday Nov. 

Allianca P, R. R., Saturday Nov. 

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm,,.H.-A Saturday Nov. 

Colon P. R. R.Thursday .. ..Nov. 

Magdalena R.-M Saturday Nov. 



27 

31 

2 

7 

7 

12 
14 
17 
21 
23 
28 
28 
3 
5 



Panama P. R. R.Tuesday Nov. 

Prinz Joachi.n H.-A Saturday Nov. 

Finance P. R. R.Monday Nov. 

Orinoco R.-M Saturday Nov. 

Advance P. R. R.Saturday Nov. 

Allianca P. R. R.Thursday Dec. 

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm...H.-.\ Saturday Dec. 

Colon P. R. R.Tuesday Dec. 8 

Atrato R.-M .Saturday Dec. 12 

Panama P. R. R.Monday Dec. 14 

Finance P. R.R.Saturday Dec. 19 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Saturday . . . .Dec. 19 

Advance P. R.R.Thursday Dec. 24 

Trent R.-M Saturday Dec. 26 

Allianca P. R. R.Tuesday Dec. 29 

All the steamers of the Hamburg-American and 
Royal Mail lines call at Kingston enroute to Colon. 

FROM COLON TO NEW YORK 

Colon P. R. R.Thursday. ....Oct. 

Magdalena ' R.-M:. ...Tuesday Nov, 

Esperanza P. R. R.Tuesday. . . . .Nov. 

Finance P. R. R.Monday Nov, 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Tuesday Nov, 

Advance P. R. R.. Sunday Nov 

O.'inoco R.-M Tuesday . . . .Nov, 

AUian'. 1 P. R. R.Friday Nov 

Prinz Aug. \\'ilhelni...H.-.\ Tuesdaj' Nov 

Colon P. R. R.Wednesday ..Nov 



R.Monday Nov. 

M Tuesday ....Dec. 

R. .Sunday Dec. 

....Tuesda.v ....Dec. 

R.Friday Dec. 

....Tuesda.v ....Dec. 
R. R.Wednesday ,.Dec. 
R. K.Monday Dec. 



Panama P. R 

Atrato R 

Finance P. R. 

Prinz Joachim H.-A 

Advance P. R. 

Trent R.-M 

Allianca P. 

Colot\ P. 

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm..H.-M.. ...Tuesday ....Dec. 

Panama P. R. R.Sunday Dec, 

Tagus R.-M Tuesday Dec. 

Finance P. R. R.Friday Jan. 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Tuesday Jan. 

Advance P. R. R. Wednesday- ..Jau. 

Allianca P. R. R.Monday Jan. 

FROM NEW OKLK.VNS TO COLON. 

Parismina U.P'.C. Saturday Oct. 

Heredia U.F.C.. Saturday Nov. 

Cartago U.F.C... Saturday Nov. 



Parismina. 
Heredia 



.U.F.C. .Saturday Nov. 

.U.F.C. Saturday Nov. 



FROM COLON TO NEW OKLE.\NS. 

Cartago U.F.C. .Tuesday Nov, 

Parismina U.F.C. Tuesday Nov. 

Heredia U.F.C.Tuesday Nov. 

Cartago U.F.C.Tuesday Nov. 

Parismina U.F.C.Tuesday — Dec. 



29 

3 

3 

9 
10 
15 
17 
20 
24 
25 
30 

1 

6 

8 
11 
15 
16 
21 
21 
27 
99 

1 

5' 
6 
11 

31 
7 
14 
21 
28 

3 
10 
17 
24 

1 



. ,Nov. 
..Nov. 
, ,Dec 
..Dec. 
. ,Jan. 



10 
24 

S 
22 

5 



FROM COLON TO B.\RBADOS, CALLING AT TRINIDAD. 

Tagus R,-M Tuesday 

Magdalena R.-M Tuesday 

Orinoco R.-M Tuesday 

Atrato R.-M Tuesday 

Trent R.-M Tuesday 

FROM COLON TO NEW ORLEANS VIA KINGSTON, 

Mexican Leilaild Line about. .Oct. 31 

The Panama railroad steamships sail at 3 p. m 
from dock at Cristobal direct to New York. 

The Prinz steamers of the Hamburg-American line 
sail from Colon at 1 p. m. vi;i Kingston, Jamaica, 
for New York. 

All Royal Mail steamers mentioned above leave early 
in the morning from Colon ^-ia Kingston, Jamaica, 
for New York. .\11 mail and passen,gers should be 
on board early on day of sailing. 

The steamers of the United Fruit Company's line 
sail from New Orleans at 10 a. m. for Colon, calling 
at Puerto Barrios, and from Colon at 1.30 p.m., via 
Port Limon and Puerto Barrios, for New Orleans, 

Sailings of the French line (Cie. G^n^rale Trans- 
atlantique) for Venezuelan ports, Martinique and 
Guadeloupe on the 3d and 20th of each month. 



The steamship CecHe arrived at La Boca on October 
20, with 1,400.000 feet B. M., of lumberfor the Isth 
mian Canal Commission. 



CANAL 




RECORD 



Volume II. 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1908. 



No. 10. 



The Canal Record 



Published weekly under the authority and supervision of the 
ISTHMIAN CANAL COMMISSION 



"The Canal Record"" is issued free of charge, one 
copy each, to all employes of the Commission and Pan- 
ama Railroad Company whose names areo?i the" sold"' 
roll. Extra copies can be obtained from the ne7is 
stands ef tlie Panama Railtoad Company for five cents 
each 



Address all Communications 

THE CANAL RECORD 

Ancon, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama. 

No communication . either for publication or request- 
insr infor^iaiion. will receive atte^ition unless signed 
with the full name and address oj the writer. 

NOTES OF PROGRESS. 

October Hxcavation. 

The grand total of excavation during the 
month of October was 3,224,638 cubic yards, 
the highest record for rainy-season excava- 
tion. All of this except 111,075 cubic yards 
was taken from the Canal prism. This is 
65,752 cubic yards more than the record for 
September, and 255,632 cubic yards less than 
the highest record, that of March, 1908. 
There were 27 working days in October, two 
more than in September and one more than 
in March. Of the grand total for October, 
1,271,136 cubic yards were taken out by 
dredges, and the remainder was dry exca- 
vation. The average rainfall for October 
for the territory in which excavation is in 
progress was 10.51 inches, as compared with 
9.72 inches in September. 

The excavation for October, 1908, as com- 
pared with that for the same month in 1907, 
when the work was less thoroughly devel- 
oped, was about 60 per cent greater. A com- 
parison of the amounts excavated from the 
prism of the Canal in the months already 
referred to shows: 

Cubic yards. 

October. 1907 1,844,471 

March, 1908 3,205,076 

September, 1908 3,089,851 

October, 1908 3,113,563 

111 the Atlantic Division the October rec- 
ord was kept below that of the four preced- 
ing months by the loss of the services of the 
sea-going suction dredge Aiicon, which was 
undergoing general repairs during 18 work- 
ing days. The dredges took out 505,260 cu- 
bic yards, as compared with 624,776 cubic 
yards in September, 638,217 in August, 
which is the high record, and 625,497 in 
July. Of the drj- excavation in this division, 
155,142 cubic yards were taken from the Ca- 
nal prism, 109,667 of which was from the lock 
site. 

The Central Division broke all previous 



records for excavation from the Canal prism. 
A comparision for the excavation in this ter- 
ritory, including Culebra Cut and the old 
Chagres Division, in the prism, shows: 

Cubic yardi\ 

March, 190S 1,541,637 

September. 1908 1.442.567 

October, 190S 1,551,409 

In the Culebra section, known as Culebra 
Cut, the excavation amounted to 1,168,281 
cubic yards, of which 33,603 cubic yards 
were from the Obispo Diversion, and 8,180 
cubic yards from accessory works at Pedro 
Miguel. The excavation in the Chagres sec- 
tion was 62,017 cubic yards greater than tlie 
best previous record, that of Au,gust. 

All previous records in the territory of 
the Pacific Division were broken by an exca- 
vation of 903,436 cubicyards. This is 17,236 
cubic 3-ards greater than the previous high 
record, that of September. Of the total, 
the dredges took out 765,876 cubic yards, 
wh'cliis 17,405 cubicyards less than the rec- 
ord for March. One of the dredges was 
laid up a week for repairs, and during a 
part of the mouth the material was not so 
easily handled, as it had been in previous 
months. On the other hand, the fleet was 
strengthened b}' a new 20-inch suction 
dredge, which excavated 24,593 cubic yards 
from the lock site at Miraflores. 

A detailed statement of the excavation in 
the three divisions follows: 

.\TLANTIC DIVISION. 



TOT.'VL EXCAVATION, ENTIRE CANAI,. 



Locality. 


Frora 
Canal 
Prism 


Outside 

Caniil 
Prism 

cu. yds. 

44,397 
17,422 


Total 
excava- 
tion 


£>^y excavation— 
Gitun spill wiy 


cu. yds. 


(•;/. yds. 
44,397 




109,667 
45,475 


127,089 




45,47.s 








Total 


155, 14 J 
505,260 


61,819 


216,961 


JVf t excavation — 


505 260 








Total 


505,260 




505 260 








Total wet and dry 


660.402 


61,819 


722,221 







CENTRAL DIVISION. 



All dry excavation — 

Chagres section 

Culebra section 


424,911 
1,126,498 


5,789 
41,783 


430,700 
1,168,281 


Total 


1,551,409 


47.572 


1,598.981 











PACIFIC DIVISION. 



Dry ^.rcavation — 

^liraflores Locks 

Pedro Mieuel Locks.... 


71 ,201 
47,188 
17,487 


497 
1,187 


71,698 
48,375 
17,487 








Total 


135,876 

741,283 
24,593 


1,684 


137,560 


IVct cvcavatioti — 


741.2S3 


Miraflores Locks 


. . . 


24,593 






Tot,al 


765,876 




765,876 








Total wet and dry 
excavation 


901,752 


1,684 


903,436 



Dry excavation . 
Wet excavation . 



1,842,427 
1.271,136 



111,075 



Total I 3,113,563 1 111,075 



1,953,502 
1,271,136 



3,224,638 



Mean rainfall alone Canal (eleven stations), 10.51 
inches. 

Figures of monthly excavation are based 
upon telephone reports from the Division 
Engineers, and are subject to .slight alter- 
ations when the official reports are received. 

Vegetable and Flower Seeds. 

The Isthmian Canal Commission has made 
arrangements with the Department of Agri- 
culture at Washington to have a selected 
assortment of ve.getable and flower seeds 
sent to the Isthmus. The shipment will 
consist of 500 packages of vegetable, and 
250 packages of flower seed, each package 
containing five small packets of different 
varieties. 

The seed is for free distribution in the Canal 
Zone and only seeds of plants that experience 
has shown to be suitable for cultivation on 
the Isthmus will be sent. They are expected 
to be shipped from the States the latter part 
of November. The distribution will be 
made by the horticulturist of the Commis- 
sion, under the direction of the Chief Quar- 
termaster. 

October Rainfall for Two Years. 



Stations — 

Atlantic Division— 

Cristobal 

Brazos Brook 

Gatun 

Bohio 

Central Division — 

Tabemilla 

San Pablo 

Has Obispo 

Gamboa 

Empire 

Camacho 

Culebra 

Rio Grande 

Fac ific Division — 

Pedro ISIiguel 

La Boca 

Ancon 

Ut>t>er Chagres— 

Alhajuela 

Porto Bello 



21.99 
18,42 
19.27 
19.00 

26.46 
18.94 
13.62 
13.02 
15.44 
15..SS 
15.27 
15.09 



Average No. 
1908, since sta. of rainy 
estab"h'd. days. 

10.96 13.98 22 

11.95 13.59 22 

12.22 17.47 25 

14.25 16.98 26 



14.57 
12.95 
8,30 



8.87 
6.81 
9.03 
S.59 



20.52 
15.94 
11.25 
12.73 
12.83 
10.25 
10.93 
11.38 



10.18 
9.26 



8.41 

7.51 8.83 

8.79 10,70 



21 

23 

24 

24 
22 
25 



20 
17 
20 



15.09 
13.18 



12.77 



.\t T.ibernilla, on the 29th, 2.59 inches in one hour. 
.At San Pablo, on the 29th, 3.10 inches in one hour. 



Small Slide at Whitehouse. 

A small slide has developed on the east 
side of Culebra Cut opposite Whitehouse, and 
although it is giving no trouble at present it 
is believed that continuous rains would re- 
sult in washing most of the material into 
the Cut. The amount of material affected is 
estimated at from fifty thousand to one hun- 
dred thousand cubic yards. The slide is simi- 
lar to that at Culebra and not comparable in 
amount with the Cucaracha and Paraiso 
slides. 

The highest average record for one day by 
the steam shovels of the Central Division 
was made on October 28, when 49 shovels 
excavated 62,396 cubic yards of material. 



74 



THE CANAL RECORD 



CARE IN USE OF DYNAMITE. 

Meeting of Steam Shovel and Powder Men 
of Central Division. 

Ninety steam shovel and powder men of the 
Central Division met the Division Engineer 
and Assistant Division Engineer in Kan- 
garoos Hall, at Empire, Sunday afternoon, 
November 1, for the purpose of discussing 
what additional means may be taken to 
guard against danger in the handling and 
use of dynamite. The meeting was called at 
the request of some of the steam shovel men 
and was the immediate outcome of the ex- 
plosion which occurred in the Cut, near Em- 
pire, on October 8. Fifteen of the men, rep- 
resenting both the powder men and steam 
shovel men, offered suggestions, all of which 
have been taken under advisement by the 
Division Engineer. 

In opening the meeting the Division En- 
gineer .said that he wished to thank the men 
in his own behalf and that of the .Assistant 
"Division Engineer for the interest evinced by 
their presence. This interest he assured 
them was reciprocal, because careless han- 
dling of dynamite in the Cut is a men- 
ace not alone to the powder men and the 
steam shovel men and their helpers, but 
to everyone who works in the Cut. He 
urged upon them the need for cooperation 
in order to lessen the danger and assured 
them that the Isthmian Canal Commission 
and the Government consider the ques- 
tion of yardage a secondar)- one to that of 
the safety of the men. 

The conditions on the Isthmus are pe- 
culiar ; in the first place, because of the 
mijiituda of the work necessititins: ths 
handling in the Central Division of 700,000 
pounds of dynamite and the exploding 
of 260,088 feet of holes each month; 
in the second place, because the mate- 
rial being excavated is not uniform, and 
the powder man and steam shovel man 
find themselves handling the hardest rock 
one hour, while the next hour they are likely 
to be working in earth or clay. These con- 
ditions should be a reason for greater cau- 
tion on the part of the men, and it is ad- 
visable, therefore, that each steam shovel 
man take it upon himself to examine closely 
the work he is called upon to do. No 
one knows better than the steam shovel 
men who are working in the Cut day 
after day, and have been working there 
for months and years, when it is advisable 
to slow down in the work of excavation in 
order to proceed with safet)'. 

In addition to the precautions already 
taken, the Commission has cabled for fifteen 
galvanometers, to beused in testing the fuzes, 
and for forty-eight additional Star drills. 
The galvanometers, added to those already 
in use, will make the number twenty-five 
for the Central Division, and each powder 
man in the Cut will be supplied with one. 
It will be his duty to test each fuze before 
it is placed in the dynamite cartridge ; to test 
it after the hole is loaded; and finally, when 
wires have been strung to the battery, to 
test the circuit again in order to see that the 
current will enter every fuze. This will in- 
sure against defective fuzes. In order to 
fire charges which may escape explosion 
when the current from the battery is 
turned on, holes will be drilled twelve 
feet apart, after the arrival of the extra 
drills, instead of twenty feet, as is usual 



at present, and thus each hole will be so close 
to its neighbor that, even though one of them 
should not explode when the current is 
applied, the detonation from the nearby hole 
will set off the charge of dynamite. There 
is now under consideration apian to have a 
high-power live wire strung along the edge of 
the Cut from Pedro Miguel to the Chagres 
River, from which leads will be run at regu- 
lar intervals intotlie Cut for the purpose of 
furnishing current to be used in exploding 
fuzes. There are both advantages and dis- 
advantages to be considered in connection 
with this plan, but neither cost nor con- 
venience will be allowed to weigh against 
the installation of a high-power electric 
line, if it is decided that the safety of the 
men at work in the Cut would be in- 
creased by the use of such a current in 
exploding the dynamite. 

But all the precaution that the Commission 
may take will be futile if the men them- 
selves do not assist. No workman should 
do any work that he knows will prejudice 
the safety of himself or his fellow workmen, 
even if his refusal involves a disobedience 
of orders. The question of disobedience can 
be taken up with the Division Engineer or 
theAssistaut Division Engineer, either at the 
office or when they are on the work, as they 
are every day. The question of discipline, im- 
portant though it be, will always be held 
secondary to that of the safety of the men. 

After the ideas condensed in the above had 
been presented to the men by the Division 
Engineer and the Assistant Division Engi- 
neer, the men were asked to give their views. 
It appeared that the action of the Commis- 
sion in ordering galvanometers and more 
drills had anticipated the chief suggestions 
that the men had to make, and the matter 
of installing a high-power electric line for 
use in exploding the dynamite was received 
with favor. It was suggested that greater 
care be enjoined on the powder men in keep- 
ing their batteries dry, in accounting for 
all unused dynamite and fuzes, and in giv- 
ing timely warning when a blast is about to 
be set off or dobying is to be done. It is 
the custom of the pitmen to take refuge 
under the dump cars when a doby is about 
to be made, and attention was called to the 
carelessness of some of the train crews in 
not giving sufficient warning when a spoil 
train is about to start, so as to allow the men 
who have taken refuge uiuler the cars to 
crawl out before the train starts. Steam 
shovel men were warned not to dig oflt dj-- 
namite and to take suflicient time to make 
sure that material in which they are work- 
ing is free from uuexploded charges. The 
men were told that their efforts to make 
big records should not be allowed to jeopard- 
ize their own safety and that of the men 
under them. 

It was the consensus of opinion that the 
greatest danger run by the steam shovel men 



and their helpers comes from the digging up 
of uuexploded dynamite. It is almost im- 
possible to keep count of the number of 
holes that explode in a charge of from twenty 
to fifty holes and the steam shovels not in- 
frequently dig up dynamite that has not ex- 
ploded. Some question was raised as to the 
quality of the dynamite, and this was ans- 
wered by the statement that every shipment 
of dynamite received by the Commission un- 
der its new contract is tested by the United 
States Testing Bureau, and that it has been 
uniformly up to the standard contracted for. 
It is fresh, unlike some of the dynamite used 
in the Cut a j-ear or more ago. Almost invari- 
ably the trouble lies in the fuzes, which are 
so constructed that the platinum bridge in 
them which completes the circuit is liable to 
be broken, and the fuze is thus prevented 
from exploding, with the result that the 
dj-namite charge is not set off. The princi- 
pal danger lies in the steam shovels dig- 
ging into one of these fuzes and setting off 
the charge of dynamite. These fuzes are 
tested before they are shipped from the 
United States, and are tested again on reach- 
ing the Isthmus. Hereafter they will be 
tested three times before tl;e exploding cur- 
rent is turned into them, and the number of 
missfires will thus be reduced to a minimum. 
Most of the matters discussed have been 
treated in official circulars, talked over time 
and again, and have been incorporated in 
the rules for handling explosives. The 
men were assured, however, that all their 
suggestions will be taken up at once and 
that with their help the rules alreadj- laid 
down and those about to be made will be 
strictly enforced. Further meetings will be 
held whenever the men desire, and mean- 
while, the men were requested to make 
known any complaints they might have 
individually to the Division Engineer or 
Assistant Division Engineer. 



Supplies for Pacific Fleet. 

The Subsistence Department of the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission has made arrange- 
ments with the United States Navy Depart- 
ment to supply 175,000 pounds of fresh 
meat, 150,000 pounds of potatoes, and 30,000 
pounds of other fresh vegetables, to the 
vessels of the Pacific fleet that are expected 
to be at Panama between December 12 and 12. 



Ne^ro Boy Drovrned at Matachin. 

Friday afternoon the ferry across the Chag- 
res River at Matachin was overturned in 
midstream and four men and a boy on it 
were thrown into the water. The men 
reached shore safely, and one of them car- 
ried the boy with him. On reaching the 
bank, however, it was found that the boy 
had drowned. He was a negro messenger, 
named Maxile Benjamin, and was 14 years 
old 



WEATHER CONDITIONS, 


CANAL ZONE, OCTOBER, 1908. 










a-* 

a; o 

ill 

0. 


Temperature. 




Precipitation. 


1 Wind. 


Stations. 


s 
s 

79 
77 
79 


B 

3 

s 

n 

90 
S7 
92 


V 


i 

s 

'S 

g 


ii 

a 


S 


Is 


^- • 

3 aS 


Total move- 
ment (.in 
miles.) 


.11 


s 


ti 

s 




29.HS 
29.56 
29.S5 


6 
23 
21 


70 
66 
69 


26 
26 
26 


90 
94 
88 


10.96 
8.30 
8.79 


22 
24 
20 


13.98 
11.25 
10.70 


5.054 
3..100 
5,246 


s.e. 
s.e. 

n.w 


31 
25 
37 


17 






Ancon 


16 



THE CANAL RECORD 



75 



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE. 

■Women's Clubs and Other Features. 

The Culebra and Gatun Women's Clubs 
will meet on Thursday and Friday, Novem- 
ber 5 and 6, respectively for the purpose of 
electing officers for the ensuing year. 

The Cristobal Woman's Club t eld its regu- 
lar business meeting on Wednesday, Octo- 
ber 28, the preparation for the Christmas 
celebration being taken up. The art and 
literature department commenced Shakes- 
peare's study at its regular meeting, Monday, 
October 26. The class was led by Mrs. 
Claude C. Pierce. 

The Cristobal Juvenile Library was opened 
on Tuesday, October 20. under the auspices 
of the educational department of the Wom- 
an's Club. The one hundred and fiity vol- 
umes which are placed in the study of the 
Union Church building, comprise a selec- 
tion of standard juvenile literature, and in- 
clude also twelve voluraesof Dickens' works 
and some of Irving, Oeorge Eliot and 
Charles Kingsley. The library is open on 
Tuesday and Friday afternoons from 3,30 to 
5 o'clock; a member of the educational de- 
partment being in charge during these hours. 
A deposit of 75 cents is required in order to 
take books from the building; this consti- 
tutes membership, and is returned on re- 
moval of the member or in case he wishes to 
discontinue using the library. The Juvenile 
Library is the result of the combined efforts 
of the school, the Union Church and the 
Woman's Club, an entertainment having 
been given last year by these three organi- 
zations for the purpose of raising funds. 

Cristobal has two organized whist clubs 
among the women which meet on alternate 
Thursdays. Both of these are the outcome 
of the club organized in the Woman's Club 
last year for the purpose of raising funds to 
assist the philanthropy department in the 
work which it was desirous of taking up. 
There are about twelve members in each 
club. 

The Union Church gave a dance and Hol- 
low-e'en entertainment in the church build- 
ing on Fridaj- evening, October 30. The 
hall was decorated with palms and the even- 
ing was much enjoyed. 

The staff of the Colon hospital gave a cos- 
tumeball on the evening of All Hollow-e'en. 
The Kangaroos gave a large Hollow-e'en 
dance at Paraiso on Saturdaj' evening. A 
large number of people from the line wjere 
present. 

The Ancon Woman's Club is making 
elaborate preparations for the bazaar which 
will be given the first week in December. 
It is proposed to hold the sale on two after- 
noons and evenings. Each department will 
be responsible for a booth, and there will be 
many outside attractions. It is intended 
that the sale shall include many practical 
and desirable articles for Christmas gifts. 
The educational and literarj- department of 
the club met on October 28, the afternoon 
being spent in study in preparation for the 
course on Italy and Greece. The depart- 
ment \.ill meet on the second and fourth 
Wednesday of each month at the residence 
of the members. .\t the ne.xt meeting the 
epic poems of Greece and Rome and their 
m3'thology will be taken up. 

The general programs of the club will be 
devoted exclusively to Panama, the next 
three meetings being scheduled as follows: 



November 4, the San Bias Indians, program 
under the philanthropy department; Novem- 
ber 18, a general survey of the history of 
Panama, under the philanthropy depart- 
ment; December 2. native dishes and how 
to prepare them, under the home depart- 
ment; an exhibit of native needlework and 
dress by the art department on the after- 
noon of December 16. The meetings will all 
begin promptly on time and will be held in 
the sun pirlor of the Hotel Tivoli. By ac- 
tion of the executive board the club has 
donated a sum of money to the Palo Seco 
colony for the purchase of fireworks for the 
celebration of the national holidays this 
week. 

The annual meeting of St. Luke's Guild 
took place on Monday afternoon at the resi- 
dence of Mrs. Bishop in Ancon. The guild 
was organized on December 2, 1907, at the 
residence of Mrs. Fleetwood Gruver, with 16 
charter members. Meetings are held at the 
residence of the members, b_v invitation, on 
the first and third Monday of each month. 
There is at present a membership of thirty- 
five, including the three classes, active, 
associate and honorary. Beside the regular 
work of the organization in the care of the 
chapel, the guild is prominent in organiz- 
ing entertainments and social functions. 
Similar guilds are organized in connection 
with the Episcopal church in the Canal 
Zone in Culebra, Empire, and Cristobal. 

A costume dance was given b^- the Bache- 
lor Girls' Club of Culebra at the Commission 
clubhouse on Thursday evening, October 29. 
The hall was decorated in accordance with 
the custom on All Hallow-e'en, green and 
yellow being the colors, and "Jack o' Lan- 
terns" served as lights. Programs and fa- 
vors suitable to the occasion were distributed. 
Some of the costumes worn were: Indian 
Maid, Merry Widow, Dutch Peasant, French 
Maid, Spanish Dancer, Colonial Maid, Col- 
lege Girl, Martha Washington, Night, Dres- 
den Girl, Fluffy RufiBes, Sweet Lavender, 
Twenty Centnry Girl, Summer Girl, Flower 
Girls, and Dolly Varden. 

A feature of the evening was the electrical 
arrangement, introducing the "Moonlight 
Waltz," the idea being original with the 
Bachelor Girls. The lights were extin- 
guished with the exception of an electric 
motto draped in green, and a very tropical 
moon, which gave the desired effect. About 
80 couples participated. Five matrons acted 
as chaperons. "Visitors from other clubs 
were the guests of the evening. 

The Bachelor Girls' Club was organized 
September 22, 1908, with a membership of 
twenty. The following are the officers: 
President, Miss Katherine Pender; vice-presi- 
dent. Miss Eileen Reid.v; secretary, Miss 
W^ilda Wickham; treasurer, Miss Katherine 
Griley. The object of the organization is to 
bring the bachelor girls of the Isthmus to- 
gether in social functions. The club will 
give dances at holiday times. 

The Las Cascadas Woman's Club met at 
the residence of the president on Thursday 
afternoon, October 29. Mrs. Thomas E. 
Brown, of Cristobal, was the guest for the af- 
ternoon, and the program consisted of read- 
ing the report of the Boston biennial. The 
club hopes to hold its next meeting in the 
new club room. 

The date of the cake sale for St. Luke's 
Altar Guild, Ancon, has been put forward 
from November 14 to November 21. The 



sale %vill be held at the home of Archdeacon 
Bryan. It will begin at 4 o'clock in the 
afternoon and continue into the night, or 
until all the cakes are sold. 



PERSONAL. 



Mr. R. M. .\rango, formerly head of the 
Division of Meteorology and River Hydrau- 
lics under the Isthmian Canal Commission, 
who has been appointed by President Obal- 
dia Minister Plenipotentiary to the Court of 
St. James, sailed for England a few days ago. 

Mr. Frederick Palmer, who holds high 
rank among .\merican correspondents, and 
is also a successful writer of fiction, spent 
two days in the Canal Zone during the past 
week on his way from Central .America to 
the States. He was returning from an ex- 
tended trip through the Central American 
republics in search of information for a 
series of articles which he is about to write 
for the Chicago Tribune. 

Mr. Benj. L. Jacobson, claim officer, has 
been transferred from the office of the Chair- 
man at Culebra to the office of the Purchas- 
ing Officer at Washington. 

Rev. John W. Holland has been appointed 
a chaplain in the service of the Commission. 
He will be stationed at Culebra. 

Mr. R. M. Gamble, formerly acting quar- 
termaster at Bas Obispo, has returned from 
his leave of absence and will be appointed 
District Quartermaster at Corozal. 

Death of Dr. John H. PnrueH. 

Ancon, C. Z., October 27, 1908. 

The Chief Sanitary Officer announces with 
great regret, to the officials and employes 
of this Department, the death of Dr. John 
H. Purnell, Health Officer of Panama, Mon- 
day, October 26, 1908, while on vacation 
leave in the States. 

Dr. Purnell has for many years been en- 
gaged in yellow fever work in the southern 
part of the United States. His work in 
Tennessee, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas, 
in fighting this disease was notable. The 
experience and knowledge gained in that 
work made him a valuable assistant to the 
Chief Sanitary Officer. 

Dr. Purnell was appointed a physician in 
this Department on April 26, 1905, and on 
June 16 of the same year he was appointed 
Health Officer of Panama, which position he 
filled until his death. Under Dr. Purnell, 
Panama was made a healthy city, and it was 
largely due to his efforts that yellow fever 
was finally stamped out. The ability and 
tact with which Dr. Purnell handled the 
difficult situation, and the results accom- 
plished b}' him areworthj- of all commenda- 
tion. 

The Department extends its sympathy to 
the family of Dr. Purnell. 

W. C. G0RG.4.S, 
Chief Sanitary Officer. 

Missing: Men. 

The American Consul General at Panama 
has been asked for information as to the 
whereabouts of the following men and will 
be glad to hear from anyone who can sup- 
ply it: 

John or Julius Hauseman or Houseman. 

C. W. Fleck or Chester Wallace. 

Dan or Daniel Brewer. 

Edgar L. Rosselot. 

Otis Bberheardt, formerly of Jacksonville, 
Florida. 



76 



THE CANAL RECORD 



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o 
o 

o 

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WW 

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O Pi 
1— I 

P 
o 

pq 
to 

< 

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THE CANAL RECORD 



77 



HOSTLING. 

Caring for the Locomotives After Their 
Day's Work. 

At 5 o'clock in the afternoon the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission engineer takes 
his train to the nearest siding, uncouples 
his locomotive from the string of loaded 
or empty cars, and runs the engine to 
the hostling yard. His dinner over, he 
goes to his quarters, and the following 
morning at 6.30 o'clock he is in the cab 
again. From the time the engineer leaves 
his locomotive at night until he takes the 
throttle again in the morning, the engine 
also is resting and preparing for the next 
day's work. Its food is two or three tons 
of coal, several barrels of water, and a few- 
bushels of sand; and once in two weeks it is 
given a bath in the form of a "washout." 
The engineer calls his diuner and rest "rec- 
reation," and the recreation of his locomo- 
tive "hostling." Hosth.ig is as essential to 
the engine as recreation is to the engineer. 

Between fifty and sixty locomotives are 
hostled every night at Pedro Miguel. Dur- 
ing the day screws have begun to show 
wear, a- drawhead has weakened, a grate 
given out, lubricators and injectors, rod 
brasses, air brake equipment or trucks need 
repairing, the guides on the piston cross- 
head must be closed, or some other little 
weaknesses have developed in several of the 
engines; and those so affected are run into 
the shed, over the repair pit if necessary, 
and the machinist begins the repairs at once. 
The other engines are turned over to the six 
"gold" men known as "hostlers." These 
men have served as engineers and are now 
hostling, waiting a chance to take a regular 
run. 

Each hostler takes four locomotives in one 
train and runs them to the coal chute, then 
to the sand chute, and then to the water 
pipe. This order may be changed as con- 
venience dictates, but the process remains 
the same, and when the hostler leaves the 
engines they have a full store of coal, a 
tank full of w-ater, and sand enough in the 
sand box to meet the next daj-'s demands. 
Firemen then separate the cinders from the 
coal, dump them, and bank the fire. The 
oil cups are filled, the light repairs finished, 
and the locomotives cleaned, usually by 
midnight. After that the hostler's work is 
merely to visit each engine two or three 
times until 5 o'clock, and see that all is go- 
ing well. Between 5 and 6 o'clock the fires 
are raked again, and when the engineer 
takes his locomotive at 6.30 o'clock the fire 
is bright, and the gauge registers from 120 
to 150 pounds of steam. 

Four engines are ''washed out" every 
night, and an order is preserved so that 
each has a thorough cleaning once in fifteen 
days. Like the locomotives that need repair- 
ing, those to be washed out are separated 
from the rest early in the evening and hos- 
tled at once. Thej* are then run over the 
cinder pit where the fires are dumped, and 
taken into the house where the steam and 
water are allowed to escape, while cold 
water is forced into the boilers and running 
out carries with it the loose matter that has 
collected during two weeks. All this takes 
from 5.30 o'clock in the evening until 2 
o'clock the next morning, when the fires 
are started again, and at 6.30 the engines 
are ready for their work. 

To one not accustomed to such work the 



hostlers and their helpers moving in and out 
among the great engines, with the shadows 
deepened by an occasional headlight, the 
gleam from the cinder pit, or rays from the 
workmen's lanterns, make an eerie sight. 
Fifty locomotives maneuver in files of four on 
only six tracks, and so close to one another 
that the trainsalmost touch, while half a 
hundred men hurry about among them. 
It looks like a mix-up and sounds like dis- 
cord; but the engines start only on double 
signals, there are no collisions, accidents 
are few, the work moves swiftly. 

At daybreak the result of it all is seen in 
the locomotives standing read)-, like horses 
at the barrier. On the morning of October 
29, at 6.30 o'clock 52 locomotives left the 
j-ard in nine minutes, and often the clearance 
is made in seven minutes. Between 6.30 
and 6.41 o'clock two locomotives had left 
the yard, coupled to a train of sixteen 20-yard 
cars which had been left on the siding the 
night before, had stretched the unloader 
cable, and started to the La Boca dumps. 

Manj' railroad men on the Isthmus are of 
the opinion that this dail}- performance at 
Pedro Miguel is quite unique in railroading. 
It is unique on the Canal work, however, 
only because it is the one place where so 
many locomotives are stationed over night. 
At Las Cascadas 35 engines are handled in 
the same way and at Empire, Gorgona, and 
otiier points like work is done with the 
smaller number of locomotives hostled at 
those places. All the hostling for the Cen- 
tral Division is done by the Mechanical Di- 
vision, and a statement of the work in Sep- 
tember is as follows, the material charged to 
this account being for coal, oil, sand and 
waste: 

COST OF OPERATING COAL CHUTES DURING THE 
MONTH OF SEPTEMBER. 190S. 



I,OCATION. 



Las Cascadas On bin.. . 
Delivered 



Tons 
handled 



Cost of 
operating 



Total . 



Pedro Miguel On bin... 
LJelivtred 



Grand total. 



2,769 
2,769 



Cost of 
opera tin 
per ton 
of coal 
handled. 



5,538 $138.69 



3.273 
3.275 



12.C 



S-'70.88 



$409.57 



.0339 



Las Cascadas — 214 tons coal unloaded by hand 
account not received in hopper-bottom cars, 
additional expense incurred $10.00 

Pedro -Miffiiel — S7 tons coal unloaded by hand 
account not received in honper-bottom cars, 
additional expense incurred 4.00 

STATEMENT SHOWING COST OF HOSTLING FOR THE 
MONTH OF SEPTEMBER. 1903. 



LOCATION. 



Goriirona 

Santa Cmz 

San Pal)lo 

Tabernilla 

Empire 

Bas Obispo. . . . 

La Boca ....... 

1..1S Cascadas. 
re tro Miguel. 
Kio Grande. . . 



Total. 



Number 
hostled. 



235 
735 
4.'0 
638 
130 
147 
1,043 
1.574 
216 



Cost of 
hostling. 



SS03.53 
333.38 
874.63 
371.17 

1,376.45 
412.90 
344.63 

1,946.09 

3,169 IS 
237.72 



Average 
cost per 
engine. 



1.16S 
1.419 
1.190 
.884 
2.157 
3.176 
2.344 
1.866 
2.013 
1.101 



5,826 I $9,869.68 



1.694 



The average number of men employed in 
hostling for the Central Division in Sep- 
tember was — Gorgona, 16; Tabernilla, 6; 
Santa Cruz, 5; San Pablo, 15; Las Cascadas, 
29; Empire, 16; Rio Grande, 9; Bas Obispo, 
5; Pedro Miguel, 47; La Boca, 4. 

At Pedro Miguel the facilities for hostling 
are good, although not faultless. The track 
lay-out is well adapted to sending the loco- 
motives out in a short time, but not to han- 



dling them so easily on their return from 
work. Four tracks run through the engine 
house, which can accommodate twenty en- 
gines, and outside the house are one track 
and two leads to the yard. The cinder 
pit extends under tw-o tracks between which 
is a depressed track on which the cin- 
ders are hauled out. Double tracks lead 
to the coal chute and one track runs up 
the incline. In the chute an engine run by 
compressed air furnishes the power for haul- 
ing cars up the incline by cable. There are 
24 pockets and the capacity is 120 tons. In 
the coal chute is a sand plant in which sea 
sand is dried, sifted, and lifted l)y air to the 
storage bin. An oil house is nearby. 

The machine shop at Pedro Miguel is 
equipped to do any light repairing. The 
machinery consists of: One French black- 
smith's fan, 20 inches in diameter; one 15- 
inch emery wheel— double; one40-inch grind 
stone; one 48-inch grind stone; one com- 
bined w-et and dry grinder, 12-inch table; 
one drill press, 15-inch table; one drill press 
31-inch table; one old French drill press; 
one engine lathe, 18 by 60-inch; one La 
Blond lathe, 24 by 10-inch; one French 
shaper, 18-inch stroke ; one American 
shaper, 24-inch stroke; one 2-horsepower 
air motor; one old French engine, cylinders 
8 by 12-inch, used for power at shop; one 
old French pump 314 by 4-inch, one pipe 
bending machine, bends pipe from V4-inch 
by 2-inch diameter; one pipe cutting and 
threading michine, (will handle pipe from 
1 to 5-inches diameter); one pipe cutting and 
threading machine, (will handle pipe from 
2V2 to 12-inches diameter); onepow-er hack 
saw, 5V4-inch stroke; one old French punch 
and shear, 14-inch throat; one double head 
bolt cutter, Vi-inch to 2 inch; one portable 
air-brake testing machine; one forcing press, 
30 by 35-inch, capacity- 30 tons; one vertical 
wood boring mill, Vo-inch to 2-inch; one rip 
saw, table 3 feet 3 inches by 5 feet; one 
2-cylinder air driven engine for coal hoist. 

Las Cascadas yard is shorter than that at 
Pedro Miguel, and the double cinder pit is 
afeone side the yard and nearer the engine 
house. There are five tracks through the 
house and one on each side. The capacity of 
the house is 30 engines. The coal and sand 
chutes are of the same type as at Pedro Mi- 
guel. The machine equipment is as follows: 
One 44-inch blacksmith's fan; one emery 
wheel and stand, 15-inch; one 48-inch grind 
stone; one French drill press. No. 9, 15-inch 
sw-ing; one American upright drill press, 16- 
inch table; one American drill press, 18-inch 
table; one 16-inch Pratt & Whitney lathe; 
one IS-inch LaBlond engine lathe; one 
French shaper, 18-inch stroke; one French 
2-cvlinder vertical engine, used for power 
for shop; one 2-cylinder horizontal air en- 
gine, used for operating hoisting device at 
coal chute; one 2-cylinder air engine, to op- 
erate sand shaker; one Dean duplex pump, 
10 by 5 by 12; one forcing press 30 by 36- 
inch, with a capacity of 30 tons. 

Since October 1, no engines have been 
hostled at Rio Grande. At the smaller host- 
ling stations the machinery equipment is 
small. Hea.-y repairs to locomotives are 
made at Gorgona. 

The engines of the Pacific Division are 
hostled in the field at the Miraflores lock 
site, and those of the Atlantic Division are 
cared for at Gatun. In all there were 298 
locomotives in the service of the Commis- 
sion in September. 



78 



THE CANAL RECORD 



ANGLICAN CHURCH ON ISTHMUS. 

Established Here In 1883 for Benefit of 
Negroes. 

Twenly-five\ears ago the Church of Eng- 
land was established on the Isthmus of Pana- 
ma. The quarter centennial will be observed 
at Colon, Panama, and Gorpona in the week 
beginning November 22. On that day, at 3 
p. m.. in Christ Church. Colon, Rev. S. 
Purccll Hendrick, of Jamaica, for sixteen 
years pastor of the church, will preach the 
anniversary sermon. On November 24 he 
will preach at St. .Andrew's Church, in Gor- 
gona, and at 3 p. tn. on October 29, in St. 
Paul's Church, Panama. A picnic for church 
members will be held at Gorgona on Novem- 
ber 26, when the morning will be given over 
to entertainment of all kin<ls, and the after- 
noon to addresses and other formal exer- 
cises. 

The distinction made between the Angli- 
can Church (Engli.sh) and the Protestant 
Episcopal Church (.American) must be kept 
in mind in any clear conception of the an- 
niversary about to be celebrated. The An- 
glican Church was a factor in canal work 
from 1SS3 until 1907, while the Protestant 
Episcopal Church began its work on the 
Isthmus in 1865, and resumed it in 1907. 
Christ Church in Colon was consecrated in 
1855, with the idea that it would be the cen- 
ter of the religious life of the little colony 
of Americans collected there by the Panama 
Railroad Company. It is a handsome struc- 
ture, built of stone, and cost S75,O0O. Po- 
litical reasons caused its practical abandon- 
ment after a few years, and it served 
variously as a barracks, a magazine and 
arsenal, and a storehouse, during the rev- 
olutions that vexed Colombia in the sev- 
enties. From 1865 until 1SS3 it was under 
the jurisdiction of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church. 

When the French began their work on the 
Canal there was a large immigration of West 
Indians to the Isthmus. .As most of the im- 
migrants caine from Jamaica and other Brit- 
ish West Indian islands, there were m;my 
members of the Anglican Church among 
them. Not with any idea of proselyting, but 
to minister strictly to members of that 
church, the Anglican missions vvere estab- 
lished on the Isthmus. Speaking of tlie open- 
ing of the work, Rev. Mr. Hendrick .says: 

"We were warmly welcomed by both the 
French Canal Company and the Panama 
Railroad Company. The former provided 
us with camps at different centers of work 
along the route of the canal, and in one or 
two instances built churches for -our use; 
and also contributed monthly a sum toward 
the maintenance of the work. The privi- 
lege to continue our work in these buildings 
at these places was conceded to us by the 
new Panama Canal Company, who were 
willing to recognize the necessity of the con- 
tinuation of our work, but who did not find 
it possible to make any contribution toward 
its maintenance. The Panama Railroad Com- 
pany ver\- gracioush- allowed us the free and 
exclusive use of Christ Church, Colon, and 
supplied a furni.shed residence for the clergy- 
man ministering therein. He was treated 
as a chaplain of the company in his official 
capacity-, and was granted a monthly sum 
toward his stipend. He was also permitted, 
as well as others associated with him in the 
work, to travel on the road free of charge. 



We were able in the course of years to es- 
tablish missions at Mount Hope (t'len 
Monkey Hill), San Pablo. Gorgona. Bas 
Obispo. Las Cascadas, Culebra, and Paraiso, 
also opening a mission in the citj- of Pan- 
ama. At these places day-schools for the 
education of the children of the laboring 
class were established, and were conducted 
by men trained for such work under govern- 
ment supervision in the Lsland of Jamaica, 
who also performed the duties of catechists 
or lay-readers at the said stations. These 
places are maintained partly by the volun- 
tary contributions of people residing therein, 
and parth- by a vote of money from our mis- 
sionary society in England." 

On account of the change of sovereignty 
in the Canal territory the Anglican Church 
turned its work over to the Protestant Epis- 
copal Church, November 1, 1907. The pri- 
mary reason for establishing the Church here 
in 1883 was to work among the West Indian 
laborers. No distinction between white and 
negro members was made, and the great 
majority of those who now attend the Epis- 
copal Churches on the Isthmus are negro 
employes of the Commission. It is the be- 
lief of Archdeacon Henry B. Brj-an that a 
majorit}- of the 34,000 negroes in the Canal 
Zone were brought up under the influence 
of the Anglican Church, and therefore are 
nominally Episcopalians. The number of 
communicants is about one thousand. The 
•schools for lay instruction were abandoned 
as soon as the Canal Zone public schools 
were opened, except the schools in Panama, 
Colon, Las Cascadas and Mount Hope, in 
which 260 pupils are enrolled. 

There are now thirteen congregations of 
West Indians on the Isthmus: St. Paul's, 
Panama; St. Augustine's, Paraiso; St. Mark's, 
Culebra; St. Matthew's, Empire; St. Phil- 
lip's, Las Cascadas; Ascension, Bas Obispo; 
St. Andrew's, Gorgona; St. Peter's, San 
Paljlo; St. John's, Mount Hope; Christ, Co- 
lon, and missions at Guachapali, Pleya de 
Flor and La Boca. 

Since the coming of Americans the work 
of the Church has been less closely confined 
to negroes. Five congregations for white 
people have been organized : Ancon, Cu- 
lebra, Empire. Gorgona, and Cristobal. 

It will be understood, of course, that re- 
ligious work in the Canal Zone is not con- 
fined to any one sect. The Roman Catholics, 
Wesle\-ans, and Baptists have churches at 
various points in the Zone; and indepen- 
dent services are held in several of the 
Canal villages. There is no village along 
the line of the Canal where there is not at 
least one church, and in several of them 
there are two or three congregations. 



Rifle Range in Old French Spillway, 

A rifle range for the use of the detach- 
ment of the United States Marine Corps sta- 
tioned at Camp Elliott, has been laid oflf in 
the spillway dug by the French as part of 
their scheme for controlling the Chagres 
River by a dam at Gamboa. As laid off the 
range is only six hundred yards, but there is 
room for a longer one if it is desired. The 
old spillway channel is complete!}' excavated 
so that there is a level stretch of land about 
120 feet wide at bottom, a thousand yards 
long, and almost completely surrounded by 
hills. The location is northeast of Santa 
Cruz and easily accessible by a newly cut 
trail. The butts are being built in the side 



of a hill 190 feet high and 70 feet above the 
bottom of the old spillway. Back of this hill 
the railroad track runs to the new storage 
magazine at Gamboa, but as the subgrade 
of the track is at SO feet, and the whole hill 
is thus between the butts and the railroad, 
the proximity of the railroad was not con- 
sidered of any moment in establishing the 
range. 

Women's Waiting Room, Cristobal. 

A waiting room for women has been built 
at Cristobal, across the track, opposite the 
north end of the station platform. The 
building is one story high, 30 feet square, 
with a screened veranda, eight feet wide, 
entirely around it. The waiting room is 14 
feet by 20 feet, with a toilet room attached. 



Card of Thanks. 

Mrs. Ruth E. Averill together with her 
children, Glenn and Clara, and her brothers, 
Willis and Lewis Webster, wish to thank 
the Knights of Pythias, Odd Fellows, Ma- 
sons, Association of Steam Shovel Men and 
their other friends for the many kindnesses 
shown them in their recent bereavement. 



Attention, Kangaroos. 

All members of the Independent Order of 
Panamanian Kangaroos that are to compose 
the Ancon Court, No. 7, are earnesth' re- 
quested to meet in the hall over the District 
Quartermaster's office in Ancon, near Hotel 
Tivoli, on Friday, November 6, at 7 p. m., 
sharp. This is a very important meeting, 
and all are urged to be present. Bj- order of 
Sam B. Dennis. 

Notice to Shovel Men. 

All members of the I. B. of S. S. and D. 
M. are requested to attend a meeting in the I. 
C. C. hall. Empire, Sunday, November 8, at 
2.30 p. m. S. I. Lyons. 

Concerts by the I. C. C. Band. 

BAS OBISPO, C. Z., 
Sunday, November 8, 1908, at 2.30 p. m.: 

PROGRAM. 

1 March — Santiago Fh'nn Morse 

2 Selection— //;Vi of the Day Remick 

i Vi'anz—Moonlishi on the Hudson Tobani 

f a Intermezzo — Ivanhoe Van Alstyne 

^\b Schottische — Let Me Be Your Lemon 
' Coon Allen 

5 .Selection — The Son/ A'iss Levi 

6 Idyl— The C/osc IFoi-m Lincke 

7 Popular March— /^isian Lamb Ras Wenrich 

5 Overture — Lnstspiel .Suppe 

9 Patrol — American Meacham 

in Galop — Telemackns Bennett 

CRISTOBAl,, C. Z., 
On band stand near Clubhouse. Wednesday, Novem- 
ber 11. 190S. at 8. IS p. m.: 

PROGR.\M. 

1 March — U'aJdmeie Losey 

2 Selection — MilVs Mert-y Melodies Mills 

3 Waltz — Thonsand and One Niskts Strauss 

C a Intermezzo — Nafianee Williams 

4 \ b Schottische— (f'A^n a Boy Says " Will 

( Von.f" Allen 

.S Potpourri — T/ie Snnny Sonth (by request) .Lampe 

6 Intermezzo — A/tei Sunset Pryor 

7 Humoresqueon TheAfe/-fyIt^ido7L'ira/tz.liQUstedt 
Introducing this popular melody from the opera 

"' The Merry Widow." burlesqued in the fullnwnng 
manner: 1. .\ little German band: 2. A flute solo 
with organ effect: 3. An amateur trombonist, who is 
willing to show what he can do if only requested 
to: 4, A street piano: 5. A la ragtime as played on a 
banjo: and finally — the result, the popularity of 
this melody has produced — a brainstorm. 

5 Overture — Four Ages of Man I^chner 

9 Patrol — American , Meacham 

10 March— 0/rf Salt Hildreth 

Chas. E. Jennings, Musical Director. 
A concert will be giveu at Gorgona, C. Z., Sun- 
day. November 15. 



THE CANAL RECORD- 



79 



COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT. 

TURKEYS, CRANBERRIES. OYSTERS, 

The Subsistence Department has placed 
orders in the States for a supply of turke\'S, 
cranberries and oysters to be delivered on 
the Isthmus before Thanksgiving Day, A 
large enough quantity of each has been or- 
dered to supply all the Commission hotels, 
as well as families. 

Within a few days cold storage supplies 
for Gatun, Gorgona, Empire, Culebra, 
Pedro Miguel, Ancon, and La Boca will be 
shipped from Cristobal on the freight train 
leaving at midnight instead of on the sup- 
ply train leavingat 4.30 a. m. This arrange- 
ment will reduce the length of the supply 
train and will enable the department to de- 
liver cold storage articles earlier in the 
morning on the Pacific side of the Isthmus. 

COMMISSARY PRICES 

For week begiuuing November 3: 

FRESH MEATS. 

Price. 

Mutton— Stewiug per lb 6 

Shoulder and neck (not under 

6 pounds) per lb 7 

Entire forequarter (not under 

10 pounds) per lb 8 

Leg (S to 10 pounds) per lb 16 

Short-cut chops per lb 22 

Lamb — Stewing per lb 6 

Entire forequarter per lb 8 

Leg (6 to S pounds) - per lb 27 

Veal— Stewing ■•■ per lb 10 

Entire forequarter CIS to 20 lbs). ...per lb 11 

Loin for roasting per lb 21 

Chops per lb 22 

Beef— Suet per lb 4 

Soup per lb S 

Stew per lb 12 

Corned per lb.. 12. 14. 16 

Pot roast (.from sirloin butt) per lb 17 

Rib-roast, second cut (not under 3 

pounds) per lb 19 

Rib-roast, short cut (not under 3'/^ 

pounds I per lb 23 

Sirloin roast per lb 29 

Rump roast per lb 29 

Porterhouse roast per lb 29 

Steak, round per lb 23 

Rib per lb 2+ 

Sirloin per lb 29 

Porterhouse per lb 29 

Rump per lb 29 

Tenderloin per lb 30 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Livers— Calf each 65 

Sausage — Pork per lb 19 

Leberwurst per lb 17 

Sweet bread — Veal each 1.20 

Ox tongues each 90 

Pigs' tongues, pickled per lb IS 

Eggs, fresh dozen 34 

POULTRY AND GAME. 

Chickens— Capons each 2.40 

Broilers each 60 

Fowls, medium and large each. 80c. and 1.00 

Turkeys per lb 30 

Squabs each 45 

Suckling pigs (whole! each 3.50 

Suckling pigs (one-half) each 1.75 

CURED AND PICKLED MEATS. 

Bacon— Strips per lb 23 

English, breakfast sliced per lb §26 

Ham — Sugar-cured, sliced per lb §25 

Ofte-half. for boiling per lb §21 

Ferris per lb 20 

Beef, salt, family per lb 16 

Salt pork per lb 13 

DAIRY PRODUCTS. 

Cheese — Neufchatel each 6 

Young America per lb 22 

Swiss per lb 31 

Edam each 1.05 

McLaren's jar 15 

Pinxters tin 22 

Freuch cheese in tins — Camembert. Roque- 
fort, Brie. Neufchatel tin 20 



VEGETABLES AND FRUITS. 

Tomatoes (local only) oer lb 8 

White potatoes per lb hV^ 

Sweet pot;itoes per lb 2'/i 

Cabbage per lb 4 

Onions per lb 3Vs 

Cucumbers per lb 25 

Beets per lb 5 

Carrots per lb 5 

Turnips per lb 3 

Lemons dozen 24 

Oranges dozen 18 

Grapefruit each 3 

Alligator pears each 5 

§ Sold only from cold-storage and not from Coia- 
missaries. 

NEW ARTICLES. 

Price. 

Cigarette paper, "La Croix" book 2J-< 

Viscol shoe dressing. J<-pint. tin 25 

Sticks, shaving. Pear's each 25 

Pans, sauce. Berlin, No. 012 each 80 



Stages of the Chagres. 

Maximum height of Chagres above low 
water for the week ending midnight, Oc- 
tober 31, 1908: 





Stations. 






i 


,; 




pi=' 


^ 


















•5 




^ 


d 


= s; 


c =■ 




,§ 




s 


i^a 


■du 


















> 


< 




c 


o 


t> 


Height of low water 














above meau sea 














level, feet 


129 


92 


46 











Maximum height ab. 














low water, feet: 














Sunday. Oct. 25. ... 


4.9 


4..5 


7.,'i 


S.9 


3.4 


4.6 


Monday. Oct. 26 


9.2 


7.2 


10.4 


11.7 


4.9 


6.5 


Tuesday, Oct. 27. ... 


9.3 


7.3 


s.n 


14.2 


5.3 


7.6 


Wedn'sday, Oct. 23 


S.4 


7.3 


10,5 


14.3 


6.5 


8.6 


Thursday. Oct. 29.. 


4.6 


4.2 


9.2 


14.9 


■S.S 


7.9 


Friday, Oct. 30 


7.6 


6.2 


10.1 


15.2 


7.1 


9.4 


Saturday. Oct. 31 ... 


4.0 


4.6 


10.0 


16.0 


7.7 


10.0 


Maximum for week.. 


9.3 


7.3 


10.5 


16.0 


7.7 


10.0 



UNCLAIMED PACKAGES. 

The following is a list of packages that 
have been forwarded from New York to 
Isthmian Canal Commission and Panama 
railroad emploj-es, and that are waiting to 
be claimed at the freight house at Colon. 
The owners of these packages will have to 
make application for free customs entry in 
connection ivith Circular No. 85, or in the 
alternative, pay duty to the Panama Gov- 
ernment customs on the value of the con- 
tents of the packages, before delivery can 
be effected: 

W. S. Clemeuts. Colon, 1 box. Advance; July 6. 190S. 

J. F. Montero, Panama, 2 cases instrument boxes. 
Allianca: July 15. 190S. 

J. K. Derapsey, Colon. 1 box cloth, Allianca: July 
15, 1908. 

S. Chenalloy. Colon. 1 parcel (No. 7656). Advance: 
July 10, 1908. 

C.Thomas. Cristobal, 1 parcel (No. ms), Espei-- 
anza: Au.crust IS, 1908. 

A. Y. Ingram. Colon. 1 bundle wall paper. Finance: 
September S, 1908. 

J. O. Gonzalez. Colon. 1 case hardware. Colon: Sep- 
tember 18. 1903. 

G. H. Jack. Matachin. 1 case plaster paiis. Alli- 
anca: September 21. 190S. 

Hugh Crabtree. l^as Cascades,! parcel (No. 7S4S) . 
Allianca: September 21. 1908. 

Alex Sancloss. Ancon, 1 box E. ware. Finance: Sep- 
tember 26. I90S. 

J. W. Hughes, Cristobal, 5 barrels household goods. 
1 crate sewing machine. Finance: September 26, 1908. 

C. J. Geddes. Gatun. 1 parcel (No. 7862). Finance: 
September 26. 1908. 

Haynes Clark. Empire. 1 box. Advance: October 
8. 1908. 

Mrs. Sam Chas. Lewis, Corozal, 1 box. Advance: 
October S, 1908. 

Isthmian Locomotive Engineers. Las Cascadas, 1 
box photographs. Advance: October 8, 1908. 

Mrs. J, K. Baxter, Culebra, 1 parcel (No. 7877) . Ad- 
vance: October 8, li.OS. 



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS. 

Leaves of Absence, 

[ Thefoliowins circular supersedes tlie circular with 
the same title, piihlislted on page 71 of the issue of 
The Canal Record/o/- October 28, 1908.'\ 

CcLEERA. C. Z.. October 20. 19u8. 
CiRCVLAR No. 218. 

This office has been requested, in iiuinerons recent 
instances, to waive the rules govemiuK leaves of ab- 
sence, in favor of employes who have been misled by 
erroneous information given them by timekeepers, 
or subordinate officials, and have thus allowed their 
leave to become forfeited. 

To prevent the recurrence of similar misunder- 
standings, timekeepers and subordinate officials 
should be instructed to give no information to em- 
ployes relative to their leave, and to take no action 
on applications for leave, but to forward all intiuiries 
and api>lications to the administrative office of the 
department or division \Wth such comment or recom- 
mendation as may be required. 

Any case to which the application of the rules gov- 
erning leaves of absence may not be perfectly clear, 
should be referred to this office for decision. 

So far as may be practicable, the heads of depart- 
ments and divisions will see that employes apply for 
their leave before it is forfeited. In future, no plea 
of ignorance of the published rules, or of misvnider- 
sUmdingdue to erroneous information, will be con- 
sidered. 

This circular should be posted on all official bul- 
letin boards and given the widest possible publicity. 
H. F. Hodges. 
Acting Chairman. 

Pay for November 3. 

Culebra. C. Z.. October 26. 190S. 
To All Concerned: 

November 3. which is to be obser\-ed as a holiday 
in the Canal Zone, is not one of the holidays for 
which gratuity time is allowed under Circular No. 
133. and time for tliat day will be allowed on the 
sume basis as time for Sundays. 

H. F. Hodges, 
Acting Chainnun and Chief Engineer. 

LEGAL NOTICE. 

Empire. C. Z.. October 22. 190S. 
To any and all persons who may have any claim 
or claims against the estate of Philip F. Kramer, de- 
ceised, who met his deatli at the town of Paraiso, 
Canal Zone, on December 17. 1907 : You will present 
the same on or before the 1st day of December. 190S. 
to Theodore C. Hinckley, administrator of the estate 
of P. F. Kramer. Panama. Panamn. or E. M. Goolsby, 
Clerk of the Circuit Court. Empire. Canal Zone, 
properly verified, or the same will be forever barred 
according to law. 

Theo. C. Hinckley. 
Adm in istrator. 

Misdirected Letters. 

DiWsion of Posts. Customs and Revenues. 
Ancon. C. Z.. October 31. 190S. 
The following insufficiently addressed letters, origi- 
nating in the United States and its possessions, have 
been received in the office of the Director of Posts, 
and may be obtained ou regnestof addressee: 
Atkins. John Meyers. Arthur 

Barnes. M ad C Moore. Wade H. 

Barrett. Fred McCauU. Dan 

Barton. Edward McKaig, Mis. M. E- 

Blodgett. Glenn McKay. Hugh 

Coe. Capt. F. W. Norman. Thos. 

Davis. Mrs. D. R. Pabst. Chas. 

Deikman. O. H. Page. C. 

Drummond. J. H. Patterson. I,ouis 

Duncan. Geo. I,. Peck. W. D. 

Elemgren. G. Phillips, Frank 

Emerck. Frank Rath, Thomas J. 

Emlaw. Florence Rodgers. Viola 

Forsyth. I,. M. Ryberg, Oscar 

Galiger. Walter Sullivan. W, F. 

Gayer. Carl Thomas, Gus 

Gibson, \V. C. Tliull. Peter 

Gilman, Wm. F. Torosian. David 

Grauberg. Arthur Varencamp. Fred 

Hall. J. A. Walker. Hector 

HalUigan. Thomas Walsh. Stephen 

Hnrper. Archie Wals.ou, W. H. 

Kliuger. G. R. Ward. R. G. 

Laharty. Joe Wilbut Ruth 

l.ove. Chas. M. Whittaker. W. R. 

Lybiook. W. A. Vount, Mrs. J. L. 

The steamship JS'ordstjerniti sailed from Baltimore. 
Md., on October 25, nnth a cargo of 23. 7S4 feet B. M. 
lumber, 3.500 feet of culvert pipe, and tvn 40-ton 
locomotives for the Isthmian Canal Commission. 



The following steamers have recently arrived at I^ 
Boca: October 23. Z^ii, from Valparaiso; October 24. 
Ci(y of Para, from San Francisco. Departures wtre: 
October 2S. Peru, for Valparaiso: October 50, Quito, 
for Bueuaveuture. 



so 



THE CANAL RECORD 



CANAL DIRECTORY. 

ISTHMIAN CANAL COMMISSION. 

Lieut. -Col. Geo. W. Goetbals, U. S. A., 

Culebra. 
Lieut.-Col. H. F. Hodges, U. S. A.. Cule- 
bra. 
Maj. D. D. Gaillard, U. S. A., Empire. 
Maj. Wm. L. Sibert, U. S. A-., Gatun. 
Civil Engineer H. H. Rousseau, U. S. N., 

Culebra. 
Mr. Jo C. S. Blackburn, .\ncoii. 
Col. W. C. Gorgas, U. S. A., Ancon. 
Mr. Joseph Bucklin Bishop, 

Secretary, Aucon. 



DEPARTMENTS. 

Construction and Engineering. 

Headquarters. Culebra. 
Lieut. -Col. Geo. W. Goetbals, Chairman 
and Chief Engineer. 
M. B. DePutrou. Assistant to the Chairman. 
W. H. Mav, Secretary to the Chairni.in. 
C. A. Mclivaine. Chief Clerk. 
Caleb M. Saville. .Assistant Engineer. 

Lieut.-Col. H. F. Hodges, .Assistant Chief 
Engineer. 

C. O. Carlson. Secretar.v. 
Edward Schildhauer. Electrical and Mechanical 

Engineer. 
Henry Goldmark. I,. D. Coniish. H. F. Tucker 
and T. B. Monniche Designing Engineers. 

Civil Engineer H. H. Rousseau, Assistant 
to the Chief Engineer. 

J. C. Parsons, Secretary. 
A. B. Nichols. Office Engineer. 
P. O. Wright. Jr.. .\rchitect. 



Central Division. 

Headquarters. Empire. 
Maj. D. D. Gaillard, Division Engineer. 
A. E. Bronk. Chief Clerk. 
IvOuis K- Rourke. .\ssistant DivisioTi Engineer. 
A. .S. Zinn. Resident E'ngineer. 
M.ark W- Tenny. Assistant Engineer. 
R. W. Hebard. Assistant F.ngineer. 
W. h- Thompson. Assistant Engineer 
Geo. H. Ruggles. Assistant Engineer. 

Atlantic Division. 

Headquarters, Gatun. 
Maj. Wm. L. Sibert, Division Engineer. 

R. M. .Sands. Chief Clerk. 

Maj. Chester Harding, U. S. A., Assistant Divi- 
sion Engineer. 

Maj. Edgar Jad win. L^. S. A,. Resident Engineer. 

Maj. J. P. .len'ey. V, S. A.. Resident Engineer. 

Capt. G. M. Hofifnian, U. S. A.. .Assistant En- 
gineer. 

Capt. Norton \V. .Stickle. U. S. A.. Assistant En- 
gineer. 

I.,. G. Thonl. .\ssistant Engineer. 

F. C. Stanton, .^ssistaiit Engineer. 

R. B. Smith, Superintendent of Dredging. 

Pacific Division. 

Headquarters, Corozal. 
S. B. Williamson, Division Engineer. 

E. A. I.eJIay. Chief Clerk. 

W. G. Comber. Resilient Engineer. 

G. n. .Strickler. Resident Engineer. 
Win. F. ?I. Acheson. .\ssistant Engineer. 
James Macl-arlaue. Superiuteudent of Dredg- 
ing. 

Mechanical Division. 

Headquarters. Culebra. 
Geo. D. Brooke. Superintendent of Motive 
Power and Machinerv. 

F. W. Doty, Chief Clerk. 
EarleJ. Banta. Mechanical Er.gineer. 
A. J^. Robinson. Flf^clrical l-ngineer. 



Quartermaster's. 

Hendqn.arters, Culebra. 

Maj. C. A. Devol. U. S. A., Chief Quarter- 
master. 

C. H. Mnnn, Chief Clerk. 
I.ieut. K. K. Wood, U.S.A., A.ssi.sbmt CJnVf 
Oil:irtf*rnin';tt»r- 

Cnnt. Covirtland Nixnn. U. S. A.. Depot Quar- 
termaster, Mount Hope. 
C. L. Parker, C. C. McColley. Inspectors. 
H. S. Parish. Actine Survey Officer. 

District Quartermasters. 

Ira A. Giles. Cristobal. 

R, R. Waisoii (actinjr). Gatuu. 

J, INI, Kinu'. Tabeniilln. 

J. H. Humphreys, San Fablo. 



R. C. Shady. Gorgonn. 

M. R. Currie. Bas Obispo. 

D. T. .Shannon. Lns Cascadas. 

J. B. Jeffries. Culebra. 

C. P. Allen. Emoire. 

Harry Dniidas (actlnz). Paraiso. 

Otlo Maistrand, Pedro Miguel. 

R. M. Gamble, lading). Corozal. 

B. C. Poole, Ancon. 
W. H. South. La Bocn. 

C. E. Heisey, Porto P.ello. 

Subsistence. 

Headquarters, Cristobal. 
Maj. KugeneT. Wilson. U. S. A., Subsistence 
Officer. 

W. F. Shipley. Chief Clerk. 
Lieut. Frank O. Whitlock, U. S, A., Assistant 
Subsistence Officer. 



Civil Administration. 

Headquarters. Ancon. 
Jo C. S. Blackburn, Head of the Department. 
H. D. Reed, F.xecutive Secretary. 

G. A. Ninas, Chief Clerk. 
Tom M. Cooke. Chief. Di\ision of Posts. Cus- 
toms and Revenues, Ancon. 
Herman A. Gndger. Deputy Collector. Ancon. 
E. I.ewls Baker. Deputy Collector, Cristobal. 
George M. Shontz, Prosecuting Attorney, Ancon. 
George R. Shantou, Chief of Police. Ancon. 

D. E. McDonald. Chief Clerk. 
C. P-. Weidjnan, Chief. Fire Department. Cris- 
tobal. 
Geo. L- Campeii. Supt of Public Works, Aucon. 

C. R. Sargent. Chief Clerk. 
J. J. Reidy. Asst. Supt. Public Works. Cristobal. 
H. L. Smith. Superintendent of Schools, Ancon 
H. A. A. Smith. Treasurer of Canal Zone. Em- 
pire. 

Canal Zone Judiciary. 

Headquarters. Ancon. 
Supreme Court— Dr. F. Mutis Durdn, Chief 
Justice. 

Walter Emery. Clerk. Ancon. 
H. A. Gudger, Associate Justice. Empire. 
Lorin C. Collins. Associate Justice. Cristobal. 
Circuit Court. First Circuit— Dr. F. Mutis 
Duran. Judge. Ancon. 
Walter Emery. Clerk. 
Circuit Court, Second Circuit— H. A. Gudger. 
Judq"e. Empire. 
Elbert ^L Goolsby, Clerk. 
Circuit Court. Third Circuit— Lorin C. Collins. 
Judge, Cristobal. 

Nelson R. Johnson, Clerk. 
M. C. Rerdell. Senior District Judge, Cristobal. 
S. E^ Blackburn. District Judge, Ancon. 
Edgar S. Garrison. District Judge. Empire. 
J. B. March. District Judge. Gorgona. 
Thomas E- Brown. Jr.. District Judge. Cristo- 
bal. 

Headquarters, Washington. D. C. 
Richard Reid Rog-ers, General Counsel, 
Washington, D. C. 

George M. Shontz. Attorney for Isthmian Canal 
Commission and Panama Railroad Company, 
Ancon. 

George H. Bartholomew, .Assistant Attorney. 

Sanitation. 

Headquarters. Ancon. 
Col. W. C. Gorgas, Chief Sanitary Officer. 
Capt. Robert E Noble U. S. A . Executive Officer. 
Harry E. Bovay. Chief Clerk. 

H. R. Carter, Director of Hospit'ds. Aucon. 

Surgeon. J. C. Perry. P. H. and M. H. S., Chief 
Quarantine Officer. Aucon. 

Maj. John L. Phillips. U. S. A., Superintendent 
Ancon Hospital, Ancon. 

Capt. Alexander Murray. U. S. A.. Assistiint to 
Superintendent. 

Maj. C. C. McCuHoch. jr.. U. S. A., General In- 
spector. Ancon. 

J. F. Leys. U. S. N.. Superintendent Colon 
HospiUil. Colon. 

Surgeon Claude C. Pierce. P. H. and M. H. S. 
Quarantine Officer. Colon. 

Dr. Fleetwood Gruver. P. H.and M.H.S., Quar- 
antine Officer. Panama. 

Dr. A. E. Mayner. Acting Health Officer. Pan- 
ama. 

Dr. M. E. Connor, Health Officer. Colon. 

Joseph A. I.ePrince, Chief Sanitary Inspector, 
Ancon. 

Disbursements. 

Headquarters, Flmpire. 
Edward J. Williams. Disbursing Officer. 
Wm. M. Wood, Assistant Disbursing Officer. 

Hxamination of Accounts. 

Headquarters. Empire. 
W. W. Warwick, Examiner of Accounts, 
Thomas L- Clear, Chief Clerk. 



PurcHasing Department. 

Headquarters, Washington. D. C. 
Capt. F. C. Boggs. U. S. A., General Pur- 
chasing Officer. 

C. E. Dole. Chief Clerk. 

Capt. Courtland Nixon. Purchasing Agent on 
the Isthmus. 

Maj. Wendell L- Simpson, U. S. A.. Purchas- 
ing Agent. 24 StTte Street. New York City. 

F. c Nordsiek, Assistant Purchasing Agent. 24 
State street. New York City. 

S. F;. Kedfern, Assistant Purchasing Agent. 
Custom House. New Orleans, La. 



Panama Railroad Company. 

Headquarters. Colon, 
(New York office. 24 State Street.) 
H. J. Slifer, Assistant to the President, and 
General Manager. Colon. 
G. E. Geer. Assistant to the General Manager. 
R. Budd. Chief Engineer, 
J. A. Smith. Superintendent. 



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS. 



The following is a list of the sailings of the Pan- 
ama Railroad Steamship Company, of the Royal 
Mail Steam Packet Company, of the Hamburg- 
,\inerican Line, and of the United Fruit Company's 
Line, the Panama Railroad Company's dates being 
subject to change; 

FROM NEW YORK TO COLON. 

Advance P. R. R.Monday Nov. 2 

Allianca P. R. R.Saturdoy Nov. 7 

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm...H.-A Saturday Nov. 7 

Colon P. R. R.Thursday .. ..Nov. 12 

Magdalena R.-M Saturday Nov. 14 

Panama P. R. R.Tuesday Nov. 17 

Prinz Joachi.n H.-A Saturday Nov. 21 

Finance P. R. R.Monday Nov. 23 

Orinoco R.-M Saturday Nov. 28 

Advance P. R. R.Saturday Nov. 28 

Allianca P. R. R.Thursday Dec. 3 

Prluz Aug. Wilhelm...H.-A Saturday Dec. 5 

Colon P. R. R.Tuesday Dec. 8 

Atrato R.-M Saturday Dec. 12 

Panama P. R. R.Monday Dec. 14 

Finance P. R.R.Saturday Dec. 19 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Saturday Dec. 19 

Advance P. R. R.Thursday Dec, 24 

Trent R.-M Saturday Dec. 26 

Allianca P. R. R.Tuesday Dec. 29 

All the steamers of the Hamburg- American and 
Royal Mail lines call at Kingston enroute to Colon. 

FROM COLON TO NEW YORK. 

Esperauza P. R. R.Tuesday Nov. 3 

Finance P. R. R.Monday Nov. 9 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Tuesday Nov. 10 

Advance P. R. R.Sunday Nov. 15 

Orinoco R.-M Tuesday Nov. 17 

Allianca P. R. R.Friday Nov. 20 

Prinz Aug. Wilhelni...H.-A Tuesday Nov. 24 

Colon P. R. R.Wednesday ..Nov. 25 

Panama P. R. R.Monday Nov. 30 

Atrato R.-M Tuesday Dec. 1 

Finance P. R. R.Suuday Dec. 6 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Tuesday Dec. 8 

Advance P. R. R.Friday Dec. 11 

Trent R.-M Tuesday Dec. 15 

Allianca P. R. R. Wednesday ..Dec. 16 

Colon P. R. R.Monday Dec. 21 

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm..H.-M Tuesday Dec. 22 

Panama P. R. R.Sunday Dec. 37 

Tagus R.-M Tuesday Dec. ^9 

Finance P. R. R.Friday Jan. 1 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Tuesday Jan. 5 

Advance P. R. R.Wednesday ..Jan. 6 

Allianca P. R. R.Monday Jan. 11 

FROM NEW ORLEANS TO COLON. 

Heredia U.F.C.. Saturday Nov. 7 

Cartago U.F.C.Satuniay Nov. 14 

Parismina U.F.C.. Saturday Nov. 21 

Heredia U.F'.CSaturday Nov. 28 

FROM COLON TO NEW ORLE.VNS. 

Parismina U.F.C.. Tuesday . .*. .Nov. 10 

Heredia U.F.C.. Tuesday Nov. 17 

Cartago U.F.C.. Tuesday Nov. 24 

Parismina U.F.C.Tuesday Dec. 1 

FROM COLO.V TO BARBADOS, CALLING AT TRINIDAD. 

Tagus R.-M Tuesday Nov. 10 

Magdalena R.-M Tuesday Nov. 24 

Orinoco R.-M Tuesday Dec. S 

.\trato R.-M Tuesday Dec. 22 

Trent R.-M Tuesday Jan. 5 

FROM COLON TO NEW ORLE.A.NS VIA KINGSTON. 

Jamaican Leyland Line, .about.. Nov. 22 

Antillian Leyland X,ine.. about.. Nov. 30 



CANAL 




RECORD 



Volume II. 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1908. 



No. 11. 



The Canal Record 



Published weekly under the authority and supervision of the 
ISTHMIAN CANAL COMMISSION 



"The Canal Record'^ is issued J ree oj charge, one 
copy each, to all employes of the Commission and Pan- 
ama /Railroad Company ivhose names ate on the"so/d^'' 
roll. Extra copies and back tiumbers can be obtained 
from the neivs stands of the Patiama /Railroad Cotn- 
^any for five cents each. 



Address all Communications 

THE CANAL RECORD 

Ancon, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama. 

No communication, either Jor Publication or reqitest- 
ing information, will receii^e attention unless signed 
with the Jiill name and address of the writer. 

NOTES OF PROGRESS. 

Dredging Curiosities. 

The dipper dredge JSIole is having an in- 
teresting experience in deepening the chan- 
nel alongside the Panama Railroad Com- 
pany's wharf. In one day last week the 
material taken from the bottom included, 
in addition to rock and silt, coffee, sugar, 
shoes, nails, boiler tubing, hemp and wre 
cable, canned goods, railroad rails, and a 
variety of other material that had been 
dropped into the water in the process of 
loading or unloading. As much of this 
material as could not be handled b}- the 
dredge was taken out by other methods and 
some of it is now stored on a lighter along- 
side the La Boca marine shop. The channel 
alongside the wharf will be deepened to — 38. 

Ladder dredge No. 7/ of the Pacificdredg- 
ing fleet, which has been working on the 
west side of the Canal, opposite the La Boca 
marine shop, struck a ledge of rock at — 17 
last week and further dredging in that lo- 
cality became impossible, as the rock was 
too hard to handle with a ladder dredge and 
was too near the surface at dead low water 
fir the dredge to work over it. Dredge No. 
14 is now working on the east side of the 
Canal on the wa>- to Miraflorcs. 



Worli at Gatun Dam. 

The rock toe at the upstream or south end 
of Gitun Dam is almost up to the elevation 
decided on, that is, 60 feet above sea level. 
The toe is constructed of Bas Obi.spo rock 
and runs gradually up to its highest point. 
It extends from the old line of the Panama 
railroad to the spillway. When completed 
the toe will be at an elevation of sixty feet 
along its entire length, that is, clear across 
the valley. This toe is not the dam proper, 
but is only a retaining wall for the dredged 
material which will form the dam. Beyond 
the spillway channel a dump has been 



started along the west diversion of the Chag- 
res River, extending from the line of the 
rock toe southward to the limit of the fill it 
is proposed to make on this toe. The toe 
can not be extended across the west di- 
version until the concrete work in the spill- 
way is finished above the high water line of 
the river. 

Spoil from the cut at Mindi is being 
dumped on the north toe of the dam, and 
this toe also is assuming something of the 
appearance it will have when completed. 
The dump will be extended clear across the 
valley and so far north that it will include 
the ground on which the Gatun Island ho- 
tel is located. Between these two toes, a 
distance of 1,700 feet, the hydraulic fill will 
be made, or, in other words, the dam proper 
will be located. 

The unwatering of the old bed of the 
Chagres, between the two toes, is almost 
completed and it will be possible in a few 
weeks to begin the work of scraping the 
layer of silt from the bottom. The whole 
dim site will be cleared of the loose earth 
covering before the hydraulic fill is begun. 



Locomotives for Porto Bello. 

Ten small locomotives for use in the stone 
quarries at Porto Bello arrived o\\ the Isth- 
mus last week and were loaded on barges, 
and have been towed to Porto Bello. They 
came from H. J. Porter & Co., of Pittsburg, 
and were sent to the Isthmus knocked down. 
They will be erected at Porto Bello. The 
locomotives are of the general type used in 
such service in the United States. They 
have a 3-foot 6-inch gauge, wheels 40 inches 
in diameter, cylinders 50 inches by 20 inches, 
and boilers carrying 160 pounds pressure. 
The}- will work from the quarry to the stone 
crusher, on a grade of from 2 '/a to 3 per cent 
on a 20-degree construction track. They are 
equipped with an air brake rigging. It is 
believed the\' will be in service by the mid- 
dle of December. 



New Corozal Road. 

Work on the new highway from Panama 
to Corozil is well under way. The road bed 
has been practically all graded, 12,030 cubic 
yards having been moved during October. 
The road leaves the Sabanas road about 
4,000 feet (three quarters of a mile) from 
the Caledonia bridge, Panama, and the dis- 
tance from' the Sabanas road to Corozal sta- 
tion is 17,000 feet, about three and one 
quarter miles, making the distance from 
Caledonia bridge, Panama, to Corozal station 
almost exactly four miles. The governing 
grade is three per cent, with short stretches 
at a steeper grade at a few hills. The road- 
bed is 11 feet wide with a ditch 4 feet wide 
on each side, makingthe width of the right 
of wa5' 30 feet. 

The macadam section of the road will be 
6 inches thick and 16 feet wide. Crushed 



stone from Rio Grande is being used. It is 
delivered on the road b_v a spur track from the 
Panama railroad, at a point about one and a 
half miles from Corozal at the highest point 
on the road, thus giving the wagons dis- 
tributing the stone a down hill haul in both 
directions. About 1,200 feet of stone have 
been spread and a steam roller will begin 
work this week. It is thought the road will 
be completed in a few months. 

October Record of Track Shifters. 

The five track shifting machines in the 
Central Division during the month of Octo- 
ber moved a total of 41.5,858 feet, or 78.8 
miles of track. In the Tabernilla district 
track shifter No. 5 moved 110,200 feet or 
20.9 miles, and No. 8 moved 70,064 feet or 
13.3 miles. Track shifter No. 7 moved 
121,076 feet in the Gorgona district and 
4,158 feet in the Empire district, a total of 
125,234 feet, or 23.7 miles. No. 9 shifted 
39,212 feet of track on the Miraflores dumps 
and 6,388 feet in the Empire district, a total 
of 45,600 feet or 8.6 miles. No. 6 shifted 
58,160 feet of track on the La Boca dumps 
and 6,600 feet in the Empire district, a total 
of 64,760 feet or 12.2 miles. Of the total 
of 415,858 feet of track shifted, 180,264 feet 
or 34.2 miles, were moved in the Tabernilla 
district, 121,076 feet, or 22.9 miles, in the 
Gorgona district; 17,146 feet or 3.2 miles in 
the Empire district: 39,212 feet or 7.4 miles 
on the Miraflores dumps, and 58,160 feet or 
11 miles on the La Boca dumps. 

Ne-ve Record for Ladder Dredges. 

A new dredging record was established 
for ladder dredges in the month of October, 
when the ladder dredge No. 1 of the Atlan- 
tic dredging fleet excavated 168,796 cubic 
yards of material. The best previous record 
for ladder dredges was made in March by 
the Gop/wr of the Pacific dredging fleet, 
which took out 168,375 cubic yards. No. I, 
the dredge that now holds the record, was 
working during October in the channel in 
Limon Bay and the material handled was a 
mixture of mud and rock. 

The grand total of material excavated bj^ 
the dredges in October was below that of 
previous months owing to several of the 
dredges being laid up for repairs. A com- 
parison shows: 

Ch. Yds. Cu. Yds. 

March 1,330,167 August 1.375.991 

July 1 ,321.667 September 1.374.856 

October 1.2;i.l36 

This comparison does not take into con- 
sideration a certain amount of dredging done 
each month that is not counted as Canal 
excavation. For instance, in October, a 20- 
iuch suction dredge working in the channel 
to the Gatun handling docks took out 57,638 
cubic yards of material which was not 
counted in the total of Canal excavation. 
This performance is noteworthy because the 



82 



THE CANAL RECORD 



NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



{Continued). 



dredge is handling a very hard clay which 
resists the Galveston cutter much as rubber 
would. The material is taken out in lumps 
as large as a man's fist, the character of 
the dredging being much more difficult than 
the dredge was designed to do. With this 
exception the dredges of the Atlantic Divi- 
sion were working in the Canal pri.sm in 
Limon Bay, or in the channel already made 
in the shore of the bay. Lidder dredge 
No. 6 was taking out earth and rock, the 
dipper dredges Chagres and Mindi, were 
working in earth and rock, and the new 20- 
inch suction dredge. No. S5, was working 
in silt. The new suction dredge worked only 
the latter pirtof the month, and the sea-going 
suction dredge A neon was laid up 18 work- 
ing days for general repairs. The October 
records for the Atlantic Division follow: 



working in a secure position. Tliere has 
been fear of stornii darinj tha dry season, 
which come from the north and northeast, 
but the storm of Thursday niglit came from 
the northwest and was most unusual at this 
season. 

Conditions at Porto Bello are such that 
rock can be delivered whenever it is wanted. 
In fact it is believed thit the deliveries will 
begin about January 1, when it is proposed 
to start the concrete work in the spillway. 



T^aflfler. No. 1 

Ladder. No. 6 

Dipper. Ch,-i(rres 

Dipner. Mitidi 

2n-iTlch Suction. No.. ^2. 

2f-inch .Suction . No. .S.S 

Sea-eoing Suction. An- 

con 



Cubic Yards. 



Earth. Rock. 



16S.796 
7l.fi7') 

3.1 .snn 

21.0S2 
57.6.^!! 
26.403 

128.700 I 



Total. 



31.S6R 

1.S50 

21.382 



lfiS,7<)6 
101,547 
35.350 
42.4';4 
57.63S 
26,403 

12S,700 



Total .1 507.798 1 55.100 I .5fi2.SQS 

The Pacific dredging fleet was also ham- 
pered in its work by repairing to three of 
the dredges. The ladder dredge Mole did 
not begin work in October until the evening 
of the 19th. The ladder dredge No. 14\va.s 
laid up four days, and the dipper dredge, 
three days. The reco rd follows: 



Dredge. 



Cubic Yards, 



Earth. 



Culebra 

I,.idder. (".opher 

T^ndder, No. 14 

I^ndder. Mole 

Dipper 

20-inch Suction, Sand- 
piper 



Total . 



431 ,5.37 
103,514 

not clas'^ 
56.3f0 

not class 

24.593 



Rock. 



(a) 
not class. 



Total. 



431.5,37 
103.514 

89.391 

56..340 

60.501 (W 

24.593 



(nl About 2 per cent of this material wa? rock. 

(*1 Three thousind .six hundred yards of this were 
taken from out<ide the prism at the Panama R.iilroad 
Company's coal dock. 

Accident to the <_ocoli. 

The tug Cocoli of the Pacific fleet struck 
a submerged pile in the harbor of La Boca, 
October 20. The pile jammed into the pro- 
peller and broke the shaft off close up to 
the wheel. The tug was towed to the beach 
at Flamenco Island where she was beached, 
the shaft taken out, and the hole plu,gged 
up. She was then brought to the machine 
shop where the shaft was welded and a spare 
wheel was put on. 

Preparing for Gatun Concrete Work. 
A little below the line of the north toe 
of Gatun Dam a 20-inch suction dredges is 
making the channel to the site of the docks 
at which material for the locks will be stored 
and handled. 

A few days ago the 16-inch suction dredge 
that had been used in the Colon district was 
taken to Nombre de Dios, where it is to be 
used for <lelivering sand to barges whidi 
will tow it to the concrete handling plant at 
Gatun. Darin? a severe norther on Thurs- 
day night last the dredgje was sunk in six 
feet of water. There is a good harbor at 
Nombre de Dios, but the dredge was not 



Proposals for Corozal Schoolhouse. 

Sealed proposals will be received at the 
office of the Purchasing Agent, Isthmian 
Canal Commission, Mount Hope, Canal 
Zone, untU 11 a. in., Tue.sdav, November 17, 
190S, when they will be publicly open<l. for 
the erection by contract of a two room school- 
house at Corozal, Canal Zone. The Com- 
mission will furnish all materials at the site 
of the work, and the contractor is required 
to provide all labor. Plans and specifications 
can be obtained upon application to the 
architect, Culebra. A deposit of |5 is re- 
quired to insure their return. 

Each bidder must accompany his proposal 
with a check, cash or money order for $50, 
as a guarantee that contract will be entered 
into, and the successful bidder will be re- 
quired to deposit #250 conditioned upon the 
faithful performance of the contract. 

The Commission reserves the right to re- 
ject any or all proposals or to accept any 
proposal as may be deemed to its interest, 
and to waive defects or informalities in pro- 
posals. 

October Police Report. 
The October report of the Chief of Police 
shows that 489 persons, representinsr 4+ 
countries, were arrested in the Canal Zone 
during the month. This is a decrease of 
150 for the montli, there having been 639 
arrests in September. Of the 489 persons 
arrested, 450 were men and 39 were women, 
and they were charged with 57 diffei-ent of- 
fenses. They were divided among tlie towns 
of the Zone as follows: Aucon, 35; Las Sa- 
banas, 3; La Boca, 27; Corozal, 12; Pedro Mi- 
guel, 8; Miraflores, 5; Paraiso, 23; Culebra, 
41; Empire, 82; LasCascadas, 15; BasObispo, 
11; Gorgona, 63; San Pablo, 12; Tabernilla, 
22; Frijoles, 2; Bohio, 5; Gatun, 37; Cri.'^to- 
bal, 85. An outpost of the Tabernilla police 
station was established at Frijoles on Octo- 
ber 1, and was made a Sep irate station 
in charge of a first-class policeman on Octo- 
ber 11. The total effective police force on 
October 31 was 162, and the pay roll amounted 
to ,$22,235.59. 

Sixty-seven cases were trif d in the courts, 
12 of which were dismissed, 43 continued, 
and 12 in which convictions were secured. 
Of the 12 persons convicted, 2 were fined, 
1 received a jail sentence, 8 were sentenced 
to the penitentiary, for one year each, and 
one person forfeited his bail. Seven con- 
victs were discharged from the penitentiary 
during the month, leaving a total of 113 in 
the penitentiary on October 31. The number 
of district prisoners on the same date was 
129, a decrease of 91 for the month. The 
value of work performed by convicts on 
roads, etc., was $1,949.80 There were 17 
deaths by violence requiring action by the 
coroner during the month. Nine of these 
deaths were caused by explosions of dyna- 
mite, three by railroad accidents, and two 
by drowning. 



HE \LTH REPORT FOR OCTOBE.<. 

Eteellent Health Cunditions. 
Ancon, C. Z., November 10, 1908. 
To the Acting Chairman and Chiff F.nsinrer, Isth- 
mian Canal Commission , Culebra, Canal Zone. 
Sir: I herewith forward the report of the 
Department of Sanitation for the month of 
Octoiier, 190S: 

The liealth conditions upon the whole are, 
I think, most excellent, though the sick rate 
has not fallen this year as it has done in 
previous years. The rates for the past three 
years, comparing September and October, 
are as follows. 

,, ^. „ Constantly Rate per 

Mouth. Force. ^j^,^ thousand. 

19U5— September. . 2^.264 1.0S4 37.74 

October 25,445 857 33.62 

1907— .September. . 41.062 1.141 27.78 

October 41,113 1,105 26.90 

1903— September.. 4i.05& 1.130 25.09 

October 43,593 1.112 26.66 

You will see from this table that both the 
number of sick and the rate is larger in Oc- 
tober than in September. The rever.se 
occurred in the preceding two years. 

The death rate of the force makes a very 
good showing. The total rate from all 
causes being 12.93, but of this only 7.70 was 
due to disease. Comparing the four years 
as to the deaths due to disease, we have the 
following: 

Month. Force. Deaths. Rate. 

1905— October 22.000 60 32.72 

1906— October 25,443 90 42.44 

1907— October 41,113 81 23.64 

1908— October 43,593 28 7.70 

That is, the death rate from disease in the 
force during the past October is just about 
one-sixth of what it was in 1906. 

The malarial conditions, however, for Oc- 
tober were not as good as in September, as 
the following table shows. This table is made 
up from employes admitted to hospitals: 

Month. Force. No. of cases. tj,ousand. 

1908— September.. 45,058 1,410 31-29 

October 43.593 1.822 41.79 

From this table you will see that with a 
smaller force we had 412 more cases of ma- 
laria in October than in September. Tak- 
ing the past three years, and, considering 
October, we have the following : 

^ .- r Rate per 

Month. Force, No. of cases, thousand. 

1906-October 25.445 1,912 75,11 

1907- October 41,113 1,596 33.81 

19DS— October 43.593 1,822 41.79 

We have had no case of yellow fever since 
May, 1906, though it exists at several points 
north and south of us. There has been no 
case of bubonic plague since August, 1905, 
though it is occurring at Guayaquil on one 
side of us and at La Guayra on the other. 
We have had no case of sniall-pox within 
the past year. 

Very respectfully yours, 

W. C. GORGAS, 
Chic J Sanitary Officer. 

The Lobnitz subaqueous rock breaker, 
which is being erected at the La Boca marine 
shops, was launched at noon, November 5. 
The work of installing the boiler, engines, 
and ram is now in progress. 

At Miraflores dumps in October the three 
Lidgerwood unloaders of the Central Divi- 
sion unloaded respectively, 181, 208, and 
214 trains, a total of 603 trains, of seventeen 
20-vard cars each. The material thus 
haiidled equals 205,020 yards car measure- 
ment. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



83 



THANKSGIVING. 

The President's Proclamation. 

By the Pfcsidfnf of the United States of America: A 
Proctamat ion . 

Once aq^ain the season is at hand when, 
accarding to the ancient custom of our 
people, it becomes the duty of the President 
to appoint a day of prayer and of thanks- 
giving to God. 

Year by year this nation grows in strength 
and worldly power. During the century and 
a quarter that has elapsed since our entry 
into the circle of independent peoples we 
have grown and prospered in material things 
to a degree never known before, and not 
now known in any other country. The thir- 
teen colonies which struggled along the sea- 
coast of the Atlantic and were hemmed in 
but a few miles west of tidewater by the 
Indian-haunted wilderness, have been trans- 
formed into the mightiest republic which 
the world has ever seen. Itsdjmains stretch 
across the continent from one to the other 
of the two greatest oceans, and it exercises 
dominion alike in the .\rctic and tropic 
realms. The growth in wealth and popu- 
lation has surpassed even the growth in 
territory. Nowhere else in the wjrld is the 
averas;e of individual comfort and material 
■wtll-being as high as in our fortunate land. 

For the very reason that in material well- 
being we have thus abounded, we ow; it to 
the ."Vlmighty to show equal progress in moral 
and spiritual things. With a nation, as with 
individuals who make up a nation, material 
well-being is an indispensable foundation. 
But the foundation avails nothing by itself. 
That life is wasted, and worse than wa-ited, 
which is spent in piling, heap upon heap, 
those things which minister merely to the 
pleasure of the body and to the power that 
rests only on wealth. Upon material well- 
being as a foundation must be raised the 
structure of the lofty life of the spirit if this 
nation is properly to fulfill its great mission 
and to accomplish all that we so ardently 
hope and desire. The things of the body 
are good; the things of the intellect better; 
but best ofall are thethings of thesoul; for, 
in the nation, as in the individual, in the 
long run it is character that counts. Let us, 
therefore, as a people set our faces resolutely 
against e\-il, and with broad charity, with 
kindliness and good will toward all men, 
but with unflinching determination to smite 
down wrong, strive with all the strength 
that is given us for righteousness in public 
and in private life. 

Now, therefore, I, Theodore Roosevelt, 
President of the United States, da set apart 
Thursday, the 26th day of November next, 
as a day of general thanksgiving and prayer, 
and on that day I recommend that the 
people shall cease from their daily work, 
and, in their homes or in their churches, 
meet devoutly to thank the .Almighty for 
the many and great blessings they hive re- 
ceived in the past, and to pray that they may 
be given strength so to order their lives as 
to deserve a continuation of these blessings 
in the future. 

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set 
my hand and caused the seal of the United 
States to be aiSxed. 

Done at the city of Washington this thirty- 
first da\' of October, in the year of our Lord 



one thousand uin? hundred and eight, and 
of the indepmldnce of the United States 
the one hundred and thirty-third. 

Theodore Roosevelt. 

By the President: 
Al^'ey A, Adee, Actins S^.cretaiy of State. 



Culebra Bsaclied for Repairs, 

While turning in the new channel at La 
Boca, about two months ago, the port pro- 
peller wheel of the dred.re Culebra struck a 
reef, and three of the blades were broken. 
Since that time it has been working with the 
damaged wheel. As there is no dry dock on 
the Pacific side of the Isthmus large enough 
to dock a vessel of the size of the Culebra it 
was necessary to beach her in order to put 
on a new propellor wheel. This was done 
on Naos Island at high tide on the morning 
of November 8. The old wheel was taken 
off at low tide and a new wheel put on at 
the next low tide. The vessel was floated 
at high tide on Mondaj' morning and re- 
sumed her work in the afternoon, after coal- 
ing at La Boca. 



Canal Zone Schools. 

The second meeting of the teachers of the 
Canal Zone Public Schools was held in the 
Ancon school building, Saturday, Novem- 
ber 7. There were present twenty -two white 
and twenty colored teachers, the teachers 
in the white schools meeting in the morning 
from 9 to 12 o'clock, and the teachers in the 
colored schools meeting in the afternoon 
from 2 to 5 o'clock. 

.According to the general plans for work 
in tliese meetings the first part of each ses- 
sion was devoted to a discussion of problems 
connected with schoolroom organization and 
class management, and the second part was 
given over to a discussion of the contents of 
the different subjects in the present curric- 
ulum and the methods of teaching them, 
special emphasis being placed upan the sub- 
ject of reading. As a basis for the work 
of the second part of each session of the 
meetings, the teachers had prepared before- 
hand an assignment in "McMurray's Method 
of the Recitation" on the subject of read- 
ing. The larger part of the time was given 
to discussing those difficulties in reading 
which are peculiar to the schools of the Zone. 

In the session for the white teachers, con- 
sideration was given to the monthly reports 
made out by the teachers, and to a method 
for avoiding the frequent lo^s in time to the 
c'lildren, consequent upon the numerous 
trin-.fers that are made from school to school 
in the Zone. 

In the meeting of the colored teachers 
most of the first part of the session was 
given over to a discussion of devices and 
methods for increasing the percentage of 
attendance and for avoiding the present 
great amount of tardiness. 

The school for white children opened Oc- 
tober 1, and the total attendance for the 
month of October, 22 school days, was as 
follows; Cristobal, 1,959; Empire, 1,498; 
Ancon, 1,405; Gorgona, 1,338; Culebra, 1.257; 
Las Cascadas, 9341/2; Golon Beach, 1MV2\ 
Gatun, 59S'/2; Pedro Miguel, 491: Paraiso, 
461 Vb- The daily average for the highest 
week's attendance for the combined schools 
was 509. 

The schools for colored children also 
opened October 1, and the following was 
the total attendance for the month: Cristo- 



bal, 2,317; Culebra, 2,0)4</2; Empire, 2.0S4; 
Gorgona. 1, 5291/2; Matachin, 1,362; Mount 
Hope, 9751/2; Paraiso, 89S1/2; Bohio, 7S7, Ta- 
bernilla, 729; San Pablo, 5731/2; Pleva de 
Flor, 5501/2; La Boci, 5O51/2; Cruces, '5271/2; 
Las Sabanas, 265V'2. The daily average for 
the highest week's attendance for the com- 
bined schools was 785. 

The average daily attendance for October, 
1907, was: White children, 243; w-hite and 
colored children combined, 880. 

There are two high schools on the Zone, 
Culebra, with a class of 11, and Cristobal, 
with a class of 9. Of the 11 pupils at Cule- 
bra, 5 are from Empire, 3 from Ancon, 2 
from Culebra, and 1 from Pedro Miguel. 
Of the 9 pupils at Cristobal, 3 are from Gor- 
gona, 2 from Gatun, 2 from Cristobal, 1 
from San Pablo, and 1 from Colon. In 
October. 1907, there were five pupils enrolled 
in the high school, and, at the close of 
October, 1908, there were 20 enrolled. 

Owing to the unexpected increase in num- 
ber of pupils, the shortage of high school 
te.xt books, and the insufficient time in which 
to obtain teachers fitted for the work, the 
range of .studies has been somewhat re- 
stricted. However, it has been arranged so 
that each pupil has four subjects not before 
studied. 

La Boca Outfall Sewrer. 

The outfall of the sewer at La Boca has 
been moved, as it was surrounded in its old 
location by the dumps at that place. A trench 
was dug under the railroad tracks to Pan- 
ama Bay, the outfall pipe was laid in the 
bottom of the trench and co.-ered with 
concrete, the concrete covering being used 
as the floor of an open culvert built in the 
same trench to which all the surface drain- 
age in La Boca is carried, as the old French 
drains and those built by the Department of 
Sanitation are connected with the new outlet. 



Isthmian Baseball League. 

A meeting of the Isthmian Baseball League 
was held at Empire on Sunday, November 9. 
It was decided to have a league of four 
teams, consisting of Ancon, Empire, Gor- 
gona, and Motive Power and Machinery of 
Culebra. The league will open on the 20th 
of December, and the number of playing 
dates will be 30. The next meeting will be 
held in the office of the president of the 
league at Culebra on Sunday, November 15, 
and an election of officers will take place at 
that time. 



Indoor Baseball. 

The I. O. R. H. indoor baseball team of 
Cristobal desires to arrange games with other 
indoor baseball teams on the Isthmus. The 
members, all of whom are under nineteen 
years of age, are: San ford MacSparren, Har- 
old Delevante, William Russell, George 
Smith, Ernest Wurdeman, David Russell, 
and Andrew Cartwright. KW communica- 
tions should be sent to Harold Delevante, 
secretary and treasurer, care of R. M. S. P. 
Co., Colon. 



The dipper dredge of the Pacific dredging 
fleet at La Boca has been taken off the work 
in the Canal prism and is dredging a chan- 
nel at the new unloading dock for the ships 
of the Union Oil Company. The channel 
will be 600 feet long, 120 feet wide, and 38 
feet deep at mean tide. 



84 



THE CANAL RECORD 



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE. 

Women's Clubs and Other Features. 

The Hallow-e'en entertainment given Oc- 
tober 31 by the Pedro Miguel Social and 
Recreation Club, assisted by the Woman's 
Club was one of the most enjoyable affairs 
that have been given in the club room. A 
number of guests from Paraiso and other 
points on the line were present. The club 
rooms were decorated with palms and bunt- 
ing for the occasion. A program consisting 
of a little comedy by members of the 
Woman's Club, .songs, recitations and other 
musical selections was given. Simple re- 
freshments were served, and the evening 
ended with a dance. 

The two clubs are combining again in the 
arrangements for a bazaar to be given in the 
club rooms, November 14. Fancy articles, 
suitable for Christmas gifts, cakes, and 
candies will be sold, other features will be 
a gipsy booth, weighing scales, and a 
special booth for children. The proceeds of 
the sale vpill be entirely devoted to the 
Christmas fund. 

The Culebra Woman's Club held its regu- 
lar meeting with election of ofEcer.s on 
Thursday, November 5, when the following 
officers were elected: President, Mrs. E. M. 
Pullen, re-elected; vice-president, Mrs. W. 
P. Wheeler; secretary, Mrs. Wm. H. Bulter, 
re-elected; treasurer, Mrs. Robert Wheeler. 
These officers will serve for one year. The 
club has reduced its dues to one dollar a 
year. Entertainments will be organized 
from time to time in order to keep thetrea- 
surj' in a sound condition. 

The study class began its work with 
11 members, Mrs. Frank M. Miracle lead- 
ing. Classes will begin at 4 o'clock on club 
days. The club meets on the first and third 
Thursday of each month, at 3 o'clock, be- 
ginning promptly. Mrs. E. M. Pullen, 
the president, is still away on her vacation, 
but is expected to return about the middle 
of the present month. 

A box part}- and dance will be given by 
the Roman Catholic women of Culebra at 
the Commission clubhouse on Thursday 
evening, November 12, at 8 o'clock, for the 
benefit of the church of the Holy Redeemer, 
now in course of erection at Culebra. 

On Tuesda}' evening, November 17, 1908, 
the degree team of Alfretta Council, No. 1, 
Degree of Pocahontas of Improved Order of 
Red Men, will give a homemade pie social, 
followed by a dance, in Fraternal Hall at 
Culebra. Friends are cordially invited, and 
a good time is assured. 

The Cristobal Woman's Club held its reg- 
ular literary meeting on Wednesday, Novem- 
ber 4, the second vice-president in the 
chair. The reports of the different depart- 
ments were read, and announcements made, 
the routine business being followed with 
a paper by Mrs. E. Lewis Baker, chair- 
man of the art and literature department. 
A social half hour was enjo3ed by the mem- 
bers at the close of the program. The 
meeting ri the home department was held 
at the residence of the chairman, Mrs. H.J. 
Slifer, on Monday, November 9. The date 
of the next literary meeting isNovember 18, 
when the program, under the direction of 
the educational department, will consist of 
an address by the Superintendent of Schools:, 
Prof. Henry Lester Smith. The address 
will be followed by a general discussion. 



The department has extended a cordial in- 
vitation to all mothers who have children 
in the school to attend this meeting. 

The Paraiso Woman's Club is to be reor- 
ganized. The women of the community 
have taken the matter up and it will proba- 
bl)- be effected before the end of the month. 

The Las Cascadas Woman's Club met at 
the residence of Mrs. C. F. Merry on Thurs- 
day afternoon, November 6. Committees 
for the month were appointed as follows: 
Entertainment, Mrs. Naylor, Mrs. Stanton, 
Mrs. Drysdale, Mrs. Bowers; visiting, Mrs. 
Decher, Mrs. Grimmison. The opening of 
the clubhouse will be marked by a dance or 
other entertainment, in charge of the com- 
mittee for the month. It has been decided 
to suspend the regular meeting which falls 
on November 26, Thanksgiving Day. The 
club has sent for a number of the Shake- 
speare plays and will devote a part of the 
year to general reading. 

The social societies represented at Las 
Cascadas, include the Masonic Club, Knights 
of Pythias, the Kangaroos, Brotherhood of 
Locomotive Engineers, the Order of Railway 
Conductors, the Men's Social Club, and 
the Woman's Club, and in addition a 
flourishing Union Sunday school. 

The Ancon Woman's Club held its regular 
meeting on Wednesday, November 4, the 
president in the chair. The reports of the 
different heads of departments show that 
the club is doing good work. The philan- 
thropy department reported its first regular 
visit, an inspection of the San Bias Indian 
Industrial School, made on Saturday morn- 
ing, November 7. Nearly all the members 
of the department attended, and there were 
a few guests. The school is in charge of 
the Christian Brothers. The pupils, of whom 
there are 17, are given school training, in- 
struction in manual work and athletic exer- 
cises. 

The next visit of the philanthropy depart- 
ment will be to the home for aged men and 
women sometime within the month. The 
dates of the club bazaar have been placed 
for December 4 and 5, and the members 
are putting forth their best efforts toward 
the perfection of arrangements. 

The Gatun Sunshine Club will hold a 
sale of fancy and useful articles suitable for 
Christmas gifts, on Monday evening, No- 
vember 23, at the Commission hotel. Ice 
cream and homemade cake will be served 
and an entertainment will be given. 

The Tivoli Club will give its regular semi- 
monthly dance on vSaturday night, Novem- 
ber 14, at the Hotel Tivoli, Ancon. 

On Sunday morning at 11 o'clock, theVen. 
Archdeacon Bryan will preach and celebrate 
Holy Communion in the Union church at 
Culebra. Services will also be held at 4 
o'clock m the afternoon. 



Canal Zone Humane Society. 
A meeting was held at the residence of the 
Ven. Archdeacon H. B. Bryan, Ancon, on 
Friday evening, November 7, for the forma- 
tion of a humane society. The following 
officers were elected: President, Col. W. C. 
Gorgas; vice-president, Archdeacon Bryan; 
vice-^president-at-large. Miss Beattie; secre- 
tary, Mr. Charles F. Fondy; treasurer, Mr. 
J. S. Fearon; directors, Mrs. H. B. Brj'an, 
Mr. and Mrs. George Campen, Mr. Fondy, 
Archdeacon Bryan and others. The societj' 
will appoint secretaries and directors in the 



towns in the Zone. Directors' meetings 
will be held monthh' and the general society 
will meet once a j-ear. 

It is understood that the present Pan- 
aman administration is in sj'mpathy with 
the movement and will give all the support 
and assistance necessary to carrying out 
the work. 

PERSONAL, 

Maj. William L. Sibert and family, sailed 
from New York on X.\\e Allianca on Novem- 
ber 7, due at Cristobal on November 13. 

Mr. William Mitchell Bunker, who is a 
trustee of the Chamber of Commerce of San 
Francisco and the representative of that 
body at Washington during the sessions of 
Congress, accompanied b\- Mrs. Bunker, 
spent several days on the Isthmus during 
the past week. Mr. Bunker came to the 
Isthmus to -present to the Isthmian Canal 
Commission the wishes of the merchants of 
San Francisco in regard to furnishing com- 
missary supplies from California products. 

A. S. Zinn, Resident Engineer at Em- 
pire, accompanied by his famil)', sailed on 
the ParisiJiina on November 10, for a vaca- 
tion of six weeks, to be spent in Costa Rica. 

Mr. Edward Schildhauer, electrical and 
mechanical engineer, and Mrs. Schildhauer 
have returned to the Isthmus from Europe, 
where Mr. Schildhauer has been investigat- 
ing the mechanism of locks on canals in 
Great Britain, Germany, the Netherlands, 
and Belgium. 

Missing Men. 
Information is wanted in regard to Wil- 
liam Store}', an American, who came to the 
Isthmus three or four years ago from Ja- 
maici where he hid resided for two years. 
Anyone having knowledge concerning hira 
is requested to communicate with Frederick 
Escala, Cristobal, Canal Zone. 

Information is wanted in regard to Wil- 
liam or Wilheim E Wild or Ewalt, who at 
one time was emploj'ed as a cook on the 
Isthmus. Anyone having knowledge of him 
will communicate with the American Consul- 
General, Panama. 



Ancon Amusement Association. 

.\rrangements have been made with the 
Lambardi Opera Company, now appearing 
at the National Theater of Panama, for tickets 
for members of the Ancon Amusement Asso- 
ciation at two performances. 

The funds in the treasury of the associa- 
tion make it possible to secure one ticket for 
each bachelor member and two tickets for 
each married member, for each of the two 
performances. Additional tickets for any 
member can be secured at the reduced rate 
of $1.50 each. 

The association will attend on Tuesday 
evening, November 17, Faust, and on Thurs- 
d.iy evening, November 19, Traviata. The 
attention of members is called to the change 
in dates as given on the circulars sent to 
each member. 

Members who wish to attend either one or 
both performances, should inform at once 
Mr. Tom M. Cook, Ancon, Canal Zone, of 
the number of tickets desired. 

Tickets may be call ed for, or will be mailed 
if stamped addresse d envelope is furnished, 
and will be issued in the order in which 
applications are received. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



85 



CRUDE OIL AS FUEL. 

Delivery and Installations in the Canal 
Zone. 

By the 1st of Januar_v, 1909, practically all 
of the stationary boilers in the service ol the 
Isthmian Canal Commission will be using 
crude oil as fuel. It is estimated that the 
monthlj' consumption of oil at that time will 
have reached 24,080 barrels, and that the ac- 
tual saving to the Commission by substitut- 
ing oil for coal will be at least 65 per cent. 
Coal is now delivered on the Isthmus by 
the Panama Railroad Company for $6.35 a 
ton, and in the fiscal year ended June 30, 
1908, 31,292 tons of coal were used in the 
boilers in which oil is being used, those 
under the Mechanical Division. On a com- 
merical basis a barrel of the oil delivered 
to the Commission will generate as much 
steam as a quarter ton of coal, and as the 
oil costs 90 cents a barrel, the saving from 
a fuel point alone will be 56 per cent. In 
addition to this the fixed expenses, such as 
wages of firemen, etc., are considerably 
less. 

Oil is delivered on the Isthmus by the 
Union Oil Company of California, under a 
concession granted January 10, 1906, for the 
construction and operation of a pipe-line 
from the Pacific to the Atlantic side of the 
Isthmus over land owned by the United 
States and the Panama Railroad Company. 
This company had previoush- obtained, un- 
der date of October 30, 1905, a similar con- 
cession from the Government of Panama for 
the construction and maintenance of a pipe- 
line across the Isthmus for the purpose of 
conveying crude oil, and for the erection of 
pumping stations and storage tanks in the 
cities of Panama and Colon. The license 
granted b\' the Secretary of War is revocable 
at the will of the Government of the United 
States, and is conditioned upon the pa\'- 
ment of )J500, United States currency, 
a month, beginning August 1, 1906, into 
the Canal Zone Treasury, the fund thus 
created to be set aside for the support of the 
public schools of the Canal Zone. It is 
further stipulated in the grant that, if de- 
sired, the Isthmian Canal Commission or 
the Panama Railroad Company may pur- 
chase crude oil from the Union Oil Company 
of California at 90 cents. United States cur- 
rency, a barrel. In addition to the monthly 
payment of *500 to the Treasury of the Canal 
Zone, the Union Oil Company also pays $250 
to the Government of Panama, and is sub- 
ject to the usual Canal Zone taxes. 

The oil delivered on the Isthmus comes 
from the Santa Maria fields in San Luis 
Dbispo county, California. 

Its consistency is about the same as wa- 
ter, and it can be transported in a pipe- 
line as readily. It is piped from the field 
in San Luis Obispo county to Port Harford, 
where it is pumped into the Union Oil 
Company's tank steamers, of which there 
are fourteen serving points in Oregon, Wash- 
ington, Hawaii, Chile, and Guatemala, as 
well as Panama. Each ship has a capacity 
of about 52,000 barrels of 42 gallons to the 
barrel, and deliveries are made on the Isth- 
mus whenever required.. There are seven 
storage tanks in the Canal Zone, four at La 
Boca, at the Pacific entrance, and three at 
Mount Hope, near Colon. Each tank has a 
capacity of 37,500 barrels. An eighth tank 



of like capacity formerly located at Mount 
Hope was destroved by lightning on Mav 
13, 1908. 

The pipe-line through which the oil is 
pumped to the Atlantic side of the Isthmus 
follows the line of the Panama railroad, and 
is about 48 miles long. It is made of wrought 
steel pipe, 8 inches in diameter, and 5-16 of an 
inch thick, with gate valves at one-mile in- 
tervals, and without expansion joints. The 
pipe holds 15,000 barrels of oil. From sea- 
level to the summit near Culebra the total 
lift is about 225 feet, and the pumps are as- 
sisted by gravity from that point to the tanks 
at Mount Hope. At the summit the line 
runs along the edge of the Rio Grande 
reservoir, and at this point is encased in 
concrete, so that if the pipe should break the 
water would not be affected. It is tested to 
SOO pounds to the square inch, but a pressure 
of over 300 pounds is seldom used. 

A Dow compound pump, driven by steam 
from boilers in which crude oil is used, fur- 
nishes the pressure to pump the oil across 
the Isthnnis, and about 30 hours are con- 
sumed in the journey. The oil is so inelas- 
tic that it can be ascertained bj- the pul- 
sation in the plant at La Boca at what 
moment the valve of the tank at Mount 
Hope has been closed. As the pipe is laid 
on the surface of the ground, it follows 
rather a serpentine course, and the many 
curves help to overcome the expansion due 
to the uniformly hi.gh temperature in Pan- 
ama. The estimated investment of the Union 
Oil Company on the Isthmus in pipe-line 
and plant is'Sl,000,000. 

After some litigation, that followed imme- 
diately on the grant of the concession, had 
been disposed of the company was given 180 
days in which to lay its pipe. This was at a 
time when the work involved not only engi- 
neering features but also those of providing 
subsistence and quarters for the men engaged. 
The laying of the pipe was begun in several 
places simultaneously, and a large force of 
men was kept constantly at work, so that 
the company was read}- to deliver oil within 
the allotted time, although the line was not 
used throughout its entire len.gth until No- 
vember 14, 1907. For a time a section of 
the line from Mount Hope to Colon was 
used for delivering water to the latter place, 
pending the completion of the Commission's 
water line. 

■ During the first months only a few hun- 
dred barrels of oil were taken by the Com- 
mission, and this was used in the campaign 
against mosquitoes. The purchases at no 
time have been more than 14,000 barrels a 
month. 

On account of changes in the line of the 
Panama Railroad Company and in that of 
the Canal itself, the pipes have been shifted 
at many places and, according to the contract, 
all this work is done at the expense of the 
Union Oil Company. 

At fifteen pointson the Isthmus oil is now 
used as fuel and the installations will be con- 
tinued until all the stationary boilers are 
equipped. The method of equipment at the 
different stations is as follows: 

Six boilers are equipped for burning oil at 
the Cristobal ice plant. A brick arch is 
erected on the grates in each furnace and 
the grate bars are covered with broken brick. 
This arch and floor of broken brick form 
the combustion chamber into which the oil 
is discharged through a burner manufac- 



tured at Cristobal shops. This plant like 
all others on the Isthmus, uses steam for 
spraying the oil. The burners are placed on 
the dead plate near the fire door. 

M the Gatun pumping station two loco- 
motive-type boilers have been equipped for 
using oil. Each fire box is fitted with a 
brick flash wall, the top of which extends to 
the bottom row of tubes. At this plant a 
patented burner is used for spraying the oil. 
The burner is placed in the ash door open- 
ing and tipped so that the flame will im- 
pinge on the flash wall near the tube sheet. 

.At the Mount Hope pumping station the 
W. N. Best burner is used on each of the 
two locomotive-type Ijoilers. This plant is 
equipped in the same manner as at the 
Gatun pumping station. 

At the Tabernilla pumping station two old 
French marine-type boilers are using oil as 
fuel. The flash wall is plared in the flue 
about four feet from the fire door, the lower 
half of this flue being covered with brick so 
that the gases will not impinge on the sheets 
until combustion has taken place. 

At the Gorgona pumping station two ma- 
rine-type boilers have been equipped for 
burning oil, although only one is used at a 
lime. These boilers are equipped in practi- 
cally the same manner as those at the Tab- 
ernilla pumping station. 

At the Gorgona shops five horizontal re- 
turn tubular boilers have been equipped for 
burning oil and the sixth one is nearly com- 
pleted. Two of these boilers are equipped 
with a modification of the Warren burner 
and three with a modified Booth burner, 
each boiler using two burners. The burners 
are placed at an elevation midway between 
the ash and fire doors. The furnaces are 
equipped with hollow flash walls and two 
secondary floors so that all air required for 
combustion is first drawn into the heated 
flash wall and along the upper secondary 
floor, through which it passes through open- 
ings about one-half inch wide to the fur- 
nace, where ignition takes place. 

The Las Cascadas air compressor plant 13 
equipped in a manner similar to that of 
Gorgona, with the exception that the Booth 
type of burner is used under all of the 
boilers. 

Six boilers are burning oil at Empire 
shops and six more are being equipped. 
The method of installation is similar to that 
at Las Cascadas and Gorgona, with the ex- 
ception that all burners are of the W. N. 
Best type. 

The Rio Grande air compressor plant has 
three boilers equipped for burning oil and 
the remaining three will be finished about 
November 15. The equipment at this plant 
is identical with that of Las Cascadas. 

The Ancon pumping station has one ver- 
tical boiler burning oil at the present time, 
and two horizontal return tubular boilers 
are being equipped for that purpose. This 
plant has been experimenting with the 
Booth, Best, and Owens types of burners. 

At the La Boca electric light plant seven 
boilers are equipped for fuel oil, five of 
which are of the Manning type and two of 
the Sterling type. Each of these boilers is 
using the W. N. Best type of burner. The 
fire boxes of the vertical boilers are lined 
with one course of brick to within about one 
foot of the lower tube sheet, and a check- 
ered flash wall is placed at right angles to 
the burner about three-quarters of the diam- 



86 



THE CANAL RECORD 



eter of the boiler from the burner, the 
burner bein.^'plficedin the ash door opening 
and the flame directed ajrainst the flash 

W.ll]. 

At the I^a Boca ship yards four French 
boilers of the marine type are using fuel oil 
and are equipped with several types of 
burners made at the La Boca shops. In 
these boilers no flash wall is made use of, 
the flame being allowed to extend the whole 
length of the furnace. Most of the floating 
equipment at the Pacific entrance, including 
dredges, clapets, tugs, and launches, are 
equipped with oil burner and storage tanks 
and are using oil. 

The approximate amount of oil that will 
be used per month at the difl'erent plants on 
the Isthmus is as follows; 

Hanvh. 

Cristob.nl shops 650 

Cristob.il ice plant 3,900 

M^tuiit Hope pumpinir station 2S0 

Gntun pumping stalion 600 

Tabeniilla pumpitiK station 450 

Gorsona pumi>inK- station 600 

Gnr^om sliops .3.000 

l.as Ca.seadas air compre.ssor plant 1.800 

Rnipire pumping station 200 

Kmpire shops 7,000 

.Ancon punipincr station 1.101 

I,a noca shops and floating equipment. 3.200 

I.a noca electric light plant 1..S00 

Total 24.080 

The question of using oil as fuel in the 
locomotives at work on the Canal has been 
considered, but for the present it has not 
been thought wise to take up this experi- 
ment. The Panama Railroad Company has 
placed one order for tv.elve locomotives to 
be equipped with oil tanks and, oil burning 
apparatus. It is expected the first delivery 
will lie made in about a month. 

Coucet-t by the I. C. C. Band. 



GORGON.^. C. Z. 
Sunday. November 15, ISOi, at 6 p. m.: 
PRCGKAM. 

1 yi:\TchSa>iiiaico F/yn it Morse 

2 Selection — (ii^orgt: li'ashinff;t,^n, Jr Cohan 

f n Po'inlar March — Pi-rsian Lamb Raz. ■ ■ Wenrich 

3 < d Sch )ttische — IVUen a Bov Savs " IV ill 

< Vuiir' Allen 

4 WnMz— Jolly Fellows Vollstedt 

5 Clarinet Solo — Somiianrbitla Thornton 

JOHN GRAY 

6 Selection — Hits of I lie Diy Remick 

C a Intermezzo a la Kas— Pickles and Pep- 

l\ iters Sheperd 

' I) Inlprmzzo a la InAxnn— Ivankoe. . .Van Alstyne 

8 Overture — Four A zes of Man Tyachner 

9 Huniorescine on Tlie A/errj' lVid07i< IVallz.JidUstGdi 
Introducing this popular m^lod.v from the opera 

"The Merry Widow." burlesqued in the following 
manner: ]. A little German band: 2. A flute solo 
with organ effect: .S, An am:iteur trombonist, who is 
willing to show what he can do if oi^ly requested 
to: 4, A street piano: 5. A la ragtime as played on a 
banjo : and finally — the result produced by the pop- 
iilarity of this melody — a brainstorm. 

10 March — Conde Wettge 

Chas. E. Jennings. Musical Difeelor. 

A concert will be given at Empire. C. 7... Sun- 
day. November 29. 



In accordance with the advertisement of 
the General Manager of the Panama Rail- 
road Company, offering several of the com- 
pany's properties in Colon for lea.se, the 
old tenants of the properties have been given 
new leases. 



The first installment of electrical machin- 
erj- fortheGatuu handling plant hasarrived 
on the Isthmus. It is expected the plant 
will be in operation bj- July 1, 1909. 



"NO HELP WANTED." 

Little Chance for New Men in the Canal 
Zone. 

The primary reason why the sign "No 
Help Wanted" is displayed along the line 
of tlie Canal is that the work has passed its 
highest point, so far as the employment of 
men is concerned. The present tendency is 
not to employ more men, but to reduce the 
force, and this applies alike to clerical, arti- 
san, and labor classes. 

From this time forward the work in the 
Canal Zone will be confined largely to ac- 
tual Canal Ijuiiding, that is, to excavation 
and dam and lock construction. Building and 
municipal work, erecting houses, installing 
water and sewer systems, and road making, 
have reached the stage where most of the 
expenditure from this time forth will be for 
maintenance. On this account the forces 
formerly engaged on municipal engineering 
and building have been reduced, and in con- 
sequence the services of a number of clerks, 
engineers, carpenters, plumbers, and other 
artisans have been dispensed with. Wher- 
ever possible the men whose services are not 
needed in one division of the work are em- 
ployed on another, and this system of trans- 
ferring members of the present force also 
reduces the number of positions open to new- 
men. 

The bulk of the manufacturing heretofore 
done in the shops is no longer necessarj-, be- 
cause the heads of the various divisions 
of the work can now estimate, si.x months 
or more ahead of time, what spare parts will 
b; needed, and material can be purchased 
in the States at a considerable saving in 
cost. On this account the mechanics and 
helpers heretofore engaged on manufactur- 
ing in the shops are facing a reduction in 
force, and a number of them have already 
be;n given free passage back to New York. 
This reduction, like the others, is in the in- 
terest of economy. It has the effect of mak- 
ing it almost impossible for mechanics not 
already in the employ of the Commission to 
find work on the Isthmus. 
• The demand for clerks has also ceased, for 
the number of men in this class of the serv- 
ice is greater than the number of positions, 
due to the abolition of three divisfons, and 
the curtailment of work in the Mechanical 
Division. Therefore, the clerical force is 
being reduced, insteid of being increased. 

Tlie work of laying concrete in the locks 
at Gatun and on the Pacific slope cannot 
begin until the completion of certain con- 
tracts for the supply of the plant needed to 
hirndle the materi^il. These contracts will 
not be finished before next spring. This 
being the case there is no present object in 
pttshing the work in Culebra Cut faster than 
it is now going, since at the present rate, 
the excavation there will be finished as soon 
as the locks and dams. The construction 
force is, therefore, at iti- maximum until the 
laying of concrete begins, when there will be 
a demand for men skilled in that work. 

Finall}-, the "gold" employes on the Ca- 
nal work are no longer a shifting force. The 
men who are here want to stay, both because 
the}' are interested in their work and like 
the country, and because the wage scale is 
higher than in the States. Thirteen hun- 
dred "gold" employes, out of the total of 
4,3^8, have their families here, and are oc- 
cupying Commission quarters. They form 



a nucleus that not only is not anxious to 
leave, but is desirous of staying until the 
Canal is cotnpleted. 

The problem of unskilled labor, at one 
time vexing because it was so difficult to 
procure tiien, has become a problem of how 
to keep the laborers already under contract 
employed. Common laborers are no longer 
asked to come to the Isthmus. They come 
of their own volition and apply for work. 

A. comparative statement of the gold and 
silver forces at work on the last days of June, 
July, August, and September is appended. 
The "gold" force includes all American 
clerks, artisans, and construction men, while 
the "silver" force includes laborers and ne- 
gro artisans: 



Tune 30. 191S. 
July 31. 1908.. 
Aug. 31. 19ns. 
.Sept. 30. 1908. 



Gold. 



4.5.S7 
4.477 
4.396 
4, .328 



20,991 
21,049 
21,4S6 
21.129 



Total. 



25,578 
25.526 
25,882 
25.457 



Expenditures 
for salaries 
and wages 
for the month 



51,515,602 15 
$1,407,660.17 
$1,416,515.98 
SI ,499.21.3 26 



This statement shows a steady decrease in 
the "gold" force. With regard to the "sil- 
ver" force it does not .give an adequate idea 
of the total number of laborers on tlie rolls 
of the Isthmian Canal Commission, because 
the labor force is never all at work at one 
time, whereas practically all the "gold" 
force is constantly at work. The decrease 
in the "gold" force has probably been more 
marked since October 1 than in any of the 
three previous months, owing to the reduc- 
tion in the shops. Data for October has not 
yet been compiled. 

Rainfall, November 1 to 7, 1938, Inclusive 

(midnight to midnight.) 

Maximum 
Stations. 



one da>' 



Atlantic Division- 

Cristobal 

Brazos Brook _. . . , 

Gatun 

Bohio 

Central Division— 

Tabernilla 

San Pablo 

Bas Obispo 

Gamboa 

Empire 

Camacho 

Culebra 

Rio Grande 

Pacific Division — 

Pedro Miguel 

La Boca 

Ancon 

Atlantic Coast — 
Porto B;llo 

Utiper Chagres. 

El Vigia 

Alha,inela 



3.65 


6.90 


1.90 


5.H 


2..36 


5.69 


1.59 


2.49 


.50 


1.93 


.66 


2.77 


1.32 


2.79 


.7,8 


2.09 


.17 


.73 


1.67 


2.49 


.37 


.69 


.42 


.71 


.62 


163 


.95 


3.21 


1.00 


3.99 


1.16 


4.49 


1.J5 


3.43 



Stages of the Chagres. 

Maximum height of Chagres above low 
water for the week ending midnight, No- 
vember 7, 1908 : 





Stations. 






i 






^^ 


^ 


















■5 


1 


s 


6 








> 


< 


o 


n 


O 


o 


Height of low water 














above mean sea 














level, feet 


rw 


92 


46 











Maximum height ab 














low water, feet: 














Sunday. Nov. 1. ... 


2.2 


2.6 


5.4 


12.5 


7.0 


9.0 


Monday, Nov. 2 


l.S 


2.5 


5.1 


11.9 


6.3 


8.2 


Tue.sdav, Nov. 3. ... 


36 


3.5 


5.(1 


10.0 


6.0 


7.7 


Wedn'sday. Nov. 4 


4.5 


4.2 


7 2 


10.2 


5.5 


7.2 


Thursday. Nov. 5. . 


2.4 


3,0 


7.0 


11.7 


5.6 


7.2 


Friday, Nov. 6 


10.1 


7.6 


9.8 


9.0 


4.8 


6.2 


Saturday. Nov. 1 ... 


7.0 


6.4 


11.0 


14.3 


65 


8.4 


Maximum for week.. 


10.1 


7.6 


ll.U 


14.3 


7.0 


y.o 



THE CANAL RECORD 



87 



COMMrSSION CLUBHOUSES. 

Activities of the Young IVIeu*s Christian 
Association. 

Election day and iiiKht, together with the night 
preceding, nftorded much fun. excitement and recre- 
ation. TemiDorary telsg^raph offices had b^en in- 
stalled in clubhouses on election night and, by direct 
cable service, election bulletins were received almost 
as soon as returns were known at New York. These 
bulletins were exhibited on stereopticon screens. A 
prof^^ram of music, monologues, sketches, and gen- 
eral fun-making was carried out. The climax of in- 
terest and excitement was in the local municipal 
elections. Political rivalry was so strong and inter- 
est so keen that scarcely any Americans were at- 
tracted to Panama and Colon. notwithsUinding that 
election day was a holiday, because of occurring on 
Independence Diy of the Republic of Pauam:i. A 
tally register count showed an attendance of more 
th:in 5.013 within the clubhouses durinjf the day and 
night, besides there were several hundred persons 
wlio could not gain admission but who listened to 
campaign speeches delivered from the clubhouse 
steps. 

A tally-register count of attendance in the four 
Commission clubhouses from October 25 to Novem- 
ber 7 tboth inclusive) was as follows : 
OCTOBER 25-31, 





II 
[-■ 

2.371 
2.657 
2.036 
2,799 


§S 

<1 
339 
380 
294 
400 


High day. 


1.0W day. 


Culebm 

Empire 

Gorg:onn 

Cristobal.... 


648. Oct. 25 
512.0C..31 
529. Oct. 31 
502. Oct. 30 


232, Oct. 27 
300. Oct. 60 
191. Oct. 27 
280. Oct. 26 


Tot.nl 


9,3S3 


1,412 


1.728, Oct. 31 1 1,066. Oct. 27 



NOVEMBER 1-7. 





9J 
U 

II 
Jl 

3.342 
3,937 
2,743 
5.065 


H 


High day. 


I.ow day. 


Culebra 

Empire 

Gorgona. . .. 
Cristobal.... 


477 
562 
392 
724 


806. Nov. 2 
1.399, Nov. 3 

871. Nov. 3 
2,007. Nov. 3 


279. Nov. 6 
303, Nov. 6 
273. Nov. 4 
324, Nov. 6 


Total 


15.087 


2.155 


5.0,85. Nov. 3 1 1.192. Nov. 6 



The Ernest Gamble Concert Party, who made 
themselves .so popular by their entertiiinraents in the 
clubhou-ses in December of last year, will visit the 
Isthmus again and will be accompanied by Miss 
Edith Harris Scott, contralto and reader. Other 
members of the company are Ernest Gamble. -basso: 
Verno I.eone Page, violinist; and Sim Lambersou, 
pianist. The company will appear at Cristobal, .Sat- 
urday evening, November 14: Gorgona, the 15th: Cu- 
lebra, the 16th, and Empire, the 19th. 

The standing of the bowling league on November 
9. was as follows : 



ayed 


Won. 


Lost. 


Per cent 


63 


39 


24 


.617 


63 


39 


24 


.617 


57 


24 


33 


.421 


57 


IS 


39 


.315 



Second. 


Third 


877 


817 


785 


787 



Cristobal 

Empire 

Culebra , 

Gorgona , 

CRISTOBAL. 

The result of the local election, held at the club- 
house on November 3, was a complete victory for the 
Panama Railroad ticket, all their candidates being 
elected. 

The score of the games howled at Cristobal on Sat- 
urday evening, November 7. was as follows : 

First. 

Cristobal 696 

Empire S20 

GORGONA. 

Monday. November 2, the various political parties 
of Gorgona joined forces for the time being and 
pulled off a political rally that would have done jus- 
tice to the .States. After parading the streets they 
gathered at the clubhouse, and the vniious candi- 
dates were called upon for speeches. On Tuesday 
evening, November 3. a general election was held at 
the clubhouse. Dan Wright, Geo. Loughrey and 
Frank L,asker were elected aldermen, and William 
Witmer was chosen major. A smoker was a feature 
of the evening, while the returns were being re- 
ceived from the Slates by special wire. 

Friday evening. November 6. the Gorgona Y. M. 
C, A. Dramatic Club held its first rehearsal of a new 
drama, which will be given to the public early in De- 
cember. 

^_ Sunday afternoon, November 8, an infonnal 
"sing" was held at the clubhouse. A piano and 



two vocal solos were special features of the service. 
Sunday evening. November 15, at S.30 o'clock, the 
Gamble Concert Party will give a sacred concert at 
the clubhouse. 

CULEBRA. 

In the local election held at Culebra, November 2, 
Mr. E. M. Pullen was elected mayor for the ensuing 
yeai. receiving 166 votes out of 260 polled. Mr. C. A. 
Mcllvane was second with 8 t. 

As a result of a caucus of representative citizens 
from the four wards of Culebra. held at the Y. M. C. A. 
on the evening of November 6. in response to the 
proclamation of the mayor, published November 3, 
nominations were made for the following offi:ers of 
the municipal government; judge of the city court, 
district attorney, city clerk, sheriff of city court, city 
treaMirer. coroner, councllmeu. Further nominations 
for these offices will be received if accompaniecl 
by a petition signed by twenty-five voters. These 
petitions must be presented to Mr. W. H. Bnxley, 
city clerk, pro lem., before 6 p. m., Wednesday, No- 
vember 11. The election will be held November 13. 
from 7 to 9 p. m. 

On .Saturday. October 31, the boys' departments of 
the Cristobal and Culebra Y. M. C. A. held an all day 
meet at Cristobal. In the morning the 15-yard dash, 
running high ju'i p. a basketball game and relay race 
were held; and following these eventsan indoor bise- 
ball game was played. In the afternoon two bowling 
matches were rolled, one of duck pins and the other 
with regular pins. The following is a summary of 
the events; 

15-yard dash— First. Simms of Cristobal; second, At- 
kins of Culebra: third. Roe of Culebra. 

High jump— First Simms, Cristobal; second, A. Lin- 
dersmith, Cristobal; third, Morris, Cristobal. 
Relay race, won by Culebra 
Baseball game, won by Culebra IS to 16. 
Duck pins, won by Culebra. 
Regular pins, won by Culebra. 
Total points scored, Cristobal 3i; Culebra 52. 
The Culebra Y. M. C. A. pool and billiard team de- 
feated the Empire team, Saturday evening. November 
7, four games to one. Bi billiards Tragsdorf defeated 
Housel 100 to S6 Strong defeated Elgard 100 to 93. 
In pool Fleischman defeated McICeever lOCi to 69; 
Stevens defeated Mcllroy 100 to 72. Chappie of Em- 
pire defeated McRaven of Culebra 100 to 32. 

The Gorgona brisket-ball team was defeated at Cu- 
lebra by the score 29 to 19. Line up of Culebra— 
Rackle, captain; Cushing. Smith. Bath. King. Line 
up of Gorgona; Edbon. Christ, Swanson, captain, 
Hennen and McCcirmick. 

The score of the games bowled at Culebra on Sat- 
urday evening:, November?, was: 

First. Second. 

Culebra 803 822 

Gorgona 772 783 

EMPIRE. 

open house was observed November 3, election 
day, and 1,393 people visited the clubhouse. The re- 
sult of the election was as follows: For M.iyor of 
Empire— Gorham, 141; Davies. 47; Rcmrke. 32; Hum- 
mer, 79: Warrick. 10; Perry Brown. 10; Williams. 7: 
Porter 5. 

The Marine band furnished music which was 
appreciated by the large audience. Mrs. Gorh:im 
and Miss Hillerman gave a piano duet; Mr. Dohr- 
man and Mr. Moore, a vocal duet: Mr. Gray, a 
buck and wing dance; Mr. Jacobs, song and dance; 
Miss Clark, vocal selection. Refreshmei.ts were 
furnished by the ladies of Empire during the even- 
ing. Mrs. Johnson being chairman of the committee. 

The two-men bowling tournament has begun and 
there is much interest, as one man must depend upon 
the gojd work of the other. 

Arrangements are being made by the campaign 
committees for the inauguration which will he com- 
bined with a smoker given in the near future. 



Third. 
7,^l 
780 



Misdirected Letters. 

Division of Posts, Customs and Revenues, 

Ancon, C. Z.. November 10. 19uS. 
The following insufficiently addre.'^sed letters, origi- 
nating in the United States and its possessions, hnve 
been received in the office of the Director of Posts, 
and may be obtained on request of addressee: 
Anderson. Mrs. Rosita 
Blackman. Donald 
Brock. :\Irs. Nellie 
Brown, Mrs. Grace 
Campbell. J. F. 
Connors, Gene 
Gerdes, R 
GrifRn, .\nthouv 
Hall. Wm- H. 
Hansson. H. F. 
Henner, Otto 
Horner, Uriah 
Howard, G. Arthur 
Ives. F. W B. 12) 
Jackson. ^Irs. Florence 
Judge, Miss T. 



Keir.stead. H. W. 
Kellv. Pierce 
Kimball, H. B. 
McKniglit, Jim 
McNaught. Robert 
Naylor. Michael 
Price. Peter 
Rntzler. George F. 
Safier. Mrs. R. 
Saunders Miss I. 
Soupoflo.A. A Berges 
Textor. Mrs. H. N. 
Truells. Edwin 
von der I.eith, TJieodore 
Weiser. William 
Wise, Lieut, Wm. C. Jr. 



OCTOBER STEAM SHOVEL RECORDS. 

The steam shovels at work on the Canal 
excavated 1,953,502 cubic yards in October. 
Of this amount 216,961 cubic yards were 
taken out by the Atlantic Division, 1,598,981 
cubic yards by the Central Division, and 
137,560 cubic yards by the Pacific Division. 
The records made in the Central and Pacific 
Divisions follow : 

Best Records for thte Month. 

Central Division. 

TABERNIt-LA DISTRICT. 



Shovel 


Cubic Yards. 


No. of 


No. 


1 Earth. Rock. 


Total. 


days at 
work. 


253 .... 
123 .... 


! 20.460 23,071 
i 20.056 20,874 


43,331 
40,930 


27 
26 


GORGONA DISTRICT. 


25S .... 
236 .... 


14,144 18,749 
9.270 22,694 


32,893 
31,964 


26 
26 


BAS OBISPO DISTRICT. 


211 .... 

212 .... 


32.3S3 
29.431 


17.437 I 49,820 
12,613 1 42,044 


26 
27 


EMPIRE DISTRICT. 


252 .... 




48.584 
42.682 


48,854 
47,424 


27 
27 


205 .... 


4,742 


CULEBRA DISTRICT. 


230 .... 




5S,4S3 
50,493 


58.483 
50,493 




217 .... 




77 










PEDRO MIGUEL DISTRICT. 




209 .... 
i37 .... 


6,273 


23.';07 
13,371 


29,882 
13,371 


24 








OBISPO DIVERSION. 


126 


17,SJ9 




17,819 


25 










Pacific Division. 

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS. 



222 



.. Not cls'fi'd Notcls'fi'd 



24,410 



MIRAPLORES LOCKS. 



118 
153 



Not cls'fi'd Not cLsTi'd 



25 
22 



C.\RDENAS HILL. 



157 Not cls'fi'd Not clsTi'd 



Best Records for One Day. 
Centrai, Division. 



c 
tr. 


IvOCation. 


Date. 


Character ma- 
terial exca- 
vated. 


4i 

ii 


9^3 


Tabernilla 

Tabeniilla 


Oct 
Oct 
Oet 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 


22 
23 
1 
21 
23 
31 
211 
20 
26 
2 
S 
12 




3,1.0 
2.520 
2 440 


114 

'16 


Earth 

Rock and earth 
Rock and earth 
Earth . . . 


255 
212 
262 
2.^2 
206 
205 
217 
209 
237 




2,030 


Bas Obi-spo 

B;is Obispo 

Empire 


2,931 


Earth 

Earth 

Ro -k 


2.270 
2.5S0 
2,565 




Earth 

Rock and earth 
Rock and earth 
Rock 


2,650 


Culebra 


2,.M0 


Pedro Migriiel 

Pedro Miguel 


2.220 
1,580 


153 
259 

258 

137 

1 


Paci 


FIG 


DIV 


ISION. 




Miraflore.s I,ocks 
Mir.iflores Locks 
Pedro Miguel 

lyocks 

Cardenas Hill ... 


Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 
Oct. 


31 
6 

30 
7 


Not classified.. 
Not classified.. 

Rock. . . ; 

Earth | 


1.630 
1.710 

1,630 
1,145 



NOTH — Sliovels ill the oiie-hnndred clnss are 75-ton 
Bncyrus and Model 60 M irion with diopers of a 
capacity of 2V2 cubic yards. Shovels in the two- 
hundred class are 95-ton Bucyms and IVIodel 91 
Marion with dippers of a capacit\- of 5 cubic yards. 
Shovels in the fift>-class are 45 ton shovels with 
dippers of a capacit>- of l-^i. cubic yards. These 
shovels are under steam for eight hours per da\', but 
are not actually worked during^ this entire period, 
time being lost b\' the necessity of nio\'ing the 
shovel forward, blasting stone too big for tlie shovel 
to handle, keeping the shovel supplied with cars, etc. 



8S 



THE CANAL RECORD 



COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT. 



COMMISSARY CORRESPONDENCE. 

Patrons of tfie Commissary Deparhnent^ 
zohen dealing i^'ith the Cristobal office, will 
address their individual orders, deposits^ 
etc., to the Order Room, Commissary De- 
partment, Building Xo. 2, Cristobal. 

Complaints should be made in separate 
letters and addressed to the Subsistence Of- 
ficer^ Building No. 2, Cristobal. 

JOHN BURKE, 
Manager. 
A pproved : 
EUGENE T. li'lLSON. 

Subsistcnct' Ojfficer. 

The hours during which commissaries are 
open are as follows : 

Cristobal and Culebra, S a. m. to 12.30 
p. m.; 2 p. m. to 7 p. m. 

All other commissaries, 8 a. m. to 1 p. m.; 
3 p. m. to 7 p. ni. 



COMMISSARY PRICES 

For week bctriiiniiiy November 10: 
FRESH MKATS. 

Mutton — StcwiiiK per lb 6 

Shoulder and neck (not under 

6 pounds) per lb 7 

Kntirt: forecinarter (not under 

10 pounds) per lb S 

l,et' (S to 10 pounds) per lb 16 

Short-cut chops per lb 2J 

L*mTj— Stewintr per lb 6 

Entire forequ.-irter per lb S 

Leg (^ to s pounds) per lb 27 

Chops per lb 29 

Veal— Stewing per lb 10 

Entire forequarter (15 to 20 lbs). ...per lb 11 

Loin for roasting per lb 21 

Chops per lb 22 

Cutlets per lb 26 

Pork— Cuts - per lb 20 

Beef— Suet perlb ( 

Soup ner lb » 

Stew per lb IJ 

Conied perlb.. 12. 11, 16 

Pot roast (from sirloin butt) per lb 17 

Rib-roast, second cut mot under 3 

pounds) per lb 19 

Rib-roast, short cut (not under 3''2 

pounds) per lb 23 

Sirloin roast .....perlh 29 

Kump roast per lb 29 

rorterhouse roast per lb 29 

Steak, round perlb lii 

Rib per lb 24 

Sirloin per lb 29 

Porterhouse per lb 29 

Rump per lb 29 

Teuderloin perlb 30 

MISCELLANKOUS, 

Livers— Calf each 65 

Beef perlb 11'? 

Sausage— Pork perlb 18 

Leberwurst per lb 17 

Frankfurter oer lb 17 

Bolog^na per lb 17 

Sweet bread — Veal each 1.20 

Beef perlb 30 

Piflfs' tongues, pickled perlb 15 

Pigs' feet perlb 14 

Oysters. K-gallou kegs each SO 

Kggs, fresh dozen -^0 

rOULTRV AND GAME. 

Chickens— Dressed (milk-fed) each 1.00 

Capons each 2.40 

Broilers each 60 

Fowls, medium and large each, SOc. and 1.00 

Turkeys perlb 30 

Squabs each 45 

Suckling pigs (whole! each 3.50 

Suckling pigs (one-half) each 1.75 

CURED AND PICKLED MEATS. 

Bacon— Strips per lb II 

English, breakfast sliced per lb §26 

Ham — Sugar-cured, sliced per lb §25 

One-half, for boiling per lb §21 

Ferris per lb 20 

Beef. salt, family per lb 16 

Salt pork perlb 13 



DAIRY PRODUCTS. 

Butter— Prints, prime quality perlb 40 

Cheese— Neufchatel each 6 

Roquefort perlb 45 

Swiss per lb 31 

Edam-.. each 1.05 

Camenibert per lb 2^ 

McUiren's jur 15 

Pinxter's tin 22 

French cheese in tins~Camembert, Roque- 
fort. Brie. Neufchatel tin 20 

Milk. Briarcliff botUe 25 

VEGETABLES AND FRUITS. 

Lettuce per lb 14 

White potatoes ..perlb 3M; 

Sweet potatoes perlb 2'-ir 

Cabbage per lb 4 

Onions... per lb 3V2 

Cucumbers .per lb IS 

Yams perlb 3^< 

Parsnips perlb 2'< 

Beets per lb 3 

Peppers perlb 5 

Grapes (3-lb baskets) basket 30 

Lemous dozen 24 

Oranges dozen 18 

Apples perlb 5 

Grapefruit each 3 

Cranberries ..perlb 12 

§ Sold only from cold-storage aiul not from Com- 
missaries. 

NEW ARTICLES. 

Price. 

Watches, "Ingersoll" ladies' nickel each $1.70 

Watches. "Ingersoll" ladies' oxidized each 1.80 

P.iste, library. Carter's, 2-oz bottle 5 

Razors. "Clauss Safety" each 3.00 



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS. 



LEGAL NOTICES. 



In ye Estate of Anatole Laurence. Deceased.— To 
any and all persons having any claim or claims 
against the estate of ,\natole Laurence, deceased, 
who died at Enipire, Canal Zone, on the 18th day of 
September, 1908: 

You are hereby notified topresent yourclaims, duly 
verified, to Felix I,aurence. administrator of said es- 
tate, or to the undersigned, on or before the 1st day 
of June, 1909, or .vour claims will be forever barred 
.iccording to law. 

Witness my hand, this 6th day of November. A. D. 
1908. 

E. M. GOOLSBY. 
Clerk of the Circuit Court , Second Judicial Circuif. 
Canal Zone, at Empire. 



Empire. C. Z.. October 22. 190S. 
To any and all persons who may have any claim 
or claims against the estate of Philip F. Kramer, de- 
ceased, who met his death at the town of Paraiso, 
Canal Zone, on December 17, 1907 : You will present 
the same ou or before the 1st day of December, 1908, 
to Theodore C. Hinckley, administrator of the estate 
of P. F. Kramer. Panama. Panama, or E- M- Goolsby. 
Clerk of the Circuit Court. Empire. Canal Zone, 
properly verified, or the same will be forever barred 
according to law. 

Theo. C. Hinckley. 
Adniinistyator 



Empire. C. Z.. November 2. 1908, 
[ Administration. 



Estate of 
Michael Doyle J ' 

All relatives of the late Michael Doyle, an Ameri- 
can, who died intestate at Ancon Hospital on the 
20th of July, 1908, are hereby requested to communi- 
cate with the Administrator of the estate. Also all 
persons owing the said estate will likewise communi- 
cate witli the .Administrator in order that a settle- 
ment may be effected : and all creditors of the estate 
must tile their claims, properly verified, with the Ad- 
ministrator within si.x montiiS, or the same will be 
barred. 

F. H. SHEIBLEY. 
Administrator. 

Tug Service Porto Bello and Nombre de 
Dios. 

Effective. August 6. 190S: The following is the 
schedule for tug service between Cristobal, Porto 
Bello and Nombre de Dios: 

Sunday: Leave Cristobal 6.3C p. m. for Porto Bello 
only; returning same day. 

Monday: Leave Cristobal after Train 2 for Porto 
Bello and Nombre de Dios; returning same day. 

Tuesday: Leave Cristobal after Train 2 without 
tow. for Porto Bello only: returning, leave Porto 
Bello 2.15 p. m., without tow. 

Wednesday: Leave Cristobal after Train 2 for 
Porto Bello and Nombre de Dios: returning same 
diiy. 

Friday; Leave Cristobal after Train 2 for Porto 
Bello and Nombre de Dios; returning same day. 

SaturdayT Leave Cristobal after Train 2 for Porto 
Bello only; returning, leave Porto Bello 5.30 p. m 



The following is a list of the sailings of the Pan- 
ama Railroad Steamship Company, of the RoyaJ 
.Mail Steam Packet Company, of the Hamburg- 
American Line, and of the United Fruit Company's 
Line, the Panama Railroad Company's dates being 
subject to change: 

PROM NEW YORK TO COLON. 

Allianca P. R. R.Saturday Nov. 7 

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm...H.-A Saturday Nov. 7 

Colon P. R. R.Thursday .. ..Nov. 12 

Magdalena R.-M Saturday Nov, 14 

Panama P. R. R.Tuesday Nov. 17 

Prinz Joachi.n H.-A Saturday Nov. 21 

Finance P. R. R.Monday Nov. 23 

Orinoco R.-M Saturday Nov. 28 

Advance P. R. R.Saturday Nov. 28 

Allianca P. R. R.Thursday Dec. 3 

Prluz Aug. Wilhelm...H.-A Saturday Dec. 5 

Colon P. R. R.Tuesday Dec. 8 

Atrato R.-M Saturday Dec. 12 

Panama P. R. R.Monday Dec. 14 

Finance P. R.R.Saturday Dec. 19 

Prinz Joachim H.-A .Saturday Dec. 19 

Advance P. R. R.Thursday Dec. 24 

Trent R.-M Saturday Dec. 26 

Allianca .-..P. R. R.Tuesday Dec. 29 

All the steamers of the Hamburg-American and 
Royal Mail lines call at Kingston enroute to Colon. 

FROM COLON T* NEW YORK. 

Finance P. R. R.Monday Nov. 9 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Tuesday Nov. 10 

Advance P. R. R.Sunday Nov. 15 

Orinoco R.-M Tuesday Nov. 17 

Allianca P. R. R.Friday Nov. 20 

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm...H.-A Tuesday Nov. 24 

Colon P. R. R.Wednesday ..Nov. 25 

Panama P. R. R.Monday Nov. 30 

Atrato R.-M Tuesday Dec. 1 

Finance P. R. R.Sunday Dec. 6 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Tuesday Dec. 8 

Advance P. R. R.Friday Dec. 11 

Trent R.-M Tuesday Dec. 15 

Allianca P. R. R.Wednesday ..Dec. 16 

Colon P. R. R.Monday Dec. 21 

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm...H.-A Tuesday Dec. 22 

Panama P. R. R.Sunday Dec. 27 

Tagus R.-M Tuesday Dec. 29 

Finance P. R. R.Friday Jati. 1 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Tuesday Jan. 5 

.A.dvance P. R. K.Wednesday ..Jan. 6 

Allianca P. R. R.Monday Jan. 11 

FROM NEW ORLEANS TO COLON. 

Cartago U.F.C.. Saturday Nov. 14 

Parismina U.F.C.vSaturday Nov. 21 

Heredia U.F.C.. Saturday Nov. 28 

FROM COLON TO NEW ORLE.\NS. 

Heredia U.F.C.Tuesday Nov. 17 

Cartago U.F.C.Tuesday Nov. 24 

Parismina U.F.C.Tuesday . . . .Dec. 1 

FROM COLON TO BARBADOS. CALLING AT TRINIDAD. 

Magdalena R.-M Tuesday Nov. 24 

Orinoco R.-M Tuesday Dec. 8 

Atrato R.-M Tuesday Dec. 22 

Trent R.-M Tuesday . . . .Jan. 5 

FROM COLON TO NEW ORLEANS VIA KINGSTON. 

Jamaican Ley land Liue. .about.. Nov, 22 

Antillian Levland Line, .about. .Nov. 30 

The Panama railroad steamships sail at 3 p. m 
from dock at Cristobal direct to New York. 

The Prinz steamers of the Hamburg-American line 
sail from Colon at 1 p. in. via Kingston. Jamaica, 
for New York. 

All Royal Mailsteamers mentionedabove leave early 
in the morning from Colon via Kingston. Jamaica, 
for New York. .All mail and passengers should be 
on board early on day of sailing. 

The steamers of the United Fruit Company's line 
sail from New Orleans at 10 a. m. for Colon, calling 
at Puerto Barrios, and from Colon at 1.30 p. m.. via 
Port Linion and Puerto Barrios, for New Orleans. 

Sailings of the French line (Cie. G6ni^rale Trans- 
atlantique) for Venezuelan ports. Martinique and 
Guadeloupe on the 3d and 2^X\\ of ench month. 



The following steamers have recently arrived at La 
Boca: November 1, Peru, from San Francisco, and 
Chile, from Valparaiso: November 6, Aysen, from 
Valparaiso. Departures were : October 30, Quito, for 
Buenaventura; November 3. Loa, for Valparaiso ; 
November 4, City of Para, for San Francisco. 



A deep water channel is being dredged from the 
Panama railroad docksat La Boca to the marine shops, 
which are located on the Rio Grande. When it is 
completed the vessels at the Pacific entrance can nm 
up to the shops at any stage of the water. 



CANAL 




RECORD 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1908. No. 12. 



Volume II. 



The Canal Record 



Published weekly under the authority and supervision of the 
ISTHMIAN CANAL COMMISSION 



"Tfie Canal Record"" is issited Jree oj ckarse, one 
copy each, to ail etnployes of the Commission and Pan- 
ama Railroad Company whose names are on the" gold'" 
roll. Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained 
from the news stands of the Panama Raihoad Com- 
pany for five cents each. 



Address all Communications 

THE CANAL RECORD 

AncoHf Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama. 

No communication , either Jor publication or request- 
ing injormation, will receive attention unless signed 
with the full name and address of the writer. 

NOTES OF PROGRESS. 

Chairman's Monthly Report. 

The report of the Acting Chairman of the 
Isthmian Canal Commission for October is 
published in other columns of this issue of 
The Canal Record. The work of re- 
organization was continued, and, effective 
October 12, the Division of Meteorology and 
River Hydraulics was abolished, the duties 
pertaining to that division being assigned to 
the Assistant Engineer in the office of the 
Chairman and Chief Engineer. The grand 
total of excavation for the month was 3,286, - 
173 cubic j-ards. This includes 57,638 cubic 
yards of dredging in connection with the 
dock for the handling plant at Gatun and is 
outside of the excavation for actual Canal 
construction. 

In the Atlantic Division 119,272 cubic 
yards of material were dumped on the 
south toe of Gatun dam, 35.989 cubic _\-ards 
of this material being rock from Bas Obispo, 
and the remainder from the lock site, the 
spillway, and from Mindi. On the north toe 
of the dam 39,290 cubic yards of material 
from the spillway and Mindi were dumped. 
Dredging for sand was commenced at Nom- 
bre de Dios on October 27. 

The excavation in the Central Division, 
which includes Culebra Cut, amounted to 
1,598,981 cubic yards, of which 1,551,409 
cubic yards were from the Canal prism. The 
average number of steam shovels at work in 
this division was 49.55 against 39.85 in Oc- 
tober of last 3-ear. The output per shovel 
per day was 1,185 cubic yards against 800 
cubic yards a year ago, an increase of 48 per 
cent. 

The average number of laborers employed 
daily was 13,396; 392.323 tons of explosives 
■were used, and 399,984.7 feet of rock drill- 
ing was accomplished. 

The surplus of labor on the Isthmus con- 
tinued. No laborers were imported during 



the month, and none are being recruited at 
this time. The agent of the Commission for 
the recruiting of European laborers, with 
headquarters at Paris, has been withdrawn 
and arrangements have been made with the 
agents of the .several steamship lines which 
have transported laborers to the Isthmus to 
act as recruiting agents for the Commission, 
in the event it should become necessary to 
secure additional Europeans. One of the 
recruiting agents in the West Indies has also 
been withdrawn. 

During the month 181,331 meals were 
served at the various hotels. There has been 
a constant diminution in the meals served 
both in the Spanish messes and in the colored 
laborers' kitchens. The attendance at the 
messes has fallen from about 4,000 per day 
on August 1, to 3,400 per day on November 
1, and the attendance at the kitchens has 
fallen from 6,000 a day on July 1, to 4,000 a 
day on November 1. It is estimated that 
there are about 7,000 laborers that do not 
eat at the kitchens or live in Commission 
quarters. 

On the relocation of the Panama Railroad 
3,831 linear feet of permanent track were 
laid, making a total of 47,407 feet. The 
force of laborers on this work during the 
month averaged 908. 

The Division of Public Works of the 
Department of Civil Administration, report- 
ed that during the month 27,733,000 gal- 
lons of water were used in the city of Pana- 
ma, and 22,063,125 .gallons in the city of 
Colon. Health conditions continued to be 
satisfactory during October. 

Two Hundred Dump Cars. 

\ contract has been let to the Western 
Wheeled Scraper Company for 200 steel 
dump cars of 12 yards capacity. The first 
consignment will be delivered at Cristobal 
about January 1, and the contractor has 
agreed to finish the deliveries in March. 
Eight different firms submitted bids varying 
from $900, for a car lighter than that called 
for in the specifications, to .'51,535. The con- 
tract was awarded at the rate of S948 for 
each car, a total of .■?189,600. 

The car contracted for is of the gravity 
type, similar to the 300 Western dump cars 
and the 500 Oliver dump cars now in use on 
the Isthmus. Some of the bidders, includ- 
ing the successful one, sent engineers to the 
Isthmus to study the conditions peculiar to 
the work here and, as a result of their inves- 
tigations and of suggestions made by the 
Commission, the new cars will be superior 
to those already in use, although the latter 
have been satisfactory. One of the chief 
difficulties in the dump cars in use is the 
failure of the side door, and in the cars now 
being built special attention is paid to the 
design of the door in order to obviate the 
difficulties at present experienced. The draft 
sills of the new cars have also been made 



considerably heavier than those in the pres- 
ent cars. The improvements are simplv 
those suggested by two and one-half years' 
experience with this type of cars on various 
parts of the work. The center sills and 
latch rigging have also been improved. 

The new cars will be 21 feet over the strik- 
ing plates, with inside dimensions 19 feet 
by 9 feet bv 22V'2 inches. Their weight un- 
loaded will be about 29,000 pounds. The 
clearance between the door and the floor 
when the car has been dumped will be 4 feet 
8 inches. The cars will be delivered knocked 
down and will be erected on the Isthmus. 



Additional Cold Storage Unit. 

Authorit)- has been given for an additional 
unit at the cold storage plant at Cristobal, 
and specifications have been sent to the 
Purchasing Officer at New York for a 150- 
ton ammonia compressor and engine to be 
shipped to the Isthmus as soon as practi- 
cable. When the new unit is installed it 
will give a total capacity of 375 tons of re- 
frigeration for the compressor plant. 

One of the cooling rooms in the cold stor- 
age plant that heretofore has been kept at a 
temperature of 25 degrees Fahrenheit has 
been turned into a freezing room and will 
be kept at a temperature of 10 degrees Fah- 
renheit, which will keep meat in good con- 
dition for six months. 



Another Prench Dredge. 

Dredge No. 21, an old French ladder 
dredge, was hauled on the shipways at the 
La Boca marine shops on Thursday, Novem- 
ber 10, to be rehabilitated. This vessel was 
erected at the La Boca shops durin.g the 
French regime, but never had any of her 
machinery installed, and is now back on 
the same ways from which she was launched 
about twenty years a.go. 

From the water line to the top of her 
tower the dredge is in good condition, 
and after a new bottom is put on she will be 
practically new. .\11 the machinery to be put 
in is old French stock fovmd on the Isthmus, 
and it is intended to install oil-burning ap- 
paratus under the boilers. 

This is the fourth dredge of this tj-pe to 
be rebuilt at La Boca, and it is expected that 
the rebuilding will cost about #40,000. while 
a new dredge of equal capacity would cost 
»125,000. 



October Money Order Business. 

The report of the Chief of the Division of 
Posts, Customs, and Revenues for the month 
of October shows that 14,472 money orders, 
amounting to 5441,783.30, were issued, an 
increase of 511.792.83 over the amount re 
ported for September. Of the i>441, 783.30 
in October, $321,095.19 was in orders drawn 
payable in the United States and elsewhere, 
and ,?120,688.11 in orders drawn pavable in 
the Canal Zone. The fees collected amounted 



90 



THE CANAL RECORD 



NOTES OF PROGRESS. 

{Contintted). 

to ,'^1,815.37, and the amount paid and re- 
paid was .>126.309.98. 

Thelargestniiiuber of orders, 2,562, was is- 
sued at Cristobal, and amounted to 159,405.41, 
an average of $27, 09 per order. Empire wa.s 
second in the number of orders issued, 
1,832, but was third in amount, ,^55, 249.34, 
making an average per order of ,'<30.16; Gor- 
goiia was third in the number of orders is- 
sued, 1,543, but was second in amount with 
§58,956.54, an average per order of ,'ii38.21, 
the highest average for any post ofHce dur- 
ing the month. Ancon was fourth with the 
number of orders issued, 1,442, and sixth in 
amount, ^3,971.87, an averageof .$23.56, the 
lowest average amount per order shown for 
the month. Culebra was fifth in orders 
issued, 1,270, but was fourth in amount, 
i537,131,14, an averageof «;29.24. Pedro Mi- 
guel was fifth in amount, having sold 969 
orders, amounting to .535,026.73, an average 
of ,f;36.15, the second highest average shown. 
The average of all the orders issued was 

S30.53. 

New Gridiron Rt La Boca. 

A new gridiron is under construction at 
the La Boca marine shops. It is 300 feet 
long, 50 feet wide, and when completed will 
accommodate a vessel the size of the suction 
dredge Culebra. 

The foundations of the structure will be 
44 concrete piers, placed 7 feet apart and ex- 
tending the full width of the gridiron. The 
piers will rest on solid rock and a layer of 
mud and silt, from two to ten feet deep, is 
being removed from the site. As the 
variation in the tide on the Pacific side of 
the Isthmus is about 20 feet, the gridiron is 
so situated that a vessel, placed on it at high 
tide, will be entirely above water at low tide 
so that work can be done on the hull be- 
tween tides. It is expected that the work 
will be finished in about three months. 

Commission Action. 

At a meeting of the Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission on November 7, 1908, the following 
action was taken: 

There being no provision in the General 
Conditions of Employment, adopted by the 
Commission at its 129th meeting, for the 
payment to the estate of an employe dying 
while on leave of absence the amount due 
for the period from the effective date of the 
employe's leave to thedateof his death, and 
it being deemed desirable to provide for fu- 
ture cases of this character, it was 

Resolved. That if au employe who has entered up- 
on his leave of absence, with pay, dies while on such 
leave, his estate shall be paid the amount due him 
for the period from the effective date of his leave to 
thedateof his death, both inclusive: Piovided. that 
in case of the death of an employe before return from 
leave of absence and after expiration of the same, 
payment of salary accrued for the leave period may 
be made, with the approval of the Chairman. 

Additional Fire Alarm Boxes. 

Additional boxes are being added to the 
fire alarm systems of several towns in the 
Zone. Fire boxes have recently been added 
to the Ancon system, making a total of 15 in 
that system. The new bo.xes have been lo- 
cated at the following points: Near house 
No. 137, Ancon; near hoase No. 22, East La 
Boca; between the La Boca commissar}' and 
the electric light plant; at the La Boca ma- 
rine shops, and on the wharf at La Boca. 



The latter box is connected with five auxil- 
iary boxes located at convenient points on 
the wharf. 

The Gorgona system has had two aildi- 
tional boxes put in, one near house No. 88 
and one near house No. 161. This addition 
makes a total of eight boxes at Gorgona. 

Four boxes will be added to the Cristobal 
sj'stem which will bring the total up to 14 
fire alarm boxes. The new boxes will be 
placed between the bakery and the paint 
shop; at the Folks River labor camp; at the 
general offices of the Panama Railroad Com- 
pany, and on the beach near the residence 
of Mr. R. Budd. 

One additional box will shortly be put in 
at Empire, and will be located near the row- 
of type 14 houses west of the Disbursing 
Office. This addition will make a total of 
11 fire alarm boxes in the Empire system. 



the property, the estate shall, after proper 

petition, notice, and hearing, escheat to the 
Canal Zone, and shall be administered upon 
by the Collector of Revenues, the proceeds 
to be used for the benefit of Zone schools. 

The Head of the Department of Civil Ad- 
ministration lias, at the suggestion of the 
Auditor of the Zone, taken the matter up, 
and all personal effects in the hands of 
Hospital Superintendents, the Chief of Po- 
lice, or other persons, which it has been 
impossible to dispose of by any of the ordin- 
ary methods of administration, will be dis- 
posed of by the Collector of Revenues, under 
the law referred to, for the benefit of the 
Zone schools. 



Administration of Hstates. 

The estates of foreigners who die in the 
Canal Zone are administered by the consul 
of the country of which they were citizens 
or subjects. The estates of .Vmerican em- 
ployes of the Isthmiati Canal Commission 
or of the Panama Railroad Company who 
die in the Zone, when such estates do not 
exceed *500 in value, are administered b}- 
the Collector of Revenues of the Canal 
Zone. The laws of the Canal Zone provide 
for the judicial appointment of administra- 
tors, and that tnethod of administration is 
generally resorted to in cases which do not 
come within the jurisdiction of foreign con- 
suls or of the Collector of Revenues. But 
cases frequentlj- arise which cannot be han- 
dled by consuls or by the Collector of Reve- 
nues, in which the property is of too small 
value to justify judicial administration, or 
there are no heirs or other persons to com- 
mence administration proceedings. 

The Code of Civil Procedure of the Canal 
Zone provides that when a person dies in- 
testate, owning property in the Zone, and 
leaving no heir or person legally entitled to 



Accident to Pay Car. 

Isthmian Canal Commission pay car. No. 1, 
was wrecked at the Cut-off near the Gor- 
gona shops on Saturday night, October 14, 
on its return trip to Empire after complet- 
ing the monthly payment of employes. The 
ash-pan on En.gine No. 57 dropped and 
threw the tender off the track. The caboose, 
immediately behind the engine, was thrown 
over the embankment and the pay car was 
tipped over on its side across the tracks, 
blocking both the north and southbound 
tracks. While the pay car was badly dam- 
aged no one was hurt and no money was 
lost. The accident occurred about 6.30 p. m. 
and by 10 o'clock the wreck was cleared. 



Lfidgerwood Unloaders at La Boca. 

The three Lidgerwood unloaders of the 
Central Division working on the La Boca 
dumps during the month of October unloaded 
709 trains, composed of a total of 11,929 
cars. Of this number, engine No. 226 un- 
loaded ^59 trains composed of 4,366 cars; 
engine No 265 unloaded 238 trains with 
3,994 cars and engine No. 264 unloaded 212 
trains with 3,569 cars. As all the cars were 
20-yard cars, the material unloaded repre- 
sents about 238,580 cubic yards. 



LABOR FORCE FOR OCTOBER. 



The report of the Chief Quartermaster for 
the month of October, shows that a total of 
24,935 persons were actually employed on 
Canal work on October 31. Of this number 
4,183 were "gold" employes, and 20,752 
were ' 'silver. ' ' The additions to the ' 'gold' ' 
force during the month were 262, and the 
separations 402, making a reduction of 140. 
Of the additions to the "gold" roll, 82 
people were employed in the United .Slates, 
160 employed or re-employed on the Isth- 
mus, and 20 were transferred from the Pan- 
ama Railroad Company. Of the 402 sepa- 
rations, 90 people voluntarily left the service, 
244 were discharged, 53 resigned, 5 died, 3 
were changed to a "silver" basis, and 5 



were transferred to the Panama Railroad 
Company. The surplus Of labor on the 
Isthmus continues and no laborers were im- 
ported during the month. 

A statement of the occupants of Isthmian 
Canal Commission quarters during October, 
1908, shows that among "gold" employes 
and their families, there were 4,706 men, 
1,402 women, and 1,279 children occupying 
quarters. Amoiig the European laborers, 
there were 5,337 men, 338 women, and 383 
children occupying quarters, and of the 
West Indians there were 6,569 men, 1,032 
women, and 1,077 children in quarters. .A 
statement of the force actually at work on 
October 31, 1908, is as follov«rs: 





S 

s 

o 

3,036 
237 
392 

70 
314 

28 
106 




Silver Men. 


Total 
Silver. 


Total 


Department. 


Mou- 
thly. 


Arti 

32c. & 
over. 


saus. 
26c. 


European 
I,aborers. 


West Iiid'n 
Laborers. 


Gold 
and 




40c. 


32c. 


26c. 


20c. 


Meu. 




1,906 


4,245 


991 



4,427 

362 

4 


291 
35 


1,225 

112 

6 


2.953 
S21 
230 


16,039 

2,744 

1,001 

758 

195 

9 

6 


19.075 




1.071 

679 

757 

171 

9 

6 


343 

82 

1 

24 


2,981 


Department of Sanitation 

Subsistence Department 

Department of Civil Administration 


1.393 

82S 












509 












37 




1 










112 




















Totals... 


4.183 


4,599 


+.695 


991 


4.793 


327 


1.343 


4,004 


20.752 


24,935 



Panama railroad force, 5,078: Panama railroad coiiimissary force, 688. 



the;canal record 



91 



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE. 

Women's Clubs and Other Features. 

The Gorgona Woman's Club has the ar- 
• rangements for the Christmas celebration 
well in hand. The Young Men's Christian 
Association, the Sunday school, and the 
teachers of the public school have been asked 
to cooperate with the club, and the combined 
organizations are planning to make the occa- 
sion a memorable one. The meetings of 
the philanthropy department are held at the 
home of the chairman for the purpose of 
making clothing for the Panaman newsboys. 
Donations of clothing have been received, 
and these will be put in order and distribu- 
ted within a short time. The club has do- 
nated a sum of money to the leper colony at 
Palo Seco for the purchase of extra comforts 
for the inmates. The literary department is 
arranging for the study of Spanish and the 
history of Panama. The next meeting of 
the club will be in charge of the music de- 
partment, Mrs. Beetham, chairman. 

The Gorgona Chorus Club will give its. 
Old Folks' Concert at the Commission club- 
house on Frida\' evening, November 20. 

The newly instituted Rebekah lodge of 
Gorgona meets on the first and third Satur- 
day of each month in Fraternity hall. A 
drill team has been formed, and practice bj- 
the team forms a part of each meeting. A 
number of applications for admission have 
been received, and the members are enthu- 
siastic about the work. 

A reception in honor of the newly ap- 
pointed secretar}- of the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association, Mr. Guy P. Mitchell, has 
been arranged for Monday evening, Novem- 
ber 23. A musical program will be given. 
The Woman's Club is cooperating w-ith the 
Association in preparing the entertainment. 
Mr. Mitchell, who comes from Auburn, N. 
Y., arrived on the Isthmus on the A ilia nca, 
November 13. 

The young girls of Gorgona meet at the 
Conmiission clubhouse on Thursday after- 
noon for instructions in bowling. 

The Gatun Woman's Club held a meeting 
on Frida)', November 15, at the home of the 
president, Mrs. C. D. Corp, for the election 
of officers, with the following result: Presi- 
dent, Mrs. E. L. Bandy; vice-president, 
Mrs. O. Bromwell; secretary, Mrs. W. C. 
Story; treasurer, Mrs. h. A. Clark. These 
officers were elected for the term of three 
months, as there has been great difficult)- in 
finding members who are willing to serve for 
a longer period, and it was decided to amend 
the by-laws of the club in order to meet ex- 
isting conditions. .\ revision committee will 
also be appointed at the next meeting to draw 
up and present the required amendments. 
Chairmen of the different departments will 
be appointed at that time. Mrs. W. C. Stor}- 
was appointed to represent the club at the 
meeting of the Sunday school committee, 
for the arrangement of the Christmas cele- 
bration. The club has a sewing class for 
young girls, which meets at the home of 
Mrs. Bandy on Saturday afternoon. There 
are at present ten members, and they are 
interested in their work. The domestic or 
philanthropy committee is engaged in some 
special sewing for charity. The hour of 
meeting of this committee has been changed 
from 2,30 to 3 p. m., and it is agreed to 
meet every Friday- instead of semi-mrnthlj- 
as heretofore. The next meeting will be 



held at the home of Mrs. W. C. Story, No- 
vember 20. 

A concert in aid of the organ expense fund 
of Christ Church, Colon, was given in the 
parish .schoolroom on Tuesday- evening, No- 
vember 10, the program being rendered b}' 
Mrs. E. Ivewis Baker, Mrs. Frank Ullrich, 
and the Messrs. Sales, Delgard, Doty and 
Cooper. 

".Association Night" at the National Thea- 
ter, Panama, Tuesday, November 10, was 
such a success that arrangements for a sec- 
ond similar night are under consideration. 
Nearly 400 Zone residents attended the per- 
formance. 

Nearly 200 persons participated in the 
dance and social by the Culebra Roman 
Catholic Club at the clubhouse on Thursday, 
November 12, and it is estimated that the sum 
of over ,*i300 was raised toward the building 
fund of the Church of the Redeemer. Boxes 
filled with refreshments were auctioned off, 
some selling for .'sl4. An entrance fee was 
charged for the dancers, who took posses- 
sion of the floor later in the evening. A 
special train was run from L,as Cascadas, and 
there were present a number of guests from 
the Line. 

The Las Cascadas Woman's Club met at 
the residence of Mrs. T. J. Grimmisen on 
Thursday afternoon. A committee of three 
was appointed to make arrangements for the 
Christmas celebration, which will be held in 
the new clubhouse. 

The Empire Woman's Club met for the 
election of officers on .Saturday, November 7. 
Mrs. E. H. Ash was elected president, Mrs. 
H. C. Ball, vice president, Mrs. P. Bell, secre- 
tary and Mrs. A. S. Zinn, treasurer. At a sec- 
ond meeting on Tuesday afternoon, Novem- 
ber 17, the work for the coming season was 
planned and heads of departments ap- 
pointed. 

There was an unusually large attendance 
at the meeting of the Woman's Guild at St. 
Luke's Church, Ancon, at the Hotel Tivoli 
on Monda)- afternoon, November 16. The 
Yen. .-Archdeacon Purcell Hendricks, for- 
merly Archdeacon of Panama and the adja- 
cent countries, was the guest of the Guild 
and gave an address on the work of w-omen 
in the church. The Guild will hold its sale 
of cakes at the residence of the chaplain on 
Saturday afternoon, November 21, from 4 
to 9 o'clock. The proceeds of this sale will 
•■be devoted to the expenses of the Guild and 
the purchase of necessary fittings and fur- 
nishings for the new- chapel which will be 
opened on Christmas Day. Arrangements 
for a suitable celebration of Thanksgiving 
are being made. 

Class in Shorthand. 

Mr. William F. Benn3-hoff has received 
permission from the Chairman of the Com- 
mission to give instruction in short hand 
and will organize a class for that purpose in 
the near future. Anyone wishing to join 
the class will be furnished full particulars 
by communicating with him, care of Depart- 
ment of .Sanitation, Ancon, C. Z. 



PERSONAL. 

Lieut. -Col. Geo. W. Goethals returned to 
the Isthmus from the States on the Prinz 
August ]]'ilhelm on November 16. 

Mr. Herbert G. Squires, -American Minis- 
ter to Panama, accompanied by his family, 
.sailed from New Y'ork on the Colon Novem- 
ber 12, due at Cristobal, November IS. 

Mr. W. G. Comber, Resident Engineer at 
La Boca, returned to the Isthmus on the 
Heredia. November 13. 

Missing Men. 

Information is wanted in regard to .An- 
tonio Vila Tojo, who is said to have been 
employed by the Commission as a laborer 
at Tabernilla. He was last heard from by 
his relatives in March of this year. .Anyone 
having knowledge concerning him is re- 
quested to communicate with M. B.DePutron, 
-Assistant to the Chairman, Culebra, C. Z. 

Information is also wanted in regard to 
the following men: 

William E. Ridding, who is thought to be 
a foreman on the Isthmus. 

-Antonio P. de Treitas, who is said to have 
been a cook, and afterwards a painter at 
Ancon. His father in Trinidad last heard 
from him in September of this year. 

-Anyone having knowledge concerning 
either of these men is requested to commu- 
nicate with The Canal Record, Ancon, C.Z. 



Sojourners' Lodge. 

Sojourners' lodge. No. 874, A. F. and A. 
M., will meet on Saturday evening, Novem- 
ber 21, 1908, in extraordinary communica- 
tion. Work in the third degree. Master 
Masons in good standing fraternally invited 
to attend. G. G. Dedge, I. P. M., 

Actins Secretary. 



The two old French dredges that were 
found by the Americans on the banks of the 
Chagres at Frijoles have been floated into 
the river. One of them was taken out on 
November 11, and the other on November 
15. They will be taken to the Cristobal drj- 
dock. 



Pacific Masonic Club. 

There will be a meeting of the Pacific 
Masonic club in the lodge room, building 
No. 31, formerly occupied bj- Mr. Lipsett, 
on Saturday night, November 21. 

The ancient order of humility will be con- 
ferred. This is strictly a Panamanian de- 
gree, and any member wishing to have same 
will please send his name to the secretary 
before Frida}- night. 

There are several matters of importance 
coming up, and it is desired to have all mem- 
bers present. H. A. Gudger, 

fresTdenL 

RoLLiN s. Stubs, 

Secre/ary. 
Army and Navy Union Smoker. 

Goethals Garrison, No. 106, -Arm}' and 
Navy Union, will give a smoker at the 
Empire hotel on Saturday. November 21, at 
8.30 p. m. All army and navy men on the 
Isthmus, either regulars or volunteers, are 
invited and urged to attend. 

Homer Brett, 

Committee. 

Knights of Columbus. 

All third and fourth degree members of 
the Knights of Columbus are urgenth- re- 
quested to be present at an important meet- 
ing to be held in the I. C. C. lodge hall, 
Empire, on Sunday, November 22, 1908, at 
2.30 p. m. Business relative to charter ap- 
plication and election of council officers. 
J. L. Kerr, 

President. K. of C. Club. 

William J. Ergenzinger, 

Secretary- Treasurer, K. of C. Club. 



92 



THE CANAL RECORD 



CANAL WORK FOR OCTOBER. 

Monthly Report of the Acting Chairman to 
the Secretary of War. 

CuLEBRA, C. Z., November 14, 1908. 
The Honorable the Secretary' of If^ar. 
IVashitigton, D. C. 

Sir: I have the honor to submit the fol- 
lowing report of operations on the Isthmus 
for the month of October, 1908; 

The work of reorganization was continued. 
Effective October 12, 1908, the Division of 
Meteorology and River Hydraulics was abol- 
ished, and the duties pertaining to that Di- 
vision were assigned to the Assistant Engi- 
neer in charge of the Third Division in the 
office of the Chairman and Chief Engineer, 
the usual observations and measurements 
being continued under his supervision. 

Department of Construction and Engineer- 
ing. 

The following table summarizes the prin- 
cipal items of construction work accom- 
plished by the Atlantic, Central, and Pacific 
Divisions during the month: 



yards of material from the spillway and Mindi 
were dumped. 

SPILLWAY. 
Three steam shovels worked on the spill- 
way during the month, and removed a total 
of 44,397 cubic yards. 

PORTO BELLO. 

Work was actively continued, consisting 
of preparing a site for the power plant, strip- 
pin,g the earth from the quarry, and various 
municipal and Ijuilding work. 

NOMBRE DE DIOS. 

Dredging was commenced October 27, at 
the entrance to the Kato River, a portion of 
the sand removed being used in brick work 
at Porto Kello. 

CRISTOBAL. 

During the month a boiler and air pump 
for the aeration of water supply were installed 
at the Brazos Brook reservoir, and the sheet 
piling in the dam was completed. 

MUNICIPAL ENGINEERING. 

A large amount of grading, road building, 
construction of sewers and water works was 



Item. 


Unit. 


Atlantic. 


Central. 


Pacific. 


Total. 


Steam Shovel Bxcivation— 


Cubic yards 

Cubic yards 

Cubic yards 

Cubic yards 

Cubic yards 

Cubic yards 

Cubic yards 


155,142 
61,819 


1,540.417 
45,471 


139,206 
2.248 


1,834,765 


Auxiliary 


109,538 


Total 


216,961 

505,260 
57,638 


1.585,888 


141,454 

762.279 
3,600 

765,879 


1,944,303 


Dredge Excavation— 
In prism 


1 .267 539 




61,238 






Total 


562,898 




1,328.777 


Hand Excavation — 


10,992 
2,101 


10 992 














Cubic yards 








Total 




13,093 




13 093 




Cubic yards 

Tons (2240 lbs) 
Feet 










779.S59 


1.598 g^i 


907,333 


3,286.173 






48.783 
59.945 


327.75 
313,705 

14.1 
15.7 

""l3.2'43.5' 


15.79 
26,334.7 


392.323 




399,934.7 




Miles 


14.1 




Miles 


3.32 
147,762 


2.88 

2.038 

2,896 

336 

200 

0.50 

4.881 

6,640 

58,978 

11.710 

3,602 

3.426 

8.41 


21 90 




Cubic yards 


149.R00 




16,139.5 




Barrels 


302 

219 
0.459 
1.830 
2,400 


638 




Cubic yards 

Miles 




419 




1.48 
1.S96 
1.740 
16,563 


2 439 




Feet 

Feet 


8.607 




10,7£0 




Feet 


75 541 


Open drains and ditches cleaned 


Feet 












3,6112 


Daily average number of laborers 

Rainfall 


Inches 


2.304 
12.22 


7,666 
8.85 


13,396 



Atlantic Division. 

GATUN LOCKS. 

During the month, the total amount exca- 
vated from the lock site was 127,089 cubic 
yards, of which 109,667 cubic yards were 
from the Canal prism, and 17,422 cubic yards 
were from the proposed site for the handling 
plant dock. 

On October 20, pile driving was com- 
menced at the north end of the unloading 
cableway dock. Preparations were also made 
during the month to start work on the ce- 
ment shed dock. 

GATUN DAM. 

Dredge No. 82 excavated 57,638 cubic 
yards of material from the slip leading to 
the proposed docks for the handling plant. 
On the south toe of the dam 119,272 cubic 
yards of material were dumped, having been 
brought from the following points in the 
amounts stated: 

Cubic Yards. 

Bas Obispo 35.989 

Lock site 44,033 

Spillway 27,175 

Mindi 12,075 

On the north toe of the dam 39', 290 cubic 



accomplished at Cristobal and Gatun. The 
maintenance of municipal improvements was 
also given necessary attention. 

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION. >l 

Satisfactory progress was made on all 
buildings under construction. 

During the month the powder house at 
Mindi hills and the detonator house at that 
point were completed. 

Central Division. 

During the month the total "amount of 
material excavated in the Central Division 
was 1,598,981 cubic yards, of which 569,632 
cubic yards were classified as earth, and 
1,029,349 cubic yards as rock. 

Of this quantity, 1,585,888 cubic yards 
were removed by steam shovels, 10,992 cubic 
yards by hand at the Bas Obispo quarry, and 
2,101 cubic yards by hand at the new powder 
house site up the Chagres River. 

The quantity of material removed from 
the Canal prism was 1,551,409 cubic yards, 
while 33,603 cubic yards were removed from 
the Obispo Diversion, 8,180 yards in the 
Pedro Miguel yard, and 5,789 yards at the 
new powder house site. 

The dail)' average number of steam shovels 



at work dviringthe month was 49.55 as com- 
pared with 49.68 for the month of September. 
For comparison with the work done dur- 
ing the correspondin.g month of the previ- 
ous year in the area embraced in the Central 
Division, the following table has been pre- 
pared: 





Total amount of 
material exca- 
vated by steam 
shovels 


Classification of 

material. 


la 
III 


Si 

\ 

% 

be 

27 

27 


in 


■g 

■c 




w 


m 

< 


> > tf) 

< 


1907. 
Oct 

1908, 
Oct 


CM. yds. 
852,084 

1,585,888 


cii. yds. 
. 565,803 

1,018,357 


cu. yds. 
286,281 

567,531 


39.85 
49.55 


800 
1,185 



Rainfall durine the mouth: 1907. 13.95 inches: 1908, 
8,85 inches. 

The above table shows that the average 
output per shovel day was over 43 per cent 
greater in October, 1908, than in the cor- 
responding month of the previous year. 

The output of the Bas Obispo rock crusher 
for the month was 9, 5O8V2 cubic j-ards, and 
that of the Rio Grande crusher, to October 
16, 3,735 cubic yards, on which date this 
crusher was transferred to the Pacific Divi- 
sion. 

Pacific Division. 

DISTRICT NO. 1 — LOCKS AND DAMS. 

The total excavation in this district dur- 
ing the month amounted to 165,047 cubic 
yards, as follows : 

Cubic Yards. • 

From Pedro Miguel Lock site 47,6«8 

Accessory works at Pedro Miguel.... 1,187 

From Miraflores Lock site 71,201 

.\ccessory works at Miraflores 889 

From west dam at Miraflores 3,002 

From Canal prism, south of lock site. 17,315 

Ac. essory to Canal prism 172 

From Canal prism, south of lock, dredg- 
ing 24,593 

Total 166,047 

At Pedro Miguel, the track west of the 
lock site was extended to an intersection with 
the old location of the Panama Railroad, 
and raised within about six feet of the grade 
of the latter. This track will be used as a 
dump at the south end, its north end form- 
ing the toe of the west dam. The old bed 
of the Rio Grande River, at the south end 
of the lock site, was lowered for drainage 
purposes. 

At Miraflores the excavated material was 
deposited as a backfilling for the locks and 
in the toes of the west dam. The suction 
dredge Sandpiper began the work of cut- 
ting a channel from the Rio Grande River 
into the lower end of the lock site. 

Steam shovel work at Cardenas Hill is 
Hearing completion, and will probably be 
finished during the month of November. 

DISTRICT NO. 2— DREDGING, AND LA BOCA 
SHIPWA\. 

Five dredges were in operation during 
the month as follows: 



1 Cubic yards. 








Remarks. 












In pr'm 


Auxil'y 




Culebra 


Suction 


431.537 




Scow measurement 


Gopher 


L,adder 


103.517 




Place measurement 


Mole... 


L,adder 


56,340 




Place measurement 


No. 14.. 


Ladder 


89,391 




Place measurement 


Dipper. 


Dipper. 


56.901 


3.600 


Place measurement 


Total. 


737.6^6 


3.600 





Current repairs were made on dredges, 
clapets, launches, tugs and barges, including 
also erection of new plant. 

The borings to determine the character 



THE CANAL RECORD 



93 



and depth of sand at Cham^ Point were 
completed. 

The work of borhiif to determine the char- 
acter of the niiterial in the Canal prism be- 
tween the Miraflores Locks and deep water 
was continued, as well as the work of clear- 
ing the Canal line over which the dredges 
will operate. 

DISTRICT NO. 3— MUNICIP.\L ENGINEERING 
AND BUILDINGS. 

The principal items of new construction ac- 
complished in this di.strict during the mouth 
are included in a table given in the forego- 
ing part of this report. Roads, water works 
and sewers, drains and other municipal im- 
provements were miintiiued as usuil. 

The output of the Rio Grandj rock crusher 
from October 16, on which date it was turned 
over from the Central Division, was 2,511 
cubic yards. 

Mechanical Division. 

The usual work was perform; I in this di- 
vision in miintaininj and operitin,'- eqtiip- 
ment, electrical work, and the minufacture 
ofrepiir pirts and various material required 
in the construction of the Canal. 

Relocation of Panama R lilroad. 

Satisfactory progress was m ide iu the con- 
struction of connectin.; tracks from the pres- 
ent operated line of the railroad, in grad- 
ing, the construction of trestles for filling, 
and the construction of bridgesand culverts. 

In the Miraflores tunnel 935 cubic \'ard3 
of concrete were placed in the lining in the 
rock section. 

During the month, 3,831 linear feet of 
permanent track were laid on the relocated 
line, making a total of 47,407 feet to d_ite. 

The force of laborers during the month 
averaged 908 men. 

Quartermaster's Department. 

The surplus of labor on the Isthmus con- 
tinued. No laborers were imported during 
the month, and none are being recruited at 
this time. The agent of the Commission 
for the recruiting of European laborers, with 
headquarters at Paris, has been withdrawn 
and arrangements have been made with the 
agents of the several steamship line which 
have transported laborers to the Isthmus to 
act as recruiting agents for the Commission, 
in the event it should become necessary to 
secure additional Europeans. One of the 
recruiting agents in the West Indies has 
also been withdrawn. 

The additions to the gold force during the 
month were 262, and the separations 402; 
the net separations being 140. Of the addi- 
tions, only 82 were of men employed in the 
United States, the remainder having been 
employments or re-employments on the 
Isthmus, or transfers from the Panama 
Railroad Company. 

During the month a list of certain standard 
articles for supply on the Isthmus was pre- 
pared and submitted to the Division Engi- 
neers and the Division of Motive Power and 
Machinery for estimate as to quantities re- 
quired for the si.K months ending June 30, 
1909. This action was taken with a view to 
contracting for such articles, giving a min- 
imum and maximum amount within which 
supplies can be ordered during the six 
months, thus reducing to a very considerable 
extent the amount of advertising now nec- 
essary by the Washington office. 

An effort has also been made to standard- 
ize specifications on various articles on 
purchase requisitions to the United States. 



It is hoped that within six months nearly 
all of the usual articles required can be pur- 
chased under re:iaisition3 standardized and 
to govern in all cases. 

The only places at which there remain 
any considerable number of applications for 
family quarters, from applicants v\ho en- 
tered the service prior to January 1, 1908, 
are as follows: 

E:npire , 31 

G itiin 37 

Cristob \\ 70 

A few employes who entered the service 
subsequent to January 1, have been assigned 
family quarters, but there areapproximately 
300 applications oa file from e nployes of 
this class, which can not be met unless 
additional quarters are constructed. 
Subsistence Dapartm^nt. 

Careful statistics were compiled relating 
to the most important food components 
served at hotels, messes and kitchens. The 
average meat ration consumed per day at 
the hotels is 1.55 poan U; vegetables, one 
pound; and bread two-thirds of a pound. 
Since the veicetable season opened for pro- 
dace of standard refrigeration, vegetables 
hive been furnished to the hotels, messes 
and kitchens at merely the cost of handling 
theai and without any profit to the commis- 
sary. Tlie Spaniard consumes I1/2 pounds 
of bread per d ly, the ne,gro one pound, 
while in the white hotels the consumption 
has averaged but t vo-thirds of a pound. 

Darin.; the month 181,331 meals were 
served at the various hotels. There has been 
a constant diminution in the number of ra- 
tions served, botl". in the Spanish messes 
and in the colored laborers' kitchens. The 
attendance at the messes has fallen from 
about 4,000 per day, August 1, to 3,400 per 
dav, November 1. while the attendance at 
the kitchens has fallen from 6,000 per day, 
July 1, to 4,00) per dav, November 1. It is 
estimitetl there are about 7,030 unmarried 
colored laborers who do not eat in the 
kitchens or sleep in Commission quarters. 
Department of Civil AdmiTistratioi. 

Correspondence with the Foreign Office 
of theRepublicof Panama during the month, 
in addition to the usual routine matters, in- 
cluded negotiations respecting the following 
subjects: The stationing of Zone police at 
Porto Bello, in the Republic of Panama; the 
w itliholding of clearance papers from small 
craft docking at the Panama Railroad Com- 
pany's whirves at Colon and departing be- 
fore piyment of wharfage dues; the ap- 
proval of the maps of the joint bound iry 
survey of the Canal Zone, the action of the 
captain of the port of Colon in permitting, 
over the protest of the quarantine officer, 
the disembarkation of certain passengers 
aboard a vessel subject to quarantine, and 
the installation of water and sewer mains 
and construction of pavements upon certain 
streets in the city of Panama. 

COURTS. 

In the Supreme Court one civil case was 
settled during October, and one attorney 
was admitted. 

In the circuit courts, 10 civil cases and 22 
criminal cases were settled, and in the dis- 
trict courts 47 civil and 517 criminal cases 
were disposed of. 

DIVISION OF REVENUE^. 

The general revenues of the Canal Zone col- 
lected by the Division of Revenues amounted 
to $9,702.37. 

Ten vessels entered at and fourteen cleared 



from the port of .\ncon, and fifteen vessels 
entered at and si.xteen cleared from the 
port of Cristobal during the month. 

DIVISION OF POLICE .\ND PRISONS. 

During the month, 489 arrests were made, 
as compared with 639 for September. 

As Coroner of the Canal Zone the Chief 
of Police investigated seventeen deaths. 
DIVISION OK PUBLIC WORKS. 

The usual business of this Divi.sion was 
conducted during the month, including the 
installation of new connections, the issu- 
ance of permits for installation of plumbing, 
and the inspection of plumbing and sewers. 

In Panama, the collections on account of 
water rents for the quarter ended Septem- 
ber 30, aggregated $14,470.30, and in Colon 
the amount collected was $14,646.85. 

During the month 27,733.000 gallons of 
water were used in the city of Panama, and 
22,053,125 gallons in the city of Colon. 

DIVISION OF FIRE PROTECTION. 

During the month, six fires occurred in 
the Canal Zone. While the value of the 
property endangered is estimated at $55,- 
000.00, the damage to the buildings was in- 
significant. 

DIVISION OF SCHOOLS. 

The Canal Zone schools were opened Oc- 
tober 1. The teaching force consists of 23 
Americans and 19 colored West Indians. 
The total enrollment in the white schools 
was 622, and the average daily attendance 
493. In the colored schools, the total en- 
rollment was 1,073, and the average daily 
attendance 695. 

Department of S'lnitrttion. 
[The substance of the report of this de- 
partment was published in The Canal 
Record last week.] 

Respectfully, 

H. F. Hodges. 

Artins Chairman and Chirf Ensinecr. 
Central Division October S Hovel Record. 

The high record for steam shovels daring 
the month of October in the Central Division 
was made by shovel No. 230, at work in the 
Culebra district, which excavated 58,483 cu- 
bic yards in 27 days, an average of 2,166 
cubic yards per day. Shovel No. 259, work- 
ing 20 davs in the Empire District and 7 
days in the Culebra District, excavated 55,- 
535 cubic yards, an average of 2,055 cubic 
yards per day. B)th of these sho/els break 
the high record formerly held by shovel 
No. 256. 

LEGAL NOIaCiJd. 

In re EsLnte of AiKitole Laurence, Deceased —To 
any aud all person.s haviiijr any claim or claims 
a.:.Hiiist the estate of .\iiatole Laureiiee. decease.l. 
who died at Empire. Canal Zone. 011 the ISth day of 
September, lyo.i : 

You are hereby notified topresent yourclaims. duly 
verified, to Felix Laurence, administrator of said es- 
tate, or to the uiidersij^ned. on or before the 1st d.ty 
of June. 19nQ. or your claims will be forever barred 
according to law. 

Witness mv hand, this 6th day of November, A. D. 
190S. 

E. m. goolsby. 

Clerk of the Circitit Court. Second Judicial Circuit. 
Canal Zone, al Empire. 

Empire. C. Z.. November 2, 190?. 

F.stiteof I Administration. 
Michael Doyle ) 

All relatives of the late Michael Doyle, an Ameri- 
can, who died intestate at Ancon Hospital on the 
2utti of July, 190s, are hereby requested to communi- 
cate with the .administrator of the estate. Also nil 
persons owing the said estate will likewise communi- 
cate with the Administrator in order that a settle- 
ment may be effected : and all creditors of the estate 
must tile their claims, properly verified, with the Ad- 
minis rator within six months, or the same will be 
barred. _ 

F. H. SHEIBLEY, 
Administrator. 



94 



THE CANAL KECORD 



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS. 

Holiday on Thanksgiving Day. 

Cri.F.itKA. C. /-., Novjinber IJ. 19ns. 

ClKClLAK No. 2211. 

TIiiitiksiriviiiE Day. Thnrsday. Xovember ih, 19n.s. 
\vill he obser\ed as a holida\' in the Canal Zone, and 
as far as possible all public business will be sus- 
pent'ed on that day. 

H. F. Hodges. 
.Ai'//t/ii ChairiHafi and Chief Engineer. 

l^and Clerk, Panama Railroad. 

pANAM.\ Railroad Company. 

<_»i'FICE OF THE (*rENERAL MANAGER. 

Colon, R. P . November 11. 19ns. 
ClKCVLAR No. 12, 

Heads of Depailmevis — Effective this date: Mr. A. A. 
Grecnmaii is appointed land clerk in charg^e of land 
office matters, workine under the snper\'ision of, and 
reportinir direct tn the (Veneral Manager. 

HtRAM J. Slifer. 
General ,\fariazer. 

Panama Railroad Company Land. 

The following "Rules in connection with land mat- 
ters of the P.inania Railroail Company." became ef- 
fective September 23, 19n8, and are published for the 
benefit of all concerned. Copies of the circular 
printed in Knglish. French, and Spanish, together 
with the proper blanks, may be .secured from any 
agent of the company in the Canal Zone, from the 
cashier at Colon, and from the assistant cashier at 
Panama. 

Assif^ninentA — Any parties desiring to occupy au\' 
portion of the lauds of the Panama Railroad Com- 
pany will fill out regnlar blanks, copies of which can 
be secured in the offices of the General Manager and 
cashier at Colon, assistant cashier at Panama, or 
from any of the station agents of the Panama Rail- 
road Company. 

The aforementioned blank, after being filled out 
will be sent direct to the office of the General :\Iana- 
ger, when arrangements will be made to cover the 
necessary details. No one will be permitted to oc- 
cupy any land of the Panama Railroad Company ex- 
cepting \mder certain leases, agreements or written 
permissions. New occupation will not be allowed un- 
til application blank as aforesaid has been properly 
approved by the fieneral Manager. 

Transfers — Whenever any person holding property 
under either a lease, agreement or written permis- 
sion. desires to transfer the property to another party, 
regular application will be required, and the part\' 
transferring the property will be expected to show 
that he is the proper person holding the lands. The 
party to whom the property is to be transferred will 
also be required to sign the application for the trans- 
fer, which, after being approved, will give the new 
party possession of the land under lease, agreement 
or written permission, for the unexpired term for 
which the former party held the property. 

Payments — The acceptance of any moneys for the 
private use of any employe or agent of the Panama 
Railroad Company is forbidden 

No moneys will be expected or accepted by any 
employe of the Panama Railroad Company, or anj- 
other department, in connection with these appli- 
cations for assignm-^nts or for trairsfers, and no 
agent or employe of the Panama raiiroad will accept 
any moneys in connection with the land matters 
without giving a regular receipt which his been 
properly certified to by the auditor of the I'.inatna 
railroad. 

All moneys for rentals or other i)urposes will be 
paid, at Colon, to the cashier s ofhce: At Panama, to 
the assistant cashier's office. At all other points to 
the station agentsof the Panama Railroad Company. 
All other parties are forbidden to receive any moneys 
in connection with laud matters, and the present 
system of collecting rentals through collectors is 
herewith abandoned. Parties offering to pa.v raone>' 
for rentals to the cashier, assistant cashier or sta- 
tion agents, will be required to identify themselves 
by presenting their old rent receipts, so that the va- 
rious parties receiving money ma>- know that proper 
parties are jiaying the rental. 

The assistant cashier and the station agents will 
make daily reports to the cashier, who. in turn, will 
make consolidated report to the auditors office. On 
the first of each month, thecashier will report all out- 
standing accounts in connection with land matters 
to the General Manager and the a\iditor. 

Statins Land — After the application for assign- 
mentor transfer has been approved by the office of 
the General Manager, the lots will be staked out by 
the engineering department of the Panama rail- 
road. The chief engineer's office of the Panama 
railroad will be divided into three departments, 
namely; Constniction division, maintenance of way 



division, and land division. The chief etigineer 
will receive instructions direct from the General 
Manager for staking out properly and giving grades 
to which height of bvtilding itiust be erected in ac- 
cordance with nmnicipal requirements and sanitary 
rules. 

No moneys will be expectetl or allowed to be paid 
to anj employe of the Panama railroad for the engi- 
neering work that ma.\' be done in this connection. 

/^ases. Afftvements. and li'rif/en Permissions — Af- 
ter the lots have been sUiked out and the les.see indi- 
cates by his action that it is his intention to occupy 
the lands as per his application, a regular formal 
lease agreement or written permission will be issued, 
signed b>- the General Manager, and rentals will 
commence from the first of the siicc.eding month af- 
ter the papers have be^-n execnted by the General 
Manager. This paper will be delivered to the tenant 
by the cashier, assistant cashier, or one of the sta- 
tion agents. The tenant will be required to first sign 
all copies of the papers, and to pay the regular price, 
as shown, for the stamped paper on which it may be 
printed, but in doing so he will receive from the 
party delivering the lease, a properly authorized, 
certified "Bills Receivable" aj shown in this circular. 
He will, at that time, also bs required to pay the first 
month's rent, the receipt for which will be given to 
him on the '■Rent Form Receipt " as previously shown. 
The cashier, assistant cashier, or station agent se- 
curing signatures to papers, will immediately for- 
ward the original to the General Manager's office 
and deliver the second (carbon) copy to the tenant. 

Canee/iation of Privileges — Tenants who neglect to 
pay their rentals will be notified through the Office 
of the General Manager, and if they continue to neg- 
lect paying their rentals they will be removed from 
the property by proee-^s of law. 

Ij'jial .l/d/'/'V-jr— All legal questions that may arise 
will be handled direct between the General Manager 
and the legal department. 

We hope to have the hearty co-operation of all 
tenants in connection with these arrangements, 
which we know will avoid a great deal of the present 
confusion and annoyance. 

Theoffice of the General Manager will be available 
at any time for any complaints that the tenants desire 
to make in connection with the questions of assign- 
nients. transfers or leases, or in fact, in connection 
with any subject affecting the land matters of tKe 
Panama Railro.id Company. 

Hiram J. Slifer. 
General Manager. 



COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES. 

Activities of the Young Men's Christian 
Association. 

Total membership 1.298 

Total number of bowling games 4,724 

Number local bowling contests 15 

Number match bowling contests. 9 

Total number pool and billiard games 12,819 

Number of contestants in pool tournament 32 

Total income from soda fountain 51.640.64 

Number of different men using gymnasium, . 117 
Nntnberof men enrolled in systematic gym- 
nasium class work 77 

Total attendance of men using gymnasium ... 631 

Number of basket and indoor baseball games 12 

Number enrolled in chess and checker clubs. . 4n 

Number chess contests 4 

Number enrolled in glee clubs 40 

Number enrolled in dramatic and minstrel 

clubs U 

Number enrolled in orchestras S 

Number enrolled in educational classes 45 

Number of members of library 486 

Total number of books withdrawn 1.192 

Number of imported entertainments 5 

Attendance 911 

Number of local entertainments 5 

Attendance 1,425 

Number of functions outside association man- 
agement 10 

.\ttendance 1,130 

NumVier of afternoons for women 35 

Attendance 336 

Number evenings to which women were invited 20 

Attendance of women 805 

Number of committees 24 

Number of men on committees 131 

Number of men called on in hospital 56 

Number of letters written at public tables 5,100 

Total attendance at building 40,987 

Average per day 1 ,332 

BOYS" department (ages 10-16). 

Number of members 50 

Number of afternoons open to boys 51 

Total attendance 2.040 

Attendance at gymnasium exercises 376 



The Ernest Gamble Concert Party will give return 

entertainments as follows: Gorgona. Monday, Novem- 
ber 23: Cristobal, Taesda\-, November 24; Culebra. 
Wednesday, November 25: Empiije. Thursday, No- 
vember 26. 

A championship bowling tournament in singles 
and doubles will beheld at the Empire clubhouse on 
Thanksgiving Day, open to all members of the 
Y. M. C. A. An entry fee of $1 gold per man will be 
charged for each event, and each entry must be ap- 
proved by the secretary of the Y. M.C. A. of which 
the contestant is a member. The total pinfall for 
three games coinitin e.ich event. The following are 
the prizes: Gold medal to the winner of the tourna- 
ment in singles; a gold medal to each of the winners 
in the tournament of doubles: and a gold medal to 
the one making the highest individual score in the 
tournament. Silver medals will be presented to the 
men finishing second in both the singles and doubles, 
and bronze medals to the men finishing third in 
each tournament. A silver cup has been offered to 
be held as a permanent trophy by the association 
whose team makes the highest number of points in 
the tournament. 

CUl.KBRA. 

Great excitement prevailed at the mock municipal 
elections held Friday night. Tliree p'lrties were in 
the field during the early part of the week, the Peo- 
ple's, Conservatives, and Socialists, but on election day 
the Peoples and Socialist parties united. A parade, 
speeches, fireworks and music by the United States 
Marine Corps band wound up the active c.impaign. 
The following is a list of the successful candi- 
dates, all of whom were Conservatives except Alder- 
men Cnshing and Bdl: Judge, C. A. Mcllvaine: 
prosecuting attorney, M. B. DePutron; city clerk. 
R. H. Adams: sheriff, G. M. Douglas; city treasurer. 
J.H. Flynn: coroner, T. E. Tragsdorf. Aldermen: Ward 
1, J. H. Smith; ward 2, H. O. Hostetter; ward 3, S. E. 
Cushing; ward 4, H. E- Bain; councilmen-at-large: 
Ward 1, W. P. Copeland; ward 2, W. B. Huff; ward 3. 
W. J. Brown. 

At the pool and billiard contest, Saturday night, 
between Gorgona and Culebra. Culebra won four of 
five matches. b,\- the following scores: Pool — Bea- 
man. Culebra. 100. Pierson. Gorgona, 69; Stevens. Cu- 
lebra, 100, Reicher, Gorgona. 74; Tribolet, Culebra, 
75, Deverest, Gorgona, 100. Billiards: Floyd. Culebra. 
100, Adams. Gorgona. 90; Doty. Culebra. 100. Barlow. 
Gorgona, 86. 

EMPIRE. 

The Empire bowling team which was tied with 
Cristobal for first place in the league, won three 
straight games from that team on .Saturdaj- evening. 
November 14. The scores were as follows: Empire— 
899, S33. 816: Cristobal— 761. 751. 793. 

Mr. Guy C. Mitchell, of Auburn, N. Y., arrived on 
the Allianca, November 13. He will be secretary of 
the V. M. C. A. at the Gorgona clubhouse. 

The Y. M. C. A, Choral Club will make its first ap- 
pearance on Friday- evening. November 20. The club 
has a membership of thirty-five, and will give an en- 
tertainment known as 'An Old Folks' Concert." The 
program will consist of five choruses by the club, 
music by the orchestra, quartets, duets, solos, and 
readings. 

Misdirected Letters. 

Division of Post^. Customs and Revenues, 
Ancou, C. Z.. November 18, 1908. 
The following insufficientl>' addres.sed letters, origi- 
nating in the United States and its possessions, have 
been received in the office of the Director of Posts, 
and may be obtained on request of addressee: 
Allison, W. W. Mallernee. Wm. N. 

Alwin. W. J. McCafferty. John 

Barnett. R. J. Murray. Alex. 

Barry. E. S. Myke, John 

Barth, G. H. Noland, C. Powell, Jr. 

Bozeman, W. J. Orr. Wm. T. 

Butler. Mi.ssMacle Palmer, A. M. 

Davis. John M. Potts. Frank A. 

Delinois & Co., Charles Reed. Geo. T. 
Durham, Henry W. Roach, Mr. 

Goodwyn, J. N. Rogers. Flniest 

Griffin. John J. Sanderson. Frank E. 

Gros.se, Mrs. (iustavF. Schwartzenlutzer, Joseph 
Grout. F. E. Staals, John 

Harry, S. B. Staley, Frank S. 

Hernandez. Damaso Stanley, Miss I,. B. 

Hyde. Wm. H. Starbuck, D. A. 

Isaza, P. Alcide Stratton. David 'V. 

Jole. Charles M. Turner. I^awreuce 

Kehoe. Wm. Walstou. W. H. 

I^ewis, Annie Whaler. J. W. 

I.ove, William, William. H. H. 

Mahon.John Woods. Anderson 

Mahoney. Lewis 



The small plots of vacant ground near Pier 
11 and around the cold storage plant, at Cris- 
tobal, have been seeded in grass and shrub- 
bery has been planted in them. 



THE CANAL KECuKD 



95 



PERFORMANCE OF STEAM SHOVELS 



MONTHLY RECORDS IN THE ATLANTIC, CENTRAL. AND PACIFIC l>IVISIOXS 
The subjoineJ tables show the monthly records of steam shovel work in Canal excivations since .American occupation 



COI,ON DI.STRICT 



ATLANTIC DIVISION 



GATUN I<OCKS. 



GAl'LTN SPIL1,VV.\Y. 



c2i 



^■5 ^ 
o tiS 



ii'. 



Tj ^ ^ 

3 tfj >. 
O 



K c-^c. 






3 O 



« c b(i:j v-^ 



V-S li-Z 



;*J2n 3^- :=•«; 

<: ;< 






!>*:; ° - .= 



■ — ^1* 






1907— 

July 

August 

September . 

October 

November.. 
December. . 

1908— 

January 

February . . 

March 

April 

May 

June .... 

July 

August 

September.. 
October 



1.8 
1.54 



1.80 1 
1.96 



24 
27 I 

24 I 
25 

26 
24 
26 
25 
25 
26 
26 
26 
25 
27 



56 
283 
601 
761 
833 
939 

1.218 

1.368 

1,574 

1.349 

1.087 

684 

5S7 

741 

713 

859 



731 
7.629 
14.419 
20.539 
20.002 
23.473 



11.12 
16.37 

8.03 
19.27 
14.27 

5.53 



31.418 


3.18 


32.816 


1.29 


40.925 


2.81 


33,718 


1.47 


27,167 


17.30 


17,790 


13.33 


15.269 


13.67 


18.532 


15.88 


17.840 


8.52 


23.202 


8.87 



1907— 

August 3.70 

September...'... 4.12 

October 5.00 

November 5.00 

December 5.00 

1908— 

J.'uiuary 5.72 

February 6.01 

March 7.00 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September, 
October 



24 
27 
24 
25 

26 
24 
26 



1.013 
1.014 
1,286 

1.302 
1,222 
1,206 



7.00 
5.76 


25 
25 


1.288 
1.156 


4.8S 


26 


1.129 


3.77 


26 


1.396 


3.50 


26 


1.431 


3.44 


25 


1.21S 


3.96 


27 1 


1.026 



21.176 
21.il9 
27.3.55 
24.327 
32.159 

33.840 
29.333 
31.366 
32.210 
28 .891 
29.364 
36.291 
37.21,S 
30,4,59 
27.694 



16.37 
8.03 
19.27 
14.27 
5.53 

3.18 
1.29 
2.81 
1.47 
17.30 
13.33 
13.67 , 
I3.ti8 
8.52 I 
S.87 

I 



1907— 

July 

August 

September.. 

October 

November.. 
December .. 

190S— 
January .. . . 
February . . 

March 

I April 

May. 

June 

July 

August 

September.. 
October 



1.33 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 

3.00 
3.75 
4.54 
5.00 
4.42 
3.50 
3.00 
2.85 
2.08 
2.96 



26 


423 


10.998 


11.12 


S/ 


498 


13,433 


16.37 


24 


757 


18.158 


8.0.^ 


27 


745 


20.118 


19.27 


24 


854 


20.494 


14.27 


2o 


1.395 


.34.878 


5.53 



26 


1.264 


32.86,? 


_'t 


!,183 


28.402 


2b 


1.311 


34.149 


25 


1,184 


29.598 


23 


908 


22,701 


25 


1.117 


29.045 


26 


981 


25.514 


26 


783 


20.351- 


25 


792 


19.812 


27 


,555 


14.999 



3.18 
1.29 
2.81 
1.47 
17.30 
13.3.' 
13.67 
15.88 
8.52 
8.S7 



CENTRAL DIVISION 



CULEBRA SECTION 









Output per shovel 


Rainfall 










(cubic yards). 


Cinches) . 


E ^-i 




3 O 






IsK 








Period. 




ar 
•£t: E 


- 2 


K 




C (U 3 J! _■ 

3 -J — ^ 1' 
" rt " UJZ 




1- 


!= O - 


1 £ 


g 






1906— 








I 






12.83 
12.48 


26 
■ 23 


363 . 9.430 
587 13,494 


1.28 
0.57 


1.19 
0.64 








March 


12.37 
12.33 


27 

24 


716 19,335 
720 17,289 


0.45 
11.42 


1.34 
8.43 




April 




May 

June 

July 


14.81 
16.6* 


27 
26 
3,=; 


581 
539 
378 


15.684 
14,026 
9,441 


7.54 
6.92 
14.61 


7.25 
8.94 
20.26 




123 
127 


August 




27 


536 


14,461 


11.84 


12.97 


132 




21.33 
22.67 
20.46 


24 
27 
24 


568 
532 
459 


13,664 
14,373 
10,833 


7.41 
3.97 
21.05 


6.22 
8.46 
19.19 






128 


November 


120 


December 


22.68 


23 


491 


12,267 


8.15 


9.09 


lOS 


1907— 
















January 


31.04 


26 


702 


18,248 


0.08 


0.00 


104 




39.87 
43.88 


23 
25 


674 
■ 741 


15,966 
18,530 


0.13 
0.16 


0.49 
0.08 


lOS 


March 


105 


April 


44.12 


26 


765 


19,884 


0.09 


0.04 


110 


May 


.?1.70 


26 


833 


21,674 


6.22 


7.45 


118 




38.28 
43.38 


25 
26 


651 
680 


16,266 
17,670 


13.53 
9.85 


14.74 
9.42 


118 


July 


118 


August 


39.70 


27 


729 


19,680 


11.28 


11.81 


.120 


September 


38.50 


24 


811 


19,468 


10.86 


11.38 


123 


October.. 


37.63 


27 


813 


21,963 


15.44 


15.27 


123 




41.88 
42.72 


24 
25 


784 
965 


18.818 
24,113 


10.40 
1.47 


6.91 

2.30 


123 




124 


1908- 
















January 


43.42 


26 


1,084 


28,177 


0.75 


0.91 


125 


February 


43.67 


24 


1.186 


28,475 


0.00 


0.01 


124 


March 


42.19 


26 


1.171 


30,451 


0.41 0.13 


125 


April 


41.28 


25 


1,202 


30,031 


1.36 


1.67 


127 


May 


41.56 


25 


918 


22,948 


12.91 


12.63 


129 




42.92 


26 


1,011 


26,281 


8.21 


8.76 


126 


July (old ChagresDi\nsion included).. 


52.57 


26 


1.07J. 


27,848 


11.79 


13.23 


121 


August do do 


52.58 


26 


1,122 


29,184 


8.11 


7.74 




September du do 


49.68 


25 


1,178 


29,443 


9.76 


13.74 




October do do 


49.55 


27 


1,195 


32.270 


8.87 


9.03 


• 



CHAGRES SECTION 



Period - 









< 



i si; 



"— ^ ^ 



17 ?; -c! ,r - 



1907— 






August 


0,15 


27 


.September 


0.92 


24 


October 


2.22 


27 


November 


3.00 


24 


December 


6.12 


25 ■ 


1908— 






January 


S.U 


26 


February 


10.33 


24 


March 


11.47 


26 1 


April 


11.76 
11.68 
12.23 


25 1 


Mav 


25 


June 


26 


•July 







12.20 
14.71 
13.62 
9.85 
2.26 

0.20 
0.11 
0.41 
1.81 
13.18 
6.55 



*After July 1, lyus. the old Chayrcsaud tulebra divi- 
sions were consolidated in the Central Division. No 
sepanite record for steam shovels in the old divisions 
h.as been kept since that date. Figure.* for July and 
August under "Culebra Section ' iaciu.le work done 
in the whole Central Divisioji. 



716 


19.333 


976 


23.420 


428 


11.544 


612 


14,6S1 


630 


15.756 


797 


20.720 


798 


19.144 


1.U82 


28,094 


1.121 


28,018 ! 


SOS 


20.197 1 


1.013 


26.341 1 

1 



Summary for the moulh uf October, iyu.S: 
Average number of shovels at work. 65.20. 
Average output per shovel per day. S31 cubic \ards 
Average output per shovel per month. 22.441). 
The working day for steam shovels is eight hours. 



PACIFIC DIVISION 



PEDRO MIGUEI* W>CKS 



Period. 



1903- 

June 

July 

August 

September. 
October. . . 





. 




;>^ 


2 




3 O 


U-'O r.* 

m3 


1^ 


U U 


■iH 


'u? 


tj-jS 


iV^ 


— 


I' — 


t: f^ 


•^.s 














u u -^ 


E 3 " 










V H" 






















< 


r. 







c 


3! 


0.50 


26 




6CK) 


19.134 


4.9S 


1.00 


26 




626 


16.282 


9.53 


1.00 


26 




.S16 


21,203 


9.31 


1.84 


25 




608 


15.204 


7.56 


2.66 


27 




681 


18.374 


S.41 




LA BOCA DISTRICT 



Period. 



3 O 



•o«£- i-! 



r^i, ^'S 



.. o u 
4* — ' a/ 



S.C •/. a 2 ji 



O 



1908— 

March 3.50 

April 4.50 

May ; 5.75 

June 3.80 

July ; 3.80 

August ! 3.70 

September I 3.78 

October i 3.11 



1908— 

March 1.00 

.\pril 1.00 

May ! 1.00 

June 1.00 

Julv 1.00 

August 0.92 

September , 0.97 

October I 1.00 



26 
25 
25 
26 
26 
26 
25 
27 



476 
452 
688 
562 
623 
739 
750 
648 



12,.'60 
11..300 
17.200 
14.630 
16,200 
19.214 
18.743 
17.487 



0.00 
0.76 
8.65 
4.97 
5.6f 
10.48 
5.93 
7.51 



96 



THE CANAL KliCOKL) 



COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT. 

COMMISSARY CORRESfONUENCE. 

Patrom of the Commissary Departiinnt, 
when death!"- with the Cristobal office, 'will 
address their individual orders, deposits, 
etc., to the Order Room, Commissary De- 
partment, Building A^o. 2, Cristobal. 

Complaints should be made in separate 
letters and addressed to the Subsistence Of- 
ficer, Duildins: No. 2, Cristobal. 

JOH.X BURKE. 
Manager. 
APt>ym't'd : 
EUGENE T. ir/LSON. 

Sudsis/rjtce Officer. 

SUPPLY OP OYSTERS. 

One thousand sjallons of ovsters have been 
ordered by the Subsistence Department. 
They will be sent to the Isthmus in partial 
shipments, and in such quantity that they 
can be served at all Commission hotels at 
least once a week. 

Rolls, baked daily, are shipped from 
the bakery on the afternoon passenger train 
from Cristobal. They are delivered to tl-.e 
Commission hotels along the Line on the 
same evening, so that employes may be 
served with them the following morning for 
breakfast. 

The hours during which commissaries are 
open are as follows : 

Cristobal and Culebra, 8 a. m. to 12.30 
p. m.; 2 p. m. to 7 p. m. 

k\\ other commissaries, 8 a. m. to 1 p. m.; 
3 p. m. to 7 p. m. 



COMMISSARY PRICES 

For week beyiiininy November 16; 

FKKSH MEAT.S. 

/V/tr. 

Mutton— Stewiiic Per 11) 6 

Shoulder aud neck (not under 

6 pounds) |jerll> 7 

Htilire foreguarter (not uiuier 

10 pounds) peril) > 

l.e!^ (s to 10 pounds) per lb 16 

Short-cut chops per lb 11 

Lnnih^Stewins per lb 6 

Entire forequarter peril) K 

l,eg (6 to S pounds) per lb 27 

Chops per lb 29 

Veal— Stewing per lb 10 

Entire forequarter 115 to 20 Ibsi.-.per lb 11 

Loin for roasting: peril) 21 

Chops perlb 21 

Cutlets perlb 26 

Beef— Suet I)erlb 4 

Soup per 11) S 

Stew -iJer lb 12 

Conied per lb., 12. 14. 16 

rot roa^t (from sirloin butt) per lb 17 

Rib-roast, second cut (not under 3 

pounds) per lb !« 

Kill-roast, shortcut (not under SM: 

pounds) peril) 2J 

Sirloin roast perlb 29 

Rump roast peril) 29 

Porterhi.nse roast perlb 29 

steak, round perlb 23 

Kib per lb 24 

.Sirloin per II) 29 

Porterhouse per lb 29 

Rump per lb 29 

Tenderloin per lb 30 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Livers— Beef per lb U'.j 

Calf each 65 

Sausage— Pork perlb l.S 

Lebenvurst perlb 17 

Sweet bread— Veal each 1.20 

Beef perlb 30 

Pies' feet per 11) 14 

Eggs, fresh dozen 40 

POULTRV AND GAME. 
Chickens — Fanc.v Roasting, large. .each. 1.40and l.li) 
Fowls, medium aud large each. 8i'c. and 1.00 



Ducks, fatted eaci; 

Turke.xs per 11) 

S<inal)s .. ., each 

Capons 

CfUlCl) AND PICKI.HIl MICATS. 

Il.icon — Strips per lb 

lC))glish. breakfast sliced per lb 

Ham — Sugar-cured, sliced i)er lb 

One-half, for boiling per lb 

Ferris per lb 

Rcf-f. s;iU. family ; cr lb 

Salt pork peril) 

DAIRY PKdOLCTS. 

Butter— Prints, prime qnalit.v perlb 

Cheese — Neufch.itel each 

Swiss pL-rll) 

Edam .. each 

Camembcrt per lb 

McLaren's : jar 

Pinxter's tin 

Gouda perlb 

French cheese in tins — Camembert. Roque- 
fort. Brie. Xenfchatel tin 

Milk. RriarcHIT botile 

VEGETABLES AND FRUirS. 

Lettuce per lb 

Cauliflower per lb 

White potatoes per lb 

.Sweet potatoes perlb 

Cabbage perlb 

Onions perlb 

Cucumbers ner lb 

Yan)S perlb 

Beets -■ per lb 

Celery bunch 

Turnips per lb 

Lemons dozen 

Oranges dozen 

Apples er lb 

Pears ■ per lb 

Grapefruit each 

Grapes. M.ilaga per lb 

Cranberries perlb 



1.22 
24 
4,i 

2.40 



S26 

§2i 

§21 

20 

16 

13 

40 

6 

31 

1 05 

1,1 



21 
25 

12 

10 

3'/, 

IVi 

4 

3'?. 

IS 

3K 

3 

15 

3 

24 

18 

5 

10 
3 
15 
12 



§ Sold only from cold-stonige and not from Cora 
missaries. 

Stages of the Chagres. 

Maxiinuni height of Chagres above Inw 
water for the week ending midnight, No- 
vember 14, 1908 : 

, Stations. 





> 


0) 

'n 

< 


g 

o 


o 







Height of low water 














above mean sea 














level, feet 


129 


92 


46 





n 


() 


Maximum height ab. 














low w.iter. feet; 














Sunday. Nov. S. ... 


2.4 


2.9 


4.H 


10 4 


5.8 


■/.6 


Monday, Nov. 9 


3.4 


2.6 


4.5 


S.6 


4.1 


5.5 


Tuesday, Nov. 10... 


3.4 


3.2 


4.5 


7.9 


3.5 


4.4 


Wedn'sday. Nov. It 


12.9 


S.9 


13,0 


12 6 


4.7 


6.6 


Thursday. Nov. 12.. 


5.9 


5,2 


13.0 


16.0 


6.9 


9.1 


Friday, Nov. 13 


3.0 


3.1 


4.7 


11 2 


6.4 


S.4 


.Saturday. Nov. 14... 


61 


5.4 


S.4 


ll.S 


47 


64 


Maximnni for week.. 


12.9 


.S9 


13.0 


16.0 


6.9 


9.1 



Rainfall, November 1 tol4<, 

Cmidnicht ro ;\tii)N 

Stations. 

Affatiiic Division — 

Cristobal ' 

Brazos Brook 

Gatui! 

Bohio 

Central Division — 

Tabernilla 

San Pablo 

Bas Obispo 

Gambon 

Empire 

Camacho 

Culebra 

Rio Grande 

Pacific Division — 

Pedro Miguel 

L.'i Boca 

Aiicoji 

.Atlantic Coast — 
Porto Bello 

tlppfr Ckasrcs. 

EI Vigia 

.•Vlhajuela 



19U8, Inclusive 

IGHT.) ^ 

Maximum 

in Total, 

one d:i>' 



3.65 
2.31 
2.36 
2.03 

.83 
.83 

1.32 
.i-0 
.40 

1.67 
.49 
.72 

2.24 
.95 
1.00 



13.57 
10.22 
9.29 
8.22 

4.16 
4.30 
4.49 
4.53 
209 
4.30 
2.:8 
2.57 

5.95 
4.34 
5.-7 



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN YESskLS. 

llie fiillowing is a list of the sailings of the Pan- 
am;) R;iilr(iiKl Steiimship Company, of the Royal 
.M.iil .Steiim P;icket Company, of the Han)bnrg- 
Am-'tic:in I.ijie. aud of the L'nited Fruit Company's 
Li' '■. the Paiutma K.ailroad Com I'any's dates being 
sul lect to change : 

l-'KOM NEW YORK TO COLON. 

JIag.lilena R.-M Saturday Nov, 14 

l'an;in):i P, R. R,Tuesday Nov, 17 

Prin/ loachi.i H,-A Saturday Nov. 21 

Fii;,nicc P, R. R.Monday Nov. 23 

Ori.io.;o R.-M Saturdiiy Nov. 28 

Adv;i;)ce P. K. R.. Saturday Nov. 28 

Allimca .. P. R. R.Thursday Dee. 3 

Prliz Aug. \Vilhelnt...H.-A S;iturday Dec. 5 

Colo;) P. R. R.Tuesday Dec, 8 

Atralo R.-M Saturday Dec. 12 

Panama P. R. R.Monday Dec. 14 

Finance P. R.R.Saturday Dec. 19 

Priuz loachiin H.-A Saturday Dec. 19 

Adv.;.ire P. R. R.Thursday. ...Dec. 24 

Trent R.-M .Saturday Dec. 26 

AlHanca P. U. R.Tuesday Dec. 29 

Colo;i P. R. R.Monday Jan. 4 

Panama P. R. R.Saturday Jan. 9 

Fin;ince P. R.R.Thursday Jan. 14 

Advance P. R. R.Tuesday Jan. 19 

Alliatica P. R. R Monday Jan. 25 

Colon P. R. U.Saturday Jan. 30 

All the stejimers of the Hanib)irg-.\merican and 
Royal Mail lines call at Kingston enroute to Colon. 

FROM C01.0X TO NKW YORK 

P. R. R.Friday Nov. 



.Mlianc;) 

I'linz Aug. \Vilhelm...H.-.\ Tnesd;i 



.Nov. 

.P. R. K.Wedne lay. .Nov. 

.P. R. R.Mond;iv Nov. 

.R.-M Tuesday Dec. 

.P. R. R., Sunday Dec. 

.H.-.\ Tuesday Dec. 

R. R.Friday Dec. 

M Tuesd;iy Dec. 



Colon 

Panama 

Atrato 

Finance 

Prinz Joachim 

Advance P 

Trent R. 

AUianca P. R. R.Wednesday ..Dec. 

Colon P. R. R. .Monday Dec. 

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm...H.-A Tuesday »...l)ec. 

Panani;i P. R. R. Sunday Dec. 



20 

24 

25 

30 

I 

6 

8 

11 

15 

16 

21 



. . Dee. 

.Jan. 
.Jan. 
..Jan. 
.Jan. 



Tagus R.-M Tuesday .. 

Finance P. R. R.Friday 

P)-inz Joachim H.-A Tuesday .. 

Advance P. R. R.Wednesday 

Allianca P. R. R.Monday.... 

Colon P. R. R.Sunday Jan. 

Panama P. R. R.Friday Jan. 

Finance..., P. R- R.Wednesday. Jan. 

.\dvance P. R. K.Monday Feb. 

Allanca P. R. R.Sunday Feb. 

Colon P. R. R.Friday Feb. 

FROM NEW ORLE.\NS TO COLON'. 

P.arismitia tl.F.C. Saturday Nov. 21 

Heredia U.F.C... Saturday Nov. 28 

TROM COLON TO NliW ORLEANS. 

Cartago U.F.C. .Tuesday Nov. 24 

Parismina U.F.C. .Tuesday Dec. 1 

FRO:u COLON TO BARBADOS. CALLING AT TRINIDAD. 

.M.agdalena R.-M Tuesday Nov. 24 

Orinoco R.-M Tuesday 

Atrato R.-M Tuesday 

Trent R.-M Tuesday 

FROM COLON TO NEW ORLF,.\NS VIA KINGSTON. 

Jamaican Leyland Line, .about. .Nov. 22 

.\nlilli;in Levkmd Line, .about. .Nov. 30 

The P.ina;na r.ulro;id steaniships sail at 3 p. ra 
from dock at Cristobal direct to New York. 

The Prinz steamers of the Hamburg-American line 
s:]il front Colon at 1 p. m. via Kingston, Jamaica, 
for New Vork. 

.\\\ Royal .M.ailsteamersmentionedaboveleaveearly 
in the morning from Colon via Kingston. Jamaica, 
for New York. All mail and passengers should be 
on board early on day of sailing. 

The steamers of the United l^'ruil Company's line 
s;iil front New Orle;ins at 10 a. m. for Colon, calling 
at Puerto Barrios, and from Colon at 1,30 p. m,, via 
Port Liiuon atid Puerto Barrios, for New Orleans, 

Siiilings of the F'rettch line (Cie, Ci^n^nde Trans- 
atl'intiipie) for Venezuelan ports, Martinique and 
Guadeloupe on the 3rt and 2nth of each month. 



.Dec. 
.Dec. 

.Jan. 



8 
22 
5 



1.85 
1.35 



7.77 
5.37 



The following steamers have recently arrived at 
La Boca: November 7, Barraconta from Central 
America; Novembers, Salvadorian iivwis&x , Presidente 
from S tlvador; Noveniber 10, .Xnfport from San Fran- 
cisco: Noveniber 13, Panama from Valparaiso. De- 
partttres were; November 10, Cecil for southern ports; 
November 11, Peru for San Francisco, and Chile for 
Valparaiso. 



CANAL 




RECORD 



Volume II. 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEAIBER 25, 1908. 



No. 13. 



The Canal Record 

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of the 
ISTHMiAN CANAL COMMISSION 

"The Canal Record""^ is issued J ree oj charge, one 
copy earh. in all employes oJ the Commission and Pan- 
ama Ra.lroad Company 7i'kose names are on the "sold" 
roll. E-vtya copies and back nitmhers can be obtained 
from tlie nervs stands of the Panama Raiiioad Com- 
pany for five cents each. 



Address all Communications 

THE CANAL RECORD 

Ancon, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama. 

No communication , either jor publication or request- 
ing injormation. will receive attention tniless signed 
with the /ull name and address oJ the U'riier. 

NOTES OF PROGRESS. 

Vacations in Jamaica. 

On recomnenditiou of the Chief Sanitary 
Offiiar. the Chairman of the Isthmian Canal 
Com-nission his decided to include in the 
1-ist of places where employes may take their 
annual leave, the parishes of Manchester, 
St. Anne and St. Andrew in Jamaica, as 
these parishes are above an altitude of 3,000 
feet and will affjrd the change of climate 
required by Commission rejjulations. 

Ne\r Interlocking Switclies. 

A modern system of interlocking switches 
was put in operation at the Las Cascadas 
yard on Monday, November 23. The tower 
is at the north end of the railroad station, 
and the eight levers assembled there oper- 
ate three switches, four signals and one de- 
railing switch. 

This improvement in the yard will enable 
empty trains, returning from the dump at 
Tabernilla, to be run into the Whitehouse 
yard without loss of time, as the switching 
will be done mecliinically instead of by hand. 



Canal Medals. 

The design for the medals which, in ac- 
cordance with the proposals of President 
Roosevelt, are to be distributed to all em- 
ployes of the Isthmian Canal Commission 
who have served two years or more on the 
Canal work, has been finished by Victor D. 
Brenner, the medalist in charge of the work, 
and he is now cutting the dies. The medal 
will be about an inch and a half in diameter, 
or the size of a Panama silver dollar, and 
will be struck in bronze. On the obverse 
there will be a portrait of President Roose- 
velt which was modelled b.\- Mr. Brenner at 
Oyster Bay, in July last. It is a three-quar- 
ter view of Mr. Roosevelt, facing to the left. 
Around the border will be the inscrip- 
tion "For two years' continuous service on 
the Panama Canal." 

The reverse of the medal bears a bird's-eye 



view of the Culebra Citt, in the finished Ca- 
nal, with steamers passing through, with 
Gold Hill to the left and Contractor's Hill 
to the right. Above the horizon, in incised 
letters, is inscribed. "The Land Divided, 
the World United," and around the rim, 
"Presented bv the President of the United 
States." Below appears the shield of Pan- 
ama and under it will be the name of the 
recipient on a name plate. Each medal will 
be numbered in a circle below the portrait, 
and will hang from a suspension bar. With 
each year's additional service on the Canal 
a bar will be added. It is expected that the 
medals w ill be awarded in December. 



Sunken French Dredge. 

The sea-going ladder dredge Gop/ier,\\'h\c\\ 
is working its way up the Canal prism from 
La Boca toward Corozal, has encountered an 
old French ladder dredge of the Belgian 
type, which had been sunk at a p^int where 
the Rio Grande crosses the old French 
canal, about a mile above La Bica wharf. 
The dredge had apparently been turned over 
and sunk in the same position in which it 
had been at work as the side chains, stern 
chains and head chains were still fastened to 
to their moorings. In addition to these, 
other chains, probably used for moorings, 
have been found at various points in and 
across the Canal prism, and a diver has been 
kept constantly at work for some time past 
in locating and making fast to them so that 
they could be taken up and a free passage 
made for the Gopher. Up to this time over 
10,000 linear feet or nearly two miles of 
chain have been removed. This work has 
to be done in order to prevent the old chain 
from becoming entangled in the dredge ma- 
chinery. The old dredge will have to be 
blown up by dynamite and removed bj- the 
wrecking barge. 



Boiler Hquipment for Gatun and Miraflores. 

The contract for twelve boilers with up- 
takes, breeching, and induced draft system, 
to be used in the power plants at Gitun 
Locks and Miraflores Locks was awarded, 
on September 27, to the D'Olier Engineer- 
ing Company of Philadelphia. The equip- 
ment for each plant will include six boilers. 

Each of the boilers specified has a nominal 
rating of 400-horsepower, is equipped with 
Foster superheaters, and will generatesteam 
at 205 pounds absolute pressure, and 150 
degrees Fahrenheit of superheat. The grate 
area will be 66'A square feet, and the fur- 
nace volume 40y cubic feet. The boilers 
are designed with a large combustion furnace 
for the use of oil as fuel, but they are also 
to be fitted with Ajax shaking grates in 
order that coal may be used if the emergency 
arises. The induced draft system includes 
fans of the Sturtevant Company's make, one 
fan to be driven by a vertical engine, and 
the other by an electric motor. A motor- 



driven air compressor to furnish air for 
cleaning the generators and high tension 
electrical apparatus is also included in the 
contract. All the steam piping in the boiler 
room, two vertical boiler feed pumps, and 
a Cochrane open feed water heater will be 
part of the plant. The contractors have 
sublet the contract for the water tube boilers 
to the E. Keeler Company of Williamsport, 
Pa. 

The power plant at Miraflores, for which 
six of the boilers are intended, will be the 
plant that will furnish the power in the con- 
.struction of thelocksand, after the comple- 
tion of the Canal, for operating them in the 
emergency of the hydraulic plant giving 
out. At Gatun Locks the plant will furnish 
the power for unloading at the dock, for 
the motors on the lock cableways, and for 
the cable road which will be used in the 
construction of the locks, and it will probably 
be maintained as an emergency plant after 
the Canal is completed. The plant for 
operating the locks at Gatun will be a hy- 
draulic power plant using water wasted from 
Gatun Lake. 



October Report of Quarters. 

The report of the Chief Quartermaster for 
the month of October shows that among 
"gold" employes, 1,407 quarters, divided 
among 751 buildings, were occupied by mar- 
ried employes and their families, and that 
3,294 bachelors lived in 1,950 rooms, in 179 
buildings. 

Among European (silver) employes, 335 
quarters in 80 buildings were occupied by 
married European laborers and their fami- 
lies and 5,015 Eu/opeans were in bachelors' 
quarters, divided among 135 rooms in 129 
buildings. 

The married West Indian laborers (silver 
employes) were liviu'^ in 1,013 quarters di- 
vided among 231 buildings, and 5,515 West 
Indian bachelors lived in 247 rooms in 134 
buildings. 

Work at La Boca. 

The dredging for the basin at the new 
landing stage for oil ships at La Boca is com- 
pleted, and the pipe and moorings have been 
placed in position. The pipe to the old land- 
ing stage is being taken up and the dredge 
J/oA'is nuking a deep water channel from 
the Canal prism to the marine shops. The 
pipe to the old landing stage crossed the 
ship channel to themarineshop and was only 
six feet below the surface of the water at 
low tide, thus preventing ships from reach- 
ing the shipyard except at high tide. When 
the new channel is completed ships will be 
able to go to the shipyard at any stage of 
the tide. 

Five of the small boats in use with the 
dredging fleet at La Boca have had gasoline 
motors installed, three skiffs have had a 
3-horsepower motor put in, and two whale 



98 



THE CANAL RECORD 



NOTES OF PROGRESa 

{Continued) . 



boats, each 28 feet long, have hid 8-horse- 
power motors installed. This will expedite 
work in the fleet, as the dredges are working 
too far apart to make rowing economical. 

Visit of the Pacific Fleet. 

The First Squadron of the Pacific fleet 
under the command of Rear Admiral Wil- 
liam T. Swinburne, will sail from Magda- 
lena Bay, December 1. and should arrive at 
Panama, December 12. The squadron is 
divided into two divisions, each in command 
of a rear admiral, and is made up of the 
following armored cruisers: 

First Division— West /7/:?-?K(7 (flagship of 
Rear Admiral Swinburne), Capt. Alexander 
McCrackin; Colorado. Capt. Edmund B. Un- 
derwood; Maryland. Capt. Moses L. Wood; 
Pennsylvania, Capt. Frank .\. Wilner. 

Second Division— Rear Admiral Uriel Se- 
bree, commanding; Tennessee (flagship of 
Rear Admiral Sebree), Capt. Bradley .A. 
Fiske; California, Capt. Vincendon L. Cott- 
man; Soutli Dakota, Capt. Charles E. Fox; 
Washington, Capt. Austin M. Knight. The 
gunboat Yorktoivn, Commander James \l. 
Glennon accompanies the squadron. 

The fleet will be at anchor in Panama Bay 
from December 12 to December 22, when it 
will sail for Talcahuano, Chile, where it will 
remain from January 4 to January 14. From 
there it will go to Coquimbo, Chile, for five 
days, January 17 to January 22, and on Jan- 
uary 27 it will arrive at Callao, Peru, where 
it will remain until February 10. On that 
date the fleet will sail for Panama where it 
is due February 22 and will remain here 
until March 4 when the squadron will sail 
for northern ports for target practice and 
maneuvers. 
Canal Zone Njt Under U. S. Constitution. 

The Supreme Court of the United States, 
on November 9, dismissed the appeal in the 
case of Adolphus Coulson, convicted of mur- 
der at Gorgona and sentenced to be hanged 
in January, 1907. In dismissing the appeal 
no written decision was rendered by the 
Court, but its action in effect confirms the 
decision of the Supreme Court of the Canal 
Zone. 

Adolphus Coulson, a Barbadian negro, 
killed his wife at Gorgona in January, 1907. 
He was tried in February, 1907, in the Sec- 
ond Circuit Court, before Judge Gudger and 
Messrs. Johnson and Fagan, mayors of Em- 
pire and Gorgona, respectively, under the 
provisions governing trial in capital cases 
contained in the Code of Criminal Procedure 
of the Zone, adopted by the Canal Commis- 
sion in 1904, and in force until February 6, 
1908, when the Executive Order providing 
for jury trial in such cases was issued. On the 
trial of the case, Coulson's counsel asked for 
a jur\', which was denied. The evidence of 
Coulson's guilt, introduced at the trial was 
conclusive. After his conviction the case 
was appealed to the Supreme Court of the 
Canal Zone. 

The only question raised in that court was 
the defendant's right to trial by jury, under 
the Constitution of the United States; it was 
argued that the denial of trial by jury was in 
contravention of the provisions of the Fifth 
and Sixth Amendments of the Constitution, 
that no person shall be deprived of life, lib- 



ertv or property without due process of law, 
and that in all criminal prosecutions the ac- 
cused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and 
public trial by an impartial jury. The Su- 
preme Court of the Zone, holding that legal 
proceedings according to the rulesand forms 
established in the Canal Zone for the protec- 
tion of private rights meet the Constitution- 
al requirements of due process of law, after 
quoting from a decision of the Supreme 
Court of the United States, to the effect that 
"the Constitution is applicible to territories 
acquired by purchase or conquest only when 
and so far as Congress shall so direct," de- 
cided "that the Canal Zone is territory in 
the use and occupation of the United States 
of America, under its control, but not such 
territory that the Constitution would be le.g- 
islative in, and of its own force carry its 
rignts, privileges and limitations into." 

Coulson, who was sentenced to be hanged 
on September 13, 1907, was, on August 30, 
1907, reprieved pending the hearing and de- 
termination of the appeal in the United 
States Supreme Court. The date of his exe- 
cution has not yet been fixed. 

First Execution in Canal Zone. 

Hubert Stout, a Barbadian negro, was 
hanged at the Zone penitentiary at Culebra, 
on November 20. Stout was convicted in 
the Second Circuit Court, at Empire, on 
May 6, 190S, of the murder of Josephine 
Phillipe, also a Barbadian negro, at Gor- 
gona, on March 7, 1903. He was tried by a 
jurv, under the provisions of the Executive 
Order of February 6, 1908. (see TheCan.a.!, 
Record of February 26), and the conviction 
and .sentence of death were affirmed, on ap- 
peal, by the Supreme Court of the Zone. 

Stout's execution was the first in the Ca- 
nal Zone since the organization of the Zone 
government. 

The Cartago Ashore. 

The United Fruit Company's steamer Ozr- 
tago. one of the new boats of tlieir fleet, 
which sailed from New Orleans on Saturday, 
November 14, went ashore on Utila Island 
off the coast of Honduras, about 110 miles 
from Puerto Barrios, on Thursday, November 
19. The passengers are all safe and will be 
brought to Colon on the Parisniina, which 
sailed from New Orleans on November 21, 
due at Colon, November 27. Wrecking ves- 
sels began work on November 23, and it is 
expected that the Cartago can be floated 
after her cargo and ballast have been re- 
moved. 

Experimental Ovens, 

The Subsistence Department has ordered 
four ovens of different type for experimental 
purposes at Commission hotels. It is the 
intention to use them for baking rolls, bis- 
cuit and other forms of fresh bread, and 
after a series of tests the kind best adapted 
for service on the Isthmus will be adopted 
and a number purchased to supply all the 
Commission hotels in the Zone. 



Strains." "Material," "Shop Inspections" 
"Painting, " and "General Requirements." 



Standard Specifications for Structural 

Steel. 

The committee appointed by the Chief 
Engineer to prepare standard specifications 
which may be used to define the quality of 
material and of structural steel, with a view 
to secure uniformity in similar structures in 
the various divisions, has made its report. 
The preamble of the report discusses the 
subject under the headings "Ivoads," "Unit 



Masonic Work in Colon. 

Thb Canai. Record: 

Sojourners' Lodge, No. 874, A. F. and A. 
M., holding of the grand lodge of Scotland, 
met Saturday evening, November 21, 1908, 
in extraordinary communication, in its hall at 
Fifth and Bolivar streets. Colon, and worked 
the third degree on four candidates, in the 
presence of fifty members representing the 
following jurisdictions; Scotland, England, 
Kan.sas, Rhode Island, Missouri, Pennsylva- 
nia, Iowa, Vermont, Louisiana, Minnesota, 
Georgia, Michigan, Mass.-ichusetts, Ohio, 
Washington, Illinois, and New York. 

The degree was conferred by Right Wor- 
shipful Master Clinton G. Carty, assisted by 
Past Masters Ransom Stephens, (formerly 
assistant lecturer grand lodge of Kansas), 
Edmund W. Levy, England, and Graham G. 
Dcdge. Scotland. After work was completed, 
banquet was served in the Washington Hotel. 

Tliis lod;e will meet in postponed ordinary 
communication, on Saturday, November 28, 
at 8 p. m., for ordinary business, including 
election of office bearers for the ensuing Ma- 
sonic year. Sojourning Masons in good 
standing are fraternally invited to attend. 
C. A. Lester, 

of Gate City Lodge. .Vo. 522. Kansas City. Mo. 
Cristobal, Nov. 22, 1908. 



Pacific Masonic Club. 

The Canal Record: 

At the meeting of the Pacific Masonic 
Club on November 21, ten members were 
initiated into the mysteries of the ancient 
order of humility. The charter for this or- 
der will be held open until January 1, 1909, 
after which it will be closed and a member- 
ship fee of %\ charged, to be used for the ben- 
efit of the new library. 

There will be a class of twenty, on Satur- 
day, November 28, and any Master Ma.son 
wishing to receive this degree will please 
communicate with the secretary at the ear- 
liest possible date. 

Masonic clubs on the Line who desire to 
have this work done by theAncon team will 
please notify the secretary at least ten days 
in advance. 

Master Masons who have not yet affiliated 
with the clubs are cordially invited to meet 
with us. 

H. A. Gudger, President. 

RoLi.iN S. Stiles, Secretary. 

Aucon, C. Z., Nov. 22, 1908. 



A committee has been appointed by the 
Chiirmm to consider the advisability of dis- 
continuing the use of the hotel and commis- 
sary coupon booksand substituting a system 
that will require less bookkeeping than the 
present one. 

I.OST — ClrisS'piii be.irins letters "Clio" interwoven 
inn crescent set with smull pearls. Rew.Trd will be 
p.-iid for return of this pin to the office of The C.\nal 
Record. 

IvOST — A pold ring has been Inst on the beach at 
Ancon Cove. TaboRa Island. The finder will be re- 
warded by retttrning this ring to Frank Anderson. 
Gatun. Canal Zone. 



Found — A lady's rain coat was- found in the dress- 
ing room of I.incoln House. Colon, after the dance on 
October 31. A brass door key and handkerchief were 
in the po,-ket. The coat was apparently left by mis- 
take in identification as a sniallcrrain coat is miss- 
ing. If the lady who has the smaller coat will com- 
municate with Mrs. W'. T. Cobuni. Ancon. an ex- 
change will be made. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



99 



k 



DREDGI nG. 

Work of the Sea-going Suction Dredges 
Ancon and Culebra. 

The sea-going suction dredges ^^wro// and 
Culebra work twenty-four hours a day, six 
days a week, and the seventh day they spend 
not in rest, but in making ready for the six 
days to follow. In the making of the Canal 
each of them is doing the work of eight very 
good steam shovels and several dump trains, 
for an ordinary day's record is 15,000 cubic 
yards of material pumped from the prism. 
Each in itself epitomizes the whole great 
work, is a village like one of the Canal Zone 
settlements, for it is at once the place where 
men work, rest, eat, and sleep. Each of them 
has its quarters, mess halls, machine shop, 
power house, and tools for excavating; and 
the spirit of the men in each is like that of 
every Zone settlement — to make next week's 
work count for more than that of the week 
just passed. They are large ships, these 
dredges, 288 feet over all, 47',2 foot beam, 
and 25 feet deep. They came to their work 
under their own steam from Chesapeake 
Bay, and one of them, the Culebra, made 
the long journey through the Strait of Mag- 
ellan. 

The Ancon is working in Limon Bay, from 
the point where the water is 45 feet deep, in 
toward the shore. She is making a channel 
40 feet deep at mean sea-level, and 500 feet 
wide. Already 4,175,342 cubic yards of earth 
have been pumped into her mud bins and 
dropped out in deep water in the Caribbean 
Sea. A similar amount of work on land 
would make a big cut in a large hill, and 
people would see and comment on it. But 
the Aiico?i leaves no trail behind, no visible 
sign of the work, for the channel in Liimon 
Ba3' does not show even at low water. Onl3- 
the men on the ship, and thj engineer 
who takes the cross section measurements, 
or an occasional leadsman who casts just for 
curiosity, know that the channel is there, 
from one to thirty feet below the adjacent 
bottom. 

It is a trifle different with the Culebra, 
which is dredging at the Pacific entrance 
in the Bay of Panama. One standing on 
the docks at La Boca, when the tide is low, 
can see the channel in which the Culebra is 
working, because the mud flits on either 
side rise above the water. The difference is 
only apparent, however, for the Culebra, 
also, is doing most of her work invisibly. 
In the ten months since she first lowered 
her suction pipes in the prism of the Canal 
she has excavated 3,852,794 cubic yards. 

One night recently as the Culebra turned 
in the channel near the end of La Boca wharf 
she dropped her two suction pipes, one on 
either side the ship, into the mud of Panama 
Bay, started her 20-inch centrifugal pumps, 
and moved slowly down the prism of the 
Canal with two streams of mud rushing into 
each of her two big bins. 

On the bridge, under the eye of the cap- 
tain, two men turned the wheels that low- 
ered the suction pipes or raised them as the 
contour of the bottom required. This is im- 
portant work, for if the shoe at the end of the 
pipe rests too deep in the mud the pumps 
will not do their best work, while if it is 
raised a few inches too far above the bottom, 
little more than water will be poured into 
the mud bins. From habit the "pipe man" 
knows by the feel of his wheel and the 



sound of the water falling into the bin, 
whether the shoe is in its proper position. 
Said one of them: "The man at the pipe 
makes the yardage. ' ' 

In the kitchen the steward and his assist- 
ants were finishing their dinner work and 
preparing for breakfast. The crew works 
in four-hour watches, each shift being on 
duty two watches a day, and therefore the 
steward's work is continuous. He serves 
four meals a day— at 6 a. m., 12 noon, 6 
p. m. , and at midnight. Sixty men are not a 
big mess, but they do nit all eat at onetime. 
The food in the cabin is the same as that in 
the forecastle, and is much like the ordinary 
Commission hotel fare. "We don't handle 
j'ardige. here," the steward said, "but the 
records wouldn't amount to much if the 
'chow' gave out." 

No one was at work in the ship's machine 
shop, but the tools were ready, and to begin 
repairs would be a matter of only a few 
minutes. In the pump room, on the third 
deck, the engines were turning with little 
or no noise, or at least no noise that could 
be distinguished in the rattle and chug of 
of the two big pumps, as they drew up from 
the bay and forced toward the mud bins, 
mud, rock, chain, anything that could pass 
through the 6 by 9-inch holes of the dredge 
shoe. Below the pump room was another 
engine room wliere the twin screws of the 
ship are driven, and there, too, the noise of 
the pumps penetrated and subdued all other 
sounds. A young man with a wad of cotton 
waste in his hand, smiled knowingly: "A 
dredge is an engine and a pump. We are 
making the yardage right down here." 

It is so warm in the stoke hole, that 
stokers often leave the ship the day 
they are hired, after only one visit to the 
boiler room. One hundred and thirty 
degrees is an ordinary temperature, and the 
conditions are much better since a new ven- 
tilator was installed some months ago. 
They are using coal on the Culfbra, although 
most of the floating equipment at La Boca 
has oil installation. "Getting down to first 
principles," said the chief engineer, "these 
are the men that run the dredge." 

Fort_v minutes after the ship had turned 
for her seaward run, the pumps were stopped, 
the suction pipes were raised, and the run to 
the dumping groumls was begun. The cap- 
t.ain was overseeing the gauging of the mud 
in the forward bin. Each of the bins is 20 
feet deep and their combined capacity is 
nominally 2,403 cubic yards of material. 
The soundings in three different parts of the 
bin showed 12 feet of solid material under 
the water, and the experience is that this is 
about the average. Sixty per cent of the 
bin capacity is counted as the yardage. It 
was suggested to the captain that his dredge 
was working very smoothly. "Yes," he 
said, "we made 431,537 yards in October. 
But then dredging is easy with a crew like 
m'ne. Not a loifer in the lot." 

The mud flats half a mile or more from 
the channel is the place where the Culebra 
dumps her spoil. All the work is done by 
power. An engine turns the machinery that 
drops the bottom of each bin, letting the 
mud into the sea, and then closes the doors 
again. When the spoil is disposed of the 
ship turns back toward the docks, and half 
an hour later the pumps are started and the 
work of excavating is resumed. On an aver- 
age the dredge makes 10 trips a daj', exca- 



vating over a distance of two miles, and on 
each trip she makes two furrows in the bot- 
tom of the bay, each five feet wide. It is 
not possible so to steer the ship that each 
successive furrow will join with its prede- 
cessor, but wave action and the cross cut- 
ting of the dredge tend to make the bottom 
level, wearing off the high ridges and filling 
in the valleys. In places the cut runs down 
to 50 feet below mean sea-level, 20 feet more 
than is necessary, but this can not be regu- 
lated easily, as dredging at its best is more 
or less blind. The result, however, will be 
a channel not less than 40 feet deep at mean 
tide, although in manv places it may be 
deeper, as the Culebra can dredge 60 feet 
below her water line. 

Nothing that is small enough to pass 
through the 6 by 9-inch holes in the shoe 
can escape the suction of the Auco/i and Cu- 
lebra. The most favorable material is gravel, 
because it lies loose on the bottom, and the 
most difScult is heavy clay or rock. Solid 
rock can not be excavated, but lumps almost 
as big as a man's head are carried through 
the pumps without harmful effects. Re- 
cently the Culebra drew ten fathoms of 
chain from the bottom of the bay and passed 
it through one of the centrifugal pumps into 
the bin, and that is probably the strangest 
performance in Isthmian dredging, for it is 
difficult to understand how so much chain 
could pass through the pumps without be- 
coming entangle^. Not long ago the .-/«ro« 
lifted a cannon ball from the bottom of Li- 
mon Bay. Fish, eels, shells, and rock poured 
into the bins are so common that they no 
longer cause comment. 

On Sunday morning the Culebra ties up 
at La Boca to make light repairs, to coal, 
and to give her crew a few hours shore 
leave. Tlie Ancou ties up at Cristobal for 
like purposes. On Monday both of them 
are at work again, and until the following 
Sunday morning their engines never rest. 



Atlantic Division Steam Shovels. 

The steam shovels of the .Atlantic Division 
excavated 216,961 cubic yards in October. 
The best records for the month follow: 



Shovel 


Cdbic Yards. 


No. of 


No. 


Earth. 


Rock. 


Total. 


work. 


101 .... 
133 .... 


4.280 
2,103 


17.290 
17.669 


21.570 
19,772 


26 
22 


GATDN LOCKS. 


129 .... 

13t 


5.285 


29.223 
34.731 


35.113 
34,731 


27 

27 








SPTLLWAV — GATUN DAM. 


135 .... 


22,690 2.500 j 25.190 


26 


The 


best daily records were as foil 


ows: 



L,ocation. 



in 



Character ma- 
terial exca- 
vated. 



102 Gatun Locks Oct. 

1>9; Gatun Locks Oct. 

135 Gatun spillway. Oct. 
1191 Gatun spillway, i Oct. 

1331 Miudi 1 Oct. 

lul Mindi I Oct. 



20 Rock 

13 Rock 

8 Clay and rock.. 
20| Clay and rock.. 
19! Clay and rock.. 
301 Clay and rock.. 






1.883 
1.855 
1,800 
1.220 
1.592 
1.417 



The Panama Railroad Company will oper- 
ate its regular Sunday schedule of passenger 
trains on November 26, Thanksgiving Day. 



100 



THE CANAL RECORD 



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE. 

■Women's Clubs and Other Features. 

The Pedro Miguel Social Club and the 
Woman's Clubcombined to make the bazaar 
held at the Club rooms on Saturday even- 
ing, November 14, one of the most successful 
events ever given in the town. The rooms 
were decorated with palms and flags, and 
the several booths were made attractive with 
decorations of different colors. The candy 
booth, presided over and furnished by the 
president of the Woman's Club, was deco- 
rated with the club colors, royal purple and 
yellow. The red and cream of the Social Club 
were used in the decoration of the scales, 
and Mrs. Bitely and Mr. Kernealy were in 
charge. The fancy work booth was in red 
and white, with Mrs. Barnes and Mr. Hobbj- 
in charge. The prize offered for the most 
attractive decoration was awarded to this 
booth. A gypsy camp, with Mrs. Vacher 
as fortune teller; a fish pond, run by Mrs. 
Connell and Mr. Piper; grab bag for the 
children, Mrs. Roberts; and a wheel of for- 
tune, operated by Mr. H. Henderson, were 
all attractive features. All the articles sold 
were donated by Pedro Miguel residents 
and the proceeds, $M5, have been divided 
between the Social Club and the Woman's 
Club and will be devoted to the childrens' 
Christmas festival. A special train from 
Paraiso brought a large crowd. 

The Pedro Miguel Woman's Club met at 
the club room on Wednesdaj-, November 18. 
In addition to regular business the arrange- 
ments for the Christmas celebration were 
advanced. 

The literary meeting of the Cristobal 
Woman's Club was held November 18, and 
was well attended. Special invitations had 
been extended to the mothers having chil- 
dren in the Cristobal and Colon schools. An 
address was given by Prof. H. L. Smith, 
Superintendent of Schools, on child life and 
its nature and the responsibilities of the 
home and school in the training and devel- 
oping of the young. At the close of the 
address those present were given an oppor- 
tunity to meet the speaker in the half hour 
when refreshments were served by the social 
committee. On Monday, November 23, the 
Shakespeare study class met, "Macbeth" be- 
ing the subject for the afternoon. The music 
study class takes up the subject of early 
operas and singers at its next meeting, De- 
cember 14. 

The reorganization of the Paraiso Woman's 
Club was affected on Thursday afternoon, 
November 19, ten charter members having 
enrolled. Women who were unable to be pres- 
ent at the first meeting have requested that 
the charter remain open until a future date. 
The chair was taken by Mrs. E. S. Waid, 
for the purpose of organization, and the fol- 
lowing officers were elected: President, Mrs. 
E. B. Healy; vice-president, Mrs. Mclntyre; 
secretary, Mrs. Wm. Downs; treasurer, Mrs. 
Mclvaughlin. The next meeting will be held 
on Thursday, December 3, when the organ- 
ization will be completed and placed on a 
working basis. 

The Ancon Woman's Club held its program 
meeting November 18, the guest of honor 
being Mr. Joseph Lefevre, Minister of Pub- 
lic Works, Republic of Panama, who gave 
an interesting survey of the history of Pan- 



ama from the time of Columbus to the pres- 
ent day. There was a large attendance. 
The executive board held a called meeting 
the same day for the purpose of discvissing 
bazaar matters. The sale will be open on 
the afternoons and evenings of December 4 
and 5. All articles left over on the second 
evening will be sold at aucti'>n. Attractive 
booths are being arranged by the depart- 
ments, and books, pictures, calendars and 
fancy articles will be sold. A Japanese tea 
room, a children's room, and a fortune teller 
are promised as special features. The regu- 
lar meeting of the literary and educational 
department was held on Tuesday of this 
week instead of Wednesday as usual. The 
other departments have suspended meetings 
until after the bazaar. The next program 
meeting will be held December 2. The reg- 
ular roll call will be answered with Indian 
legends. The club will issue its 3-ear book 
early next month. 

The date of the January meeting of the 
Federation, which will be held in Ancon by 
invitation of the Ancon club, has not yet 
been fixed, but it will take place after the 
15th of the month. 

There was a large attendance at the meet- 
ing of the Las Cascadas Woman's Club, which 
was held at the residence of Mrs. F. S. 
Grosby, on November 19. It was a social 
meeting, and refreshments were served by 
the entertainment committee. 

The cake sale, arranged by the Women's 
Guild, for the benefit of St. Luke's Church, 
Ancon, was held at the chaplain's house on 
afternoon and evening of November 20. The 
proceeds, about §50, will be used to defray 
the expense of the Guild in the purchase of 
hangingsaud decorations for the newchapel, 
which, it is expected, will be open on Christ- 
mas Day. 

Thanksgiving Day will be observed by 
special services at the Protestant chapel, 
Ancon Hospital, which will be suitably dec- 
orated for the occasion. Rt. Rev. Albion 
W. Knight, D. D., bishop of Cuba, who ar- 
rived on the Isthmus on November 23, for 
his second official visit, is expected to preach 
the sermon at the 9 o'clock service. 

The Gatun Woman's Club at met the home 
of Mrs. W. C. Story, Friday, November 20, 
the president, Mrs. E. L. Bandy, in the 
chair. Nearly all the members of the club 
were present. The following chairmen of 
standing committees were appointed: Edu- 
cational, Mrs. H. K. Higgins; domestic or 
philanthropy, Mrs. C. G. Carty; musical, 
Mrs. C. D. Corp. Mrs. Corp was also ap- 
pointed chairman of the committee on the 
revision of by-laws, with Mrs. A. T. McCul- 
lock, assistant. A calendar for the year, 
presented by a committee which included the 
president, was adopted by unanimous vote 
of the club. The schedule calls for a meet- 
ing on every Friday at 3 o'clock, in the fol- 
lowing order: First Friday, business meet- 
ing; second, stud}', subject for the year, 
Panima; third, club program, furnished by 
the members; fourth, program, paper or ad- 
dress by an invited guest. The calendar is 
arranged up to May 1 and the programs will 
be varied and interesting. A year book con- 
taining all announcements will be issued 
shortly. 

The sale of the Gatun "Sunshine" Club 
was held in the club room over the Commis- 
sion hotel on Monday November 23. 

The Christian F^udeavor and other organ- 



izations at Gatun are keeping up their in- 
terest well and add greatly to the life of 
the residents. The Christmas entertainment 
promises well. The teachers of the school 
have undertaken to drill the children for 
their share in the program. 

The Wizard's Club will give a dance at the 
clubhouse, Empire, on Tiiauksgiving eve. 

The program meetingof the Empire Wom- 
an's Club held on Tuesday, November 17 
was well attended. The subjects chosen were 
as follows: "What I am thankful for in the 
Canal Zone," by thepresident. "TheSpirit 
of Thanksgiving," by Mrs. H. C. Ball, and 
" The First Thanksgiving Proclamation." 
Musical numbers were given by Mrs. Mc- 
Tyier and Mrs. F. M. Bell. The club will 
hold its meeting every alternate Thursday 
beginning with December 10, the ne.xt regu- 
lar meeting. 



PERSONAL. 



Commissioner Jo C. S. Blackburn, accom- 
panied by Mrs. Blackburn, sailed for the 
States on \.he Co/o/i on Wednesday, Novem- 
ber 25, for eight weeks' leave of absence. 

Col. W. C. Gor.gas, of the Isthmian Canal 

Commission, accompanied by Mrs. Gorgas, 
Miss Gorgas, Miss Laura Carter, Miss Keene, 
of Philadelphia, and Judge Eva.is, of Cincin- 
nati, sailed for Valparaiso, Chile, on the 
P. S. N. Co. steamship Paiianix from La 
Boca, on Monday, November li. Col. Gor- 
gas was appointed b}- the Secretary of State 
one of the ten delegates from the United 
States to the Pan-.4merican Scientific Con- 
gress, which will meet at Santiago, Chile, on 
December 25. He will present a paper during 
the sessions of the Congress, on "The Con- 
trol of Yellow Fever in the Tropics." Col- 
onel Gorgas expects to return to the Isth- 
mus on February 8. Dr. Pedro Obarrio, Su- 
perintendent of Santo Tomis Haspital, Pan- 
ama, adelegate to the Congress from the Re- 
public of Panama, also sailed on the same 
steamer with Colonel Gorgas. 

Mr. F. G. Maltby, formerly in the Isth- 
mian Canal service, is expected to arrive on 
the Isthmus November 30. He will have 
charge, for the contractors, of the construc- 
tion of the handling plant at Gatun. 



Obituary. 

Charles Vanne, of Baltimore, Md., died 
at Ancon Hospital on November 18. He 
came to the Isthmus about five years ago, 
was 62 years of age, unmarried, and was 
employed in the printing office of the Com- 
mission at Panama. 



Missing Man. 
Mr. Brent Woodill, of Covington, Ky., sec- 
retary of the University of Cincinnati and 
nephew of Dr. C. W. Dabney, head of that 
institution, disappeared from his home on 
November 1, and it is believed that he came 
to the Isthmus. If he will call on J. W. Belt, 
Administration Building. Ancon, lie will re- 
ceive information which will be valuable to 
him. 

The grading of the road for the highway 
to connect Corozal with Camp Diablo is 
nearly complete and plans are being pre- 
pared for an extension of the Panama-Coro- 
zal road toward Miraflores. Woric will be- 
gin on the extension as soon as the plans 
are approved. 



1' i J E C A N A L K H C O R D 



101 



CHAGRES RIVER TOPOGRAPHY. 

Survey B?gun on the Basin Above Gam- 
boa. 

A topographical survey of the watersheil of 
the Cha.ttres River was I)egun on Noveinlier 
11, when a P-irty of three engineers and fif- 
teen laborers niirle a camp on the Cliililire 
River above Ganilioa. The survey is umL-r- 
taken to determine as accur.itely as n-ces- 
sary the drainage area of the river in onL-r 
to estimate as closely as possible the water 
supply for Gatun Lake. It will be a trav- 
erse survey, and will be extended to tlie 
limits of the watershed. The watershed of 
the river above G.imboa will be survived 
first, and then the work will bs extended to 
include all the streams in the Chagres Ijasin 
below Gamboa, including the princip.d trib- 
utaries, the Rio Trinidad ami GatunciUo 
River.* 

In prosecuting the survey of' the basin 
above Gamboa four parties will work along 
the river, two on each side, ami will extend 
the lines from the river to the tops of tlie 
hills that bound the watershed. The survey 
will thus be completetl in zones from the 
hills on the east to those on the west. 

It is estimated that the length of the 
Chagres, from its mouth in the Caribbean 
Sea to its source in the mountains that skirt 
the shore of that sea, is 120 miles, and the 
area of the watershed is 1,200 miles. The 
basin above Gamboa, in which the survey- 
ors are now at work, is estimated as aljout 
600 square miles in area. About fifteen miles 
in direct line above Gamboa, but twenty-five 
miles by the river, the Chagres branches into 
two smaller streams, the Chagres and the 
Pequeni. The point where these streams 
join is known as Dos Bocas (two mouths,. 
Tlie headwaters of the Chagres are in the 
hills that skirt the Caribbean Sea, and are 
probably about ten miles from the coast. Its 
course is southeast to its confluence with the 
Pequeni, and between its source in the hills 
and Dos Bocas the river receives several 
tributaries, of which the Indio, Feo, Linipio,» 
Chico, Piedras, and Esperanza rivers are the 
chief. The Pequeni also rises in the hills 
on the Atlantic coast, and its course is almost 
due south to the mouth at Dos Bocas. Its 
principal tributary is the Boqueron. The 
old royal road from Porto Bello to Panama 
runs along the east banks of the Buqueron 
and Pequeni to a point near Dos Bocas, 
where it cuts across country to Panama. 
The cobble pavement can stdl be found in 
the jungle, although it is covered with rank 
vegetation, and large trees have grown up 
between tlie stones. 

The Chagres falls 179 feet between Santa 
Barbara, three miles above Dos Bocas, on 
the upper Chagres, and Gamb.^a, a distance 
by water of about 2S miles. There are 35 
small rapids between these two points, and 
the current is so strong throughout that bp- 
streaiu navigation is entirely bj- cayuco and 
pole. Between Alhajuela and Dos Bocas, 
and above Dos Bocas on the Chagres, the 
stream has cut its way through a plateau or 
a series of loiv hills, making fur its^lt a 
canon-like channel. In many places the 

*The river referred to as Galuncillo is 111 it wliich 
flows into the Chayres near Ciatun, and when liie 
Galuu RivLT is spokc-n uf the refereujj is to a sm.ill 
stream that flows into tlie Chajrres bjlween G.iuiboa 
nnd Alh.ijucla. 1 htse names h.'ive been usea iiile - 
chanyeably by cartOiirapliers. and no little confasion 
has resulted. 



banks are rock palisades, cut into fanciful 
SKipes at the base liy the erratic river, here 
scarred from top to bo'.tom by tiny waterfalls, 
there festooned witli ferns and long grasses, 
the rank foliage brightened now and again 
with the purple or yellow of the trumpet 
vine, or an occasional orchid. It is possible 
to go tbirty or forty miles up the Chagres 
above D is liocas by cayuco. but farther up 
navigation is unsatisfactory. A five da>s' 
journey up th^f Pequeni from Dos Bocas 
brings one to a series of rapids around wliich 
the cayuco must be carried, but beyond that 
the jo.trney may be cantinued by boat three 
days longer. 

Bi-tween Dos Bocas and Gamboa the most 
i nportant triliutaries of the Chagres are the 
Gatun,* which flows in about nine miles 
above Gamboa, an. I the Chilibre, which 
joins the Chagres about five miles above 
Gamboa. Both of these rivers are small 
.streams, draining small areas. It is along 
these alflu-nts of the Cli igres that the first 
surveys will be mad;. Hills, plateaus, and 
lowlands are coaiprised in the territory, and 
the land is so sparsely settled that the survey- 
ing parties will be supplied by cayuco on the 
Ch.igres and Pecjueiii rivers, as the country 
affords a bare living to the few negroes who 
inhabit it. It is a fertile region, but only a 
small part of it is under cultivation. 

The survey now in progress will be the 
first complete one of the basin of the Chag- 
res. although several have been made of 
pj.-tiotis of th± basin, and under various 
ausp ces. In 1875, Commander E. P. Lull 
and Lieut. E. Collins, U. S. N., made a 
traverse survey along the Chagres from 
Gamboa to Las Campanas, between the pres- 
ent stations of .\lhajuela and Vigia. Tliey 
located a site for a dam which was to deflect 
the water of the Chagres into an aqueduct 
by which it would be carried to Gamboa to 
feed the upper level of a proposed lock canal. 
Previous to this the Colombian Government 
had made some surveys, the results of which 
were published in a map in 1864. Both the 
old and new French companies made sur- 
veys incident to t'.;eir work of gaging the 
river. The Wyse map of 1885 contains 
the results of some of the .surveys made by 
the old company. The results of the sur- 
veys made by the new company are embodied 
in the map which formed part of the property 
purchased by the United States in 190-1. One 
of the.se maps gives the topography of the 
coantry up to the 60 meter (iy7-foot) con- 
tour. 

In June, 190+, a survey of the whole Chag- 
res basin was begun by the Isthtiiian Canal 
Commission. The vallej- above Gamboa was 
developed to the 200-foot contour, and this 
part of the work was finished in the summer 
of 190^. The basin below Gamboa was devel- 
oped to the 100-foot contour, and this survey 
was finished in the summer of 1907. The sur- 
vey above Gamboa included, in addition to to- 
pography, an investigation by borings of the 
Gainlioa dam site, and on the site proposed 
for the diversion tunnel, which was to divert 
tlie water of the Chagres through Gatun 
River to the GatunciUo. Two surveys re- 
cently attempted, but not finished, were un- 
dertaken to develop the upper Chagres ba- 
sin. One of them was begun at Porto Bello, 
and the other developed a part of the water- 
shed of the I^speranz;! River. 

In connection with the topographical sur- 
vey, the river gaging and rainfall work of 



the Commission will be extended and com- 
pleted. The data so far available are valu- 
able, but not complete. They include the 
records of the old and new French compa- 
nies, the records of the Isthmian Canal 
Commission since 190-)-, and the investiga- 
tions by Gen. Harrj- L. Abbott and A. P. 
Davis, prior to the American occupation. 
The gaging station at Gamljoa was e.stab- 
lislied early in the French regime, but its 
records are complete only since 1892. The 
St itioii at Alhajuela was opened on .April 15, 
1899, near the site chosen for the dam, which 
was part of the plan for controlling the 
Chagres and insuring a supply of water dur- 
ing the dry season. It is eleven miles by 
river from Gamboa and at elevation 92. 
The Coinmission has recently established a 
station at Vigia, 21 miles by river north of 
Gamboa, at elevation 129. 

In the summer of 1899 rainfall and river 
gaging stations were establi.shed by the 
French company at Salamanca on the Rio 
Pequeni, 5.5 miles north of Dos Bocas at 
elevation 200; at Las Minas.on the Pequeni, 
12 miles north northeast of Dos Bocas at ele- 
vation 250, and at Santa Birbara on the up- 
per Chagres, three miles from Dos Bocas and 
at an elevation oi 225. Rainfall stations 
were also opened on a hill between the 
Cli igres and the Rio Feo, 4.5 miles north- 
east of Dos Bocas, at an elevation of 850 feet, 
an<l on a hill in the Rio Puente basin four 
miles southeast of Dos Bocas, at an elevation 
of 610 feet. -All these stations, excepting 
tliat at .\lhajuela, were abindoned after a 
few months and the records taken at them 
are therefore of verv limited value. 



EXECUTIVE t. RDER. 

Rig:lit of Appeal in Criminal Casea. 

Under authority vested in me bj- law, it is 
ordered: 

1. .\n appeal from the judgment of a 
district court of the Canal Zone may be 
taken by the defendant b\- givin.g notice in 
open court of his intention so to do at the 
time the judgment is rendered, or by filing 
with the court a written notice of appeal 
within five days thereafter. The appeal may 
thereupon be perfected by the <lefendant by 
tiling with the district court or with thec'reuit 
court to wli'cli the appeal is taken, a liond 
in a sum fixed by the judge of .said district 
court or the judge of said circuit court, but 
not exceeding two hundred and fifty dollars, 
and with one or more sufficient sureties ap- 
proved by the court or clerk accepting the 
same, for his appearance and trial upon 
appeal in the circuit court: Provided, That 
if a money deposit be made in lieu of the 
bond, the amount to be deposited shall not 
exceed one-half of the sum required in the 
bond. 

2. Sections 44, 45 and 46 of the Code of 
Criminal Procedure of the Canal Zone are 
hereby repealed. 

Theodore Roosevelt. 
The White House, 

[No. 966.] 



A High Shovel Record. 

On November 19, nine steam shovels of 
95-ton class, working in the Empire District, 
Central Division, loaded 837 cars, containing 
15,696 cubic yards of material, mostly rock 
that had been blasted. Tlie average per 
shovel for this day was 1,744 cubic yards. 



102 



TUB CANAL RECORD 



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS. 

Isthmian Purchasing Agent, 

CrLiCRK \. C. 7. . N' V -mb-r 19. 1^'Os. 
ClRCri-AR No. 221. 

Effective this dnte: Mnj.'r K. T. Wilson, in addition 

to his othtT duties, is appointed I'urchasiiijr Ajrenlon 

Ihf Isthtnus fur subsistence and com mi.esnry supplies. 

(:ii:<i. w. f'.oi:Tii.>\i,s. 

Chairman, /xfhwian Caual Commission. 

President, /hmania f^aiiroad Company. 



Regulations for Reimbtirseinent Youehera. 

Di;rARTMKNT OF KXAMIXATION OF ACCOVXTS, 

Hmfiuk. C. Z.. November 11. 190S. 
CiRCiLAr, No. 5. 

TK.-VVnLlNG EXPF,NSFS. 

Effective December 1. l^OS: The folkiwiuH reRula- 
tions will Koven: in the prepai-ntion and rendition of 
reimbursement vouchers covering additional expenses 
incurred by officers and employes of the Isthmian 
Canal Commission while traveling on official busi- 
ness, utider iiroper orders, on the Isthmus. 'I'liescrek'- 
ulations do not apply when the order requires travel 
which he^ius beyond or extends be>ond the Isthmus. 

1. Reimbursements fi>r exrenses incurred by an 
cini)lf>\ e while on duty awaj- from his official slatif)n 
will be allowird o\\\y when such expenses arein addi- 
tion to Ihc ordinary daily livin;i expenses of the em- 
ploye at home and necessitated by tlie performance of 
the duty required. No tips of any kind will be al- 
lowed while traveling on the Tslhnms Sunday ex- 
p2 ises.on v^-rbal ord^^rs, require specific explanation 
by officer directing such. 

2. Kxpense accounts should be presented immedi- 
ately after the close of each month and should cover 
all expenses for that month. 

3. Accuun!s must be rendered on the regular fornj 
and the instructions on backof .same must be followed. 
The form at pre.'^ent in use is X-5t. 

RF-i:\rnvRSL:Mi:xT for iMK.^LS. 

4. On account c>f the confusion lesuUing b>' reason 
of the different desig^nations for the variou.s meals, 
hereafter on rcimbursemeut vouchers they will T>e 
described as " MorninK Meal." '" Noon Meal " and 
Evening Meal." 

5. In case of an emploje who boards at an I. C. C. 
hotel when at his official station: 

(a) If detailed to dutv at a place where there is an 
I. C. C. hotel he is entitled to no reimbursement 

Ch) If detailed to a place where no I, C C. hotel is 
available lie will be reimbursed for the actual cost of 
meals less .^0 cents. 

(c» The Tivoli Hotel is to be considered "accessi- 
ble" to employes detailed iodul\- in the vicinity of 
Ancon and meals taken there will be at the regular 
hotel rates for employes of the Commission less 30 
cents per meal. Such rcg:ular rates at present in effect 
at the Tivoli Hotel are as follow-: 50 cents morning 
meal. 50 cents noon meal. $1 CO eveniner meal, which 
allows reimbursement of 20 cents each for morning; 
and noon meals and 70 cents for the evenintr meal, 

(d) If while traveling in the cit>- of Panama, claim 
for reimbursement for meals at more than the rate 
specified in the forcKoiny: paragraph (5c) is made, the 
voucher must show specifically that the "'.seri'ice w is 
rendered and the meal taken iu the vicinity of the 
old Administration Building." 

6. In case of an employe who does not board at an 
I. C. C. hotel, but keeps house or boards at a monthly 
rate when at his official station: 

(a) If detailed to duty where there is an I. C. C. 
hotel he is only entitled to reimbursement for 30 
cents, or the price of a nital coupon. 

(h) If detailed forduty at a place where no I. C. C. 
hotel is available or accessible he will be reimbursed 
for the actual and reasonable cost of his meals. 

(c) The Tivoli Hotel i.s to be considered "accessi- 
ble to employes detailed to dut.\' in thevicinitj of An- 
con and meals taken there will be at the regular ho- 
tel rates for employes of the Commission. Such regu- 
lar ratesat i)resent in effect at the Tivoli Hotel are as 
follows: 50 cents morning meal, 50 cents noon meal, 
$1.0 1 evening meal. 

td) If while traveling in the cit>' of Panama, claim 
for reimbuisement fur meals at more than the rates 
specified in the foregoing paragraph (6c > is made, the 
voucher must show specifically that the "service was 
rendered and the meals taken in the vicinity of the 
Old Admini tration Building." 

7. When it is necessary for employes to leave their 
regiilar stations prior to 7 a. m., for travel on special 
official business, allowance of 30 cents for the morn- 
ing meal will be made for those who do not board at 
but are convenient loan I. C. C. hotel. At stations 
where there is no l. C. C hotel or mess, the actual and 
reasonable cost of the morning meal will be allowed. 

8. Employes who do not use hotel books for their 



dailv subsistence, and who are frequently detailed on 
oflicial business away from their regular sLition may 
procure a sixteeu-coupon meal book for use on such 
t.ii3sanil thereby avoid the necessity of paying the 
ci*^h rate of 50 cents per meal at the I. C. C. hotels 
and the di.siidvantage of being reimbursed for only 
3 i cents. 

9. Meals in the cities of Colon and Cri.stobal are 
liiuite.l to 3 Ocents per me;il. No reimbursement in 
excess of 30 cents will be made. 

TR.\NSl'ORr.\TION. 

U). No transportation on the Panama railroad will 
be reimbursed, as amounts paid to the Panama rail- 
loiid by the Commission cover both passenger and 
freight transponation. 

U. Should it be necessary at any time for an em- 
ploye of the Commission to pay for transpoitation 
either for himself, his assist uits, or necessary equip- 
ment, while carrying out official orders, he should 
secure receipt of the agent to whom payment is made, 
a iJ pre-i2.U cl li.n ior reimburs.'inmt to the Panama 
Railroad Company. 

12. Cab fare must always be in accordance with 
tariff rate, and the form followed wlien rendering 
claim for reimbursement of same must conform to 
that given on the back of voucher form. 

1 '. In Panama parlicularcare must be exercised in 
giving the places between which transportation is 
fnrnislied, because certain portions of Ancon and 
Panama are covered by regular tariff prescribed by 
the Alcalde of Panama. It is not sufficient to say 
'Panama railroad station to Administration Build- 
ing." becans-? there are two Administration Build- 
insis — one at Ancon. and one. known as the Old Ad- 
ministration Building, in the city of Panama. 

SPFCI.\L REGULATIONS. 

14. There are certain special regulations tnat will 
govern the expens.-acjouats of policemen and others 
detailed to plain clothes duty. The.se men may be 
allowed the actual cost of meals taken, even though 
in excess of 30 cents and there is a Commission hotel 
accessible, provided in each case the voucher is ac- 
companied by a special certificate stating "that to 
iKive availed themselves of the Commission rate would 
have revealed their identity and nullified efforts iu 
invc-stigations." 

W. W. Warwick, 
Examiner of Accounts. 
Approved: 
H. K. Hodges. 

Aciins Chairman and Chief En.tiineer. 

New Form of Meal Tickets, 

IJKPARTMENT OF EXAMIN.\TION OF ACCOUNTS, 

p:mpike. C. Z., November 19. 19US. 

ClKCULAK No. 6. 

Infective. December 1. 1908: The form of meal tickets 
now in use will be discontinued. 

The following form of mtal tickets are now on 
hand, and will be used effective with issues on the 
afternoon of Tuesday. December 1. 190S: 

3o-Crnt Colored Laboreis" Meal Tickets. 

443 — A Atlanti:^ Division. 

44S— C Cential Division. 

44S — M Mechanical Divisioii- 

448 — P Pacific Division. 

448— PR Panama Railroad. 

448 — Q Quartermaster's Department. 

443— S Sanitary Department. 

44S— Misc Department 

4o-Cent European Laborers' Meal Tickets. 

4+9 — A Atlantic Division. 

449— C Centnil Division. 

449 — M Mechanical Division. 

449 — P Pacific Divi.siori. 

4t9 — PR Panama Railroad- 

449 — Q Quartermaster's Department, 

449 — S Sanitary Department. 

449— Misc Department. 

These tickets are numbered consecutively for each 
department and will be furnished upon recini-^itions 
sent to the Examiner of Accounts, (as in the case of 
coupon books) . upon form X-47. A supply of this 
form of requisition should be obtained from the Sta- 
tioner and Printer. 

Timekeepers will be charged with the value of all 
tickets furnished them and will render monthly 
stock report on form X-56, (now in press). Canceled 
tickets will be listed thereon and sent to the I^xani- 
iner of Accounts with monthly stock report. The